Sudden hoof problems
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Sudden hoof problems

This is a discussion on Sudden hoof problems within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Elpo hoof mapping

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-13-2013, 11:24 PM
  #1
Foal
Sudden hoof problems

My horse went barefoot all winter and was perfectly sound and then I had shoes put on his front feet for spring. I recently had my horses feet trimmed by a new farrier. When the new farrier came out I had him take off his shoes and just trim and I explained to him I wanted to go barefoot.
After the trim the farrier explained that the heels were slung under and causing the hooves to shift and crack the sole due to not enough heel and too much toe. (Attached are before pictures.) The farrier said he had taken off the excess toe and had trimmed his foot to where the heel is now where it should be.
I rode my horse later on that day and noticed he was very sore on all of his feet so I immediately got off and called the farrier (My horse has always been sound. Never had any issues with his feet before this.) He said to mix betadine and sugar and pack that on his hooves for a few days. I packed that mixture on his hooves for 3 days and let him rest on the 4th day. Today I rode him, it has been 5 days since the trim and my horse was still somewhat sore, not as bad as the day he got the trim. While riding at the jog I noticed he was dragging all of his feet but mainly dragging his back feet. He never had this problem before now! I need opinions! Why is he suddenly dragging his feet? Should he still be sore? What does it sound like is wrong to you?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg front hoof.jpg (44.5 KB, 90 views)
File Type: jpg back hoof.jpg (44.9 KB, 88 views)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-13-2013, 11:45 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Do you have after pictures? I'd like to see what he did.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-13-2013, 11:47 PM
  #3
Foal
I don't have any after pictures at the moment. I will take some tomorrow and post them here.
     
    07-14-2013, 11:09 AM
  #4
Weanling
It is quite possible that your horse is simply sore from the trim taking off so much all at once causing such a change in the "geometry" of how the hoof impacts the ground that he is now using all of his support system in a different way that causes soreness.

It would be the same to say take a person that wore high heel boots for six months straight and they were running, jogging, walking....basically doing exercise, and every time their foot touched the ground it was in those boots. Now if they were to suddenly switch to a completely flat footed running shoe and they kept with the running, jogging, etc.... they are going to be quite sore because their muscles, tendons, ligaments all have to adjust to the change in one fell swoop.
     
    07-14-2013, 11:18 AM
  #5
Trained
Those fronts with the shoes look very underslung to me, this after the new farrier reset them? I am confused because you said you had the farrier remove the shoes to go barefoot? If he did pull the shoes and those are before pics, it would make more sense, the horse is tenderfooted by having no shoe on. Okay, just read those were the before pics, all hooves are crazy underslung, glad you got a farrier to correct that. Your horse is probably sore because you pulled the shoes. Mine go barefoot in winter as well but if keep riding into spring with no protection when the ground is harder & I ride more, they would get sore & even worse if I pulled their shoes right now after wearing them since spring. I don't pull shoes until snow is on the ground or it's mucky going into winter.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-14-2013, 08:15 PM
  #6
Foal
Thanks so much everyone for the replies!

I attached after pictures so hopefully that will help everyone get a better understanding.

The pictures go in this order, back right, back left, front left, front right.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg back right.rightone.jpg (39.3 KB, 66 views)
File Type: jpg back right.jpg (36.3 KB, 63 views)
File Type: jpg front left.jpg (24.5 KB, 65 views)
File Type: jpg front right.jpg (36.8 KB, 63 views)
     
    07-14-2013, 08:55 PM
  #7
Yearling
You have contracted heels and over grown bars as well as toe distortion and stretched frogs. There is much more toe than heel on the fronts and somewhat on the backs. We call front feet like these bonnet feet. You should have equal or more heel area than toe when you draw a line across the foot in the center of the coffin bone via hoof mapping.

All of them except for the back left appear to possibly have deep sulcus thrush also. Back rights heels look possibly imbalanced. Can't tell in this angle, but I can certainly tell the bars are not trimmed properly and there is contraction on all feet. You also likely have long heels and deficient frogs/digital cushions. See how pointy all those heel bulbs are? Not normal. This horse needs some remedial trimming and rehabilitation by a much better farrier than what he has if they can't recognize there is a problem here and have a plan to fix it.


Google ELPO hoof mapping. At this point, finding an ELPO certified farrier is a great idea. Google ELPO hoof mapping if you want to learn more. You will see just how out of whack these feet are.
     
    07-14-2013, 09:23 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
You have contracted heels and over grown bars as well as toe distortion and stretched frogs. There is much more toe than heel on the fronts and somewhat on the backs. We call front feet like these bonnet feet. You should have equal or more heel area than toe when you draw a line across the foot in the center of the coffin bone via hoof mapping.

All of them except for the back left appear to possibly have deep sulcus thrush also. Back rights heels look possibly imbalanced. Can't tell in this angle, but I can certainly tell the bars are not trimmed properly and there is contraction on all feet. You also likely have long heels and deficient frogs/digital cushions. See how pointy all those heel bulbs are? Not normal. This horse needs some remedial trimming and rehabilitation by a much better farrier than what he has if they can't recognize there is a problem here and have a plan to fix it.


Google ELPO hoof mapping. At this point, finding an ELPO certified farrier is a great idea. Google ELPO hoof mapping if you want to learn more. You will see just how out of whack these feet are.
Thanks so much for your response! What exactly is contracted heels, toe distortion, and stretched frogs? Are they fixable problems? When you say there is contraction on all feet what do you mean? Can you tell if there is an improvement since the before pictures? Thanks so much!!
     
    07-14-2013, 10:18 PM
  #9
Yearling
All are indeed fixable by a good farrier. This trim isnt there yet. It needs more work, more toe removed and bars fixed better.

I suggest googling and reading up an everything you can about those issues.

Here is a great place to start. Barefoot Hoof Care - Page 1
     
    07-15-2013, 07:26 PM
  #10
Weanling
Heel contraction--the heel bulb looks really narrow in comparison to the size of the hoof and the toe is pushed very far forward. My QH mare came to me with feet like that because she'd been wearing shoes for several years, and they were not being re-set frequently enough. She was shod because she had "bad" feet. :S It is fixable! I finally have an almost normal hoof shape, and am starting to get compliments on her great feet when people see her. Mostly you have to get rid of the thrush and get the toes backed up (a lot). It's a matter of finding a good farrier.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weanling + Hoof cleaning = sudden issue? demonwolfmoon Horse Training 12 11-19-2011 06:06 PM
sudden problems with stopping and downwards transitions Rachel1786 Dressage 2 08-17-2011 01:19 PM
Sudden problems with right-leg canter Starsnflames Horse Health 2 06-10-2011 06:03 PM
Hoof Problems devildogtigress Hoof Care 2 06-06-2011 11:48 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0