Throws Shoe almost Constantly? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 17 Old 03-11-2013, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Throws Shoe almost Constantly?

Hi, I'm a newer rider still learning stuff about horses, so I apologize for my silly question.

I volunteer at a therapeutic barn where we have this one horse who constantly throws his shoes or has a shoe loose. He is a well-bred QH who used to be shown on the QH circuit (I don't know if that makes a difference or not) who now does light work a few days a week as a lesson horse. He's mainly ridden in the indoor which has sand flooring and gets daily turnout. He's probably in his mid-late teens. He has a good farrier who comes every few weeks (to split up how many horses he has to do at once) and none of the other horses he trims/shoes have this problem.

So why is it that every few weeks I have to tramp through the pasture to find a thrown shoe, or go to pick out his hooves only to find a loose shoe?

Also, is it okay to ride him if his shoe is loose? The instructor at the barn and another girl who interned there says it's okay, but I wanted a second opinion.

Thank you!

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post #2 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 08:31 AM
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No, don't ride if it's loose. And if this horse is in such light work why does it have shoes in the first place? If he was barefoot that would solve the problem.
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post #3 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 08:56 AM
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I would suppose he is shod because he has inherently bad feet. Horses with shelly, thin walled, thin soled hooves can be a real problem. Feeding a supplement with Biotin and Methionine in it can help. It can also help if your farrier uses shoes with clips or uses very light-weight training plates.

Are his heels under-run and low? If so, it also helps if they set the shoes back and get his feet more upright, especially his front ones. That keeps him over-reaching and pulling his shoes loose.

If I had to put up with is bad feet, I would feed a supplement with Biotin and Methioine in it. Then, I would get a good 'barefoot trim' on him and ride him with Easy Boots. He would need his hooves 'rounded up' every couple of weeks for a while to keep him for breaking the wall out above his sole. I would sure give it a try.

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post #4 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by poppy1356 View Post
No, don't ride if it's loose. And if this horse is in such light work why does it have shoes in the first place? If he was barefoot that would solve the problem.
That was my question. Is this horse shod all around? What shoe keeps coming off? Perhaps they are overreaching and bell boots would help if he MUST have shoes at all.......

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post #5 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie View Post
I would suppose he is shod because he has inherently bad feet. Horses with shelly, thin walled, thin soled hooves can be a real problem. Feeding a supplement with Biotin and Methionine in it can help. It can also help if your farrier uses shoes with clips or uses very light-weight training plates.
If he is constantly throwing shoes due to thin hoof walls, the last thing you want is clips. If he throws a shoe with a clip, a big chunk of hoof would likely come with.

OP, are you able to find the shoes he throws? If so, the farrier should be able to determine how the shoe is coming off and set it to compensate.
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 09:54 AM
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He is either a rescue the Therapy Group took in because they recognized his therapy horse qualities, OR he was given up by the owners because they felt something was so wrong with him, they didn't want to keep him and a being a Therapy Horse would beat the alternative of the auction -possible-slaughter-truck-barn.

Given what his life is now and he spends most of that time in the arena, he does not need shoes but try and get the Owners to hear that.

Also try and get the owners to hear he needs some oral hoof supplements and possibly a diet change.

At the very least, they should be willing to keep him barefoot as it would save money. If their farrier says "he can't go barefoot" they need a new farrier

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post #7 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
He is either a rescue the Therapy Group took in because they recognized his therapy horse qualities, OR he was given up by the owners because they felt something was so wrong with him, they didn't want to keep him and a being a Therapy Horse would beat the alternative of the auction -possible-slaughter-truck-barn.

Given what his life is now and he spends most of that time in the arena, he does not need shoes but try and get the Owners to hear that.

Also try and get the owners to hear he needs some oral hoof supplements and possibly a diet change.

At the very least, they should be willing to keep him barefoot as it would save money. If their farrier says "he can't go barefoot" they need a new farrier
And you know this HOW? I happen to have one I free lease to a therapy program and honestly, I resent your implication. My guy needed a new job-he loves it and is good at it. AND, when he is done working there, he will come back to me and live out his days. These programs often benefit all parties involved, including the horse and are not simply for "throw away" auction/meat bound horses. My guy has actually been in 2 different programs, and in neither one did I pay for farrier work, so that is not typically an expense the owner pays for. I do supply his supplements, because I want to specify what he gets. I know what works. You are also wrong about the amount of time spent in arenas-typically they have MAYBE 2 hour long sessions a day, 4-5 days a week. As far as what he is fed-I told them how much when I took him there 18 months ago-they are responsible for him and have fed him to keep him optimum weight, etc. I do not second guess them, as long as he looks good when I go visit, or my friend, who is a local humane officer does the same.

Although I am a believer in barefoot, I do recognize that ALL horses cannot go barefoot, and to imply that a farrier is no good because they say that is a bit ignorant. Unless you personally know this horse, you cannot say what this horse needs.

Oh-and BTW-My horses are not barefoot "to save money".

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post #8 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 11:18 AM
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There are some horses who can't go barefoot no matter who does them.
Doesn't mean the farrier is no good and should be fired.without pictures its hard to tell
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post #9 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 11:26 AM
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Not all horses can be barefoot. Its a fact of life. I had a horse that no matter what we did for her she HAD to have bar shoes. She would go fall on her face lame barefoot. The vet, lameness specialist, 2 barefoot trimmers and a natural balance farrier said she had to have shoes to be in work. Even in a sand indoor arena.

I suspect there is a reason this horse has shoes. For all you know he could be nevicular or some other issue that needs corrective shoeing.

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post #10 of 17 Old 03-12-2013, 11:46 AM
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There are other ways besides a nailed on metal shoe to protect a foot that is certainly valid and can improve hoof health and retain soundness. Casting for example with or without the nifty inserts they make. Rubber shoes. Hoof boots. Chances are, the horse isnt being shod properly or at a proper time interval for his feet if he constantly has LOOSE shoes and is throwing them. Someone isnt thinking outside the box or willing to spend the money it takes or simply put some bell boots on the horse if he is being shod properly. Im betting he has long toes and under run heels as many many many of them do that have these problems and it isnt being recognized or there is a diet problem that isnt allowing good hoof growth. Very very few horses actually have genetically bad feet. They have poorly kept feet (environment and/or trimming applied) and poorly fed feet (even if the horse looks fat and healthy) .

If he is ok (IE sound) to ride with a loose or thrown shoe, Someone is dropping the ball on this. Period.
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Last edited by Trinity3205; 03-12-2013 at 11:50 AM.
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