Thrush.
   

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Thrush.

This is a discussion on Thrush. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Stall or pasture horses with frog thrush?
  • Thrush and heat in feet

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  • 1 Post By Inga
  • 1 Post By loosie

 
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    09-16-2012, 03:35 PM
  #1
Yearling
Thrush.

Okay, so I was over to the barn today and I was looking forward to a nice ride with Indie and then I was planning on giving her a bath afterwards.

The first bit started out fine, she met me halfway in the pasture and all was good.. up until I messed up the hind right leg polo wrap, so I took it off to re-wrap it.

Keep in mind that the hind right has the worst case of thrush (all feet are currently being treated under the farrier's recommendation). She continued to lift up her leg each time I went near it, almost trying to kick me. I figured I'd see if I could walk her out of her "stubborn-ness" but it didn't work, so I had a sneaking suspicion that her foot might be bothering her. Instead of trying again (after the tenth or so attempt), I went to go give her a bath.. but nope, she kept kicking up her hind leg when I tried spraying them. She's never done this as I hose her off after every ride.

I know the farrier said that the solution (I'm trying to remember what the product is called.. I want to say Copper Care but I forget) has a bit of a wang so she might grow to dislike it so maybe that could be it too.

Either way, I brought her back into the barn to put the stuff in the crevices of her hooves where the farrier showed me to put it. While I was holding her feet, she'd often try putting them back down. It wasn't too bad with the front but she wasn't happy about me putting it in the right hoof.

I can't imagine it's a respect issue or anything because she seems to be respecting me quite well, and I recently read that whether or not your horse comes to you in the pasture also has a role played in respect. I think it's the fact of the thrush and maybe the product making her feet a little more sore/sensitive, but I really want other opinions. Any other questions, feel free to ask as well if that helps you with a suggestion.

Thank you
     
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    09-16-2012, 04:05 PM
  #2
Yearling
Sounds like she is just in pain. How long have you been treating her thrush? Is she in a wet pasture? If this treatment isn't working, maybe it is time for another treatment. Also, are you picking out his feet every single day? This is very important to get rid of thrush and to prevent it from happening in the first place. Keeping them clean and dry is the key.
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    09-16-2012, 04:09 PM
  #3
Yearling
We just started applying the treatment yesterday, so she's been treated twice. And no, her pasture at the moment is quite dry and I make sure to dry her hooves off when I hose her down. She just had her feet done yesterday so the farrier had suggested the treatment. I'm hoping to see a bit of improvement in a week or two, but I really hope that the product itself isn't causing this sudden sensitivity.
     
    09-22-2012, 03:38 AM
  #4
Trained
I would not use a product like that on thrushy frogs generally, especially on deep cases. Your farrier is right to say it 'wangs'(I'm taking that to mean sting), if it comes in contact with sensitive tissue, which is likely in the case of bad thrush. Anything too strong like this can also damage that live tissue & slow or ****** new healthy horn growth. On really deep cases I'd use something like Pete's Goo or such, until there's a good couple of layers of healthy tissue. Keeping the horse on dry standing if at all possible will help too.
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    09-22-2012, 07:53 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
You don't have to have wet ground for the horse to develop thrush. You can be in the middle of a drought and still have a horse develop thrush

There are lots of single reasons and combinations of those single reasons as to why Horse "A" develops thrush and Horse "B" does not --- or they both do.

1. Ground conditions. The Ph balance is way off on our land; it is very acidic. Acidic equals a breeding ground for bacterial/fungal "things".

When the ground is hot, the heat carries up into the hoof that is standing on it. Since frogs do have blood pumping thru them, they hold a bit of moisture by nature.

So you have the heat from the ground the frog is standing on, permeating up into the frog that will retain a bit of moisture anyway, and along comes the possibility of thrush.

2. Diet. Diet can make a huge difference in some horses. Too much starch in grain-based products.

3. Cleanliness of stalls. If the horse comes in for any part of the day or night, the urine in the shavings can further aggravate the problem. I have one horse with chronic thrush issues.

He has the run-in stall with grid mats on top of limestone crush. Even though his stall is picked clean of manure every day, I have to change his shavings every three days to keep his shavings dry.

He has 22 acres of high and dry pasture to run on, so it isn't like he is confined to a small dirt area that is overcrowded with horses.

4. Immune System is certainly far from the least of issues. Horses with weakened immune systems (no matter how good you feed them) are more likely to be prone to thrush.

The horse I mentioned in #3 three has environmental and food allergies, so it's no surprise I battle thrush on him. He also has a less-than-grade 1 club hoof which, they are prone to thrush.

Depending on the severity of the thrush there are products on the market that are non-invasive to the healthy tissue.

1. Absorbine Hooflex "Thrush Remedy" is as non-invasive yet helpful as a product can get. It is oil-based so does not dry the hoof out. After picking and brushing the hooves clean, I apply it, then let the horse stand while I brush him and get him ready for turnout; giving the product ample time to soak in.

I use it on the hooves as a preventative, a couple times a week, during the hot/humid months. I don't have near as many issues during the wet/cold months as I do during the warmer months.

Absorbine Hooflex Thrush Remedy Absorbine (Farrier Hoof Care - Thrush Treatment)

Tractor Supply also carries this product.

If the horse has he's-going-lame issues, it's time for something else.

White Lightening is a good soaker for serious thrush issues. I've never used it but I have never heard anything bad about it.

ToMorrow (for cow mastitis) does wonders. I have used it with huge success on my thrush-prone horse. I've seen it in Tractor Supply, I have bought it at my local Co-Op but we are very rural and they cater to the cattle farmers.

Soaking the hooves in Betadyne/water/clorox helps. Use enough Betadyne to make the water almost black but only a capful of clorox; all that in about a gallon of water.

I have a three inch deep rubber pan that I use. You only need enough water to barely cover the heel bulbs; it's the bottom and the sulci (crack between the heel bulbs) that you need to soak.

All my horses will stand still to soak their hooves but when I was teaching them, a wheel-barrow full of hay in front of their noses did wonders to get them to stand still

I hope this helps and hasn't been too overwhelming
     
    09-22-2012, 10:36 AM
  #6
Weanling
I really like the product "No Thrush" it's a powder that stays put and works really well, really fast. You can google them and also watch their product video. Good luck! I hope her pain resolved quickly
     

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