Thrush, Sliced Frog?
 
 

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Thrush, Sliced Frog?

This is a discussion on Thrush, Sliced Frog? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Horse frog cut
  • Horse thrush in frog cut pus

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  • 1 Post By Skyseternalangel

 
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    05-02-2012, 01:12 PM
  #1
Foal
Thrush, Sliced Frog?

I have been battling mild thrush for a few months now, its been such a mild winter that the ground almost never froze, and when it did snow, it would melt leaving pastures muddy for almost 4 months straight, then spring rain... Anyways! I have been beginning to realize my horses frog was not in the greatest shape, not ideal, but nothing to worry about, I just continued to treat the thrush and with Thrush Busters and making sure to always clean him up and keep on top of picking out his feet. He goes outside all day and comes in at night. He is a VERY VERY SLOPPY horse and although his stall gets cleaned everyday he still gets manure packed in there, I do pick his feet out everyday. 24 hr turn out is a no go, and I can not go to clean his stall more then once a day. It is bedded well but still, horses are horses!

A few weeks ago I brought my horse in from the pasture and all was good. I started to prepare for riding and picked out his foot, as I was gently picking out his foot he jumped out of the way and wouldn't put his left front hoof. The frog was slightly torn on the inside, and there was a VERY VERY slight amount of blood. I was dumb founded, I jogged him and he was dead lame. No heat in the leg or hoof. There seemed to be something (looked like blood) coming in small amounts from under the frog. The left part of the frog seemed to be torn open, but not torn off. It did not really seem that thrush was to be the cause, or the frog. It was thought to be an abscess, so I treated it as so. Soaking it in Epsom salts, mixed with a little betadine, packed it with icthamol and wrapped it up to keep it clean. When my horse previously had an abscess it drained quickly and all was good. I continued to do this for 3x and it didn't seem to get better.

I called my farrier and he came and looked at the hoof. He felt the hoof and said it felt hot ( I suspect it was only warm because it had been wrapped up for 23.5 hours a day for 3 days) and suspected an abscess. He acknowledged that there was some slight Thrush and recommended that once we get rid of the suspected abscess we consider packing the hoof and putting a pad on for a cycle ( my horse is regularly just shod all around ). My horse seemed to be getting better with my soaking and eventually appeared to be sound. I gave him a few days off and went on a light trail ride a few days later. He was sound, but acting semi out of character. I figured he just had to much time off and just walked around outside for awhile figuring id school him throughout the week. I went back to work, he had probably 2 more days off and I went back to ride.

It was really rainy so the horses did not get turned out and I decided to free lunge my horse to let him stretch before riding and to be surprise he was dead lame. My barn owner noticed as well and stated that he had noticed my horse walking strange a few days ago and picked up the hoof and noticed a wood chip stuck near the hoof bulb, he pulled it out and walked my horse into his stall figuring that was the reason for the funny walk. I cleaned my horses hoof fully, nothing was stuck in the hoof, but he was still lame. No heat, no puss, but an abnormally funky smell, different from thrush. I figured maybe the stench was from the fact that horses hoofs are touching nasty surfaces all the time. The vet came a few days later and I decided to get her opinion well she was here! She examined the hoof and cut off the part of the frog that looked torn, there was some nasty puss and discharge and she scraped excess parts of the hoof off.

She stated that "a sensitive part" or the hoof was exposed and that he would not be sound on it until it grew back. She recommended that I put a pad on the hoof to protect it and pack it with copper sulfate because she did acknowledge that there was some bacteria. She stated that she believed the hoof had been sliced and then bacteria got in the hoof. She cleaned the hoof extensively, told me to pack it with betadine and cotton to kill anything in there, then put a pad on so the hoof can grow back. She expressed her dislike for pads, but stated it was the only real option. I have been packing the hoof and getting it clean. I decided that I did not want to put a pad on, because I want to monitor the hoof and its progress and did not like the fact that the pad could trap moisture and I would not be able to see inside the hoof for over 6 weeks. I have been wrapping the hoof in a diaper duck tape boot, then putting a hoof boot over it so that he can go outside if it is dry. The hoof has been staying extremely clean, and dry for 1 week now.

