Time To Switch Farriers?
   

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Time To Switch Farriers?

This is a discussion on Time To Switch Farriers? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Note explaining you are switching farriers
  • How to use nippers on horse hind feet

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    02-28-2012, 07:17 PM
  #1
Started
Time To Switch Farriers?

I'm fairly certain it's time to switch farriers. Am I thinking right?

My farrier right now I was happy with, at first. Now it seems he's getting sloppy. He's leaving my horses heels really long and he's been trimming the back feet in a spade shape.

He also, I feel, just doesn't do a good job for the money we're paying($40 a trim) all he does is come over pick up the horses' feet uses the nippers then files and he's done. Doesn't give them a mustang roll(which I asked for), doesn't check the angles, and doesn't watch them move out before and after the trim. He doesn't even glance at the hoof to see if he's doing a good job or not. Overall(after learning more since I've been doing my research) he is not doing a very good job and he leaves sharp and wonky edges.

Also I had been thinking of shoeing Tbird this Spring and summer but ended up switching to hoof boots(to save money) and found out from a few people who used to use him for shoeing stopped because he was constantly driving nails into the horses' feet!

My friend recommended her farrier and has nothing but good things to say about him so I met him while he was trimming her horses one day. Needless to say I am in LOVE with this farrier!

He has you bring the horse towards him and away from him at a walk and a trot before and after the trim. During the trim he takes the time to explain what he's doing and why he's doing it and is always checking to make sure the hoof angles are right for the horse. He takes his time and does a really, really good job. Hooves all looked beautiful when he was finished. I watched him do all six of their horses and he explained the difference between their hooves and the angles and everything! HIs price is $30.

I asked my friend if he does all of this every time he comes out and not just because someone different was there(he didn't know I was going to be there) and she said yup, every single time.

He was also very nice and personable and easy to talk to or ask questions to while my farrier now has kind of a "let's get this over with" attitude.

So...... I'm right for thinking to switch right?
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    02-28-2012, 07:20 PM
  #2
Trained
If you're seeing things you don't like about his work, like LHLT which can lead to navicular, change farriers. You have the luxury of choice, use it.
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    02-28-2012, 07:26 PM
  #3
Foal
You are very right to switch. Your farrier should be like your friend. It should be easy to talk to him, no awkward silences, and he should explain everything he is doing to your horse. If you suggest one thing and he doesn't do it, he should at least explain himself to you. I recently switched to a farrier that sounds a lot like the one you are thinking of switching to, and I love it. I actually look forward to talking to him.

Cheaper. Personable. Knowledgible. Professional. Make the switch, for you and your horse. The both of you will be much happier.
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    02-28-2012, 07:28 PM
  #4
Green Broke
You might get a better answer if you posted pics of your horse and his work?
There might be a reason for his work, then again he might be sloppy because a trim is easy money...
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    02-28-2012, 07:50 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantomcolt18    
he's been trimming the back feet in a spade shape.
And that's bad why. What function do the hind feet serve? What shape is the coffin bone in a hind foot?

Quote:
He also, I feel, just doesn't do a good job for the money we're paying($40 a trim) all he does is come over pick up the horses' feet uses the nippers then files and he's done.
What's he suposed to do, chew the foot off w/ his teeth?

Quote:
doesn't check the angles,
You mean w/ a guage? One that can read differently than the brand new one right next to it on the shelf of the farrier supply house, not to mention the next ten farriers down the line?

Quote:
and doesn't watch them move out before and after the trim.
So he moves from horse to horse instead of having you bring them to him?

Quote:
He doesn't even glance at the hoof to see if he's doing a good job or not.
He trims blind folded, or just w/ his eyes closed?

Quote:
Overall(after learning more since I've been doing my research) he is not doing a very good job and he leaves sharp and wonky edges.
Perhaps after doing your research, you should consider doing your own trimming.

Quote:
found out from a few people who used to use him for shoeing stopped because he was constantly driving nails into the horses' feet!
Goodness, that's terrible. To think one would try to hold a shoe on w/ nails. Maybe they were cheap to and didn't want to pay the extra expence for glue.

Quote:
He has you bring the horse towards him and away from him at a walk and a trot before and after the trim. During the trim he takes the time to explain what he's doing and why he's doing it and is always checking to make sure the hoof angles are right for the horse. He takes his time and does a really, really good job. Hooves all looked beautiful when he was finished. I watched him do all six of their horses and he explained the difference between their hooves and the angles and everything! HIs price is $30.
Sounds like a match made in heaven.
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    02-28-2012, 08:11 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I seem to be missing something, He does a crappy job, doesnt do what you ask, leaves rough edges, and yet you hand him money ?
Seriously ? Are you paying in advance or something ?
Your farrier is doing a crappy quick job because you are paying him to do a crappy quick job. STOP IT !.
Don't pay him until the job is done to your satisfaction.
We have a saying in the Army. A soldier does what a Sergeant checks, well you basically arnt checking squat, and handing him money means you approve.
     
    02-28-2012, 08:17 PM
  #7
Foal
Bntnail, there's no need for such a snarky post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
And that's bad why. What function do the hind feet serve? What shape is the coffin bone in a hind foot?
I will not comment on the type of trim, but I will say this; the farrier should explain everything they do so that the client is not confused by what they are doing. That makes a bad farrier IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
What's he suposed to do, chew the foot off w/ his teeth?
I don't know, I expect my farriers not only to trim but also talk. My current farrier knows I am training my horse in reining and talks to me about that, and asks me about how his trim jobs have affected her performance. He asks me about her legs and if she has one that steps different from the others. He makes sure his job is satisfactory and that she is moving correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
You mean w/ a guage? One that can read differently than the brand new one right next to it on the shelf of the farrier supply house, not to mention the next ten farriers down the line?
My farrier will trim my horse's feet, and once she puts it down he looks to how she is standing on it. He compares it with my mare's other feet to make sure they are even. He doesn't use a gauge, but he still glances at her feet to be sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
So he moves from horse to horse instead of having you bring them to him?
A good farrier will watch a horse move if necessary, particularly if they have corrective shoeing or trimming.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
Perhaps after doing your research, you should consider doing your own trimming
Not everyone wants to deal with this. I prefer to pay someone to do it for me. With my horse in competition, her feet are important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
Goodness, that's terrible. To think one would try to hold a shoe on w/ nails