He is sound with the duck-tape boot on, as long as nothing is in the hoof to push against the sensitive tissue. I am not riding him and another farrier told me that it should take about 2-3 weeks for the area to cover back up and grow back. I was wondering if anyone had ever experienced this, your experiences and opinions. I have attached three pictures. The hoof is redish because a) the shoe is starting to rust because its been soaking and not wearing down, the farrier and vet said its fine for now, b) the hoof is orangish/red from the betadine I use to keep it clean.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hoofx2.jpg (21.2 KB, 370 views)
File Type: jpg hoofx3.jpg (25.9 KB, 365 views)
File Type: jpg HOOOF.jpg (26.9 KB, 347 views)
     
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    05-03-2012, 11:30 PM
  #2
Trained
Hi,

Sorry to say, I didn't read all your post, because I find it hard without adequate punctuation & paragraphs.

Thrush is an opportunistic infection, so if feet are otherwise healthy & the horse has a healthy diet & balanced nutrition, they don't tend to be very susceptible to thrush. As you've said his manure is very sloppy, first & foremost I'd be looking at diet & nutrition - something's not right there & I'd suspect hind gut acidosis if he's always got the runs.

It would be good to provide him with at least some dry footing when he's out if that's possible. Soaking his feet in a very strong solution of salt water will help dry them out & cope better with the wet footing, as well as being a mild antiseptic without damaging healthy tissue like chemicals such as thrush buster can.

Deep central sulcus thrush can indeed bleed, by damaging/weakening the tissue enough that it can become easily injured. He could have otherwise cut it too. Your pics show a rather contracted & apparently run forward feet(maybe not accurate, as I know pics can give false ideas) with the shoes set too far forward. I'd consider getting his shoes off, at least until his feet can become healthy, or at least keeping him shod in better balance.
     
    05-03-2012, 11:34 PM
  #3
Showing
Yeah those feet need treatment for thrush.

Here is a forum member that has a very similar issue:

Deep Sulcus Thrush - the nightmare begins

But basically dry footing is a must. If he's out in the mud, find someplace for him to have dry footing a few hours of the day. Then find a product to work within the crack (I usually stuff it full of cotton and then apply thrush buster or something else) and pick their hooves out deeply to keep them clean and breathing.

I've just started using NoThrush on my horse and it works great. But there are many products out there that can do the same thing. Give her thread a read for all of the advice offered so you can get started ASAP.
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    12-14-2012, 03:00 PM
  #4
Yearling
This is a thought, what would happen if you cleaned a horse's feet thoroughly, next applied something like "No-Thrush" (dry powder) then put boots on him that had more "No-Thrush" in the bottom... Would the boots keep the hoofs dry enough to heal like they should or would it be more like a haven for bacteria?
     
    12-15-2012, 07:37 PM
  #5
Trained
^^Depends on the environment as to whether boots would prevent moisture getting in for a start, but yes, that could be a possible answer.
     
    12-15-2012, 09:21 PM
  #6
Yearling
I was just curious. :) I wouldn't think the boots would even have to be special just tight or long enough to not let moisture in? Of course it would be wise/necessary to check the hoof daily and replace the dry thrush treatment. At least I would think that would be an option in the winter when everything is frozen hard.
     
    12-16-2012, 06:17 AM
  #7
Trained
No, most boots aren't at all water tight - & soaking boots that are, aren't designed to be worn for long periods, let alone 24/7. Hooves, especially waterlogged ones, sweat in them too. So it's far from ideal, and you would need to not just check them daily, but take the boots off, clean & dry the feet & allow them some time daily to stand without them in dry footing. I'd suggest doing it twice daily actually. But it's a valid option if it's the 'better evil'.
     

Tags
bacteria, frog, thrush, torn frog

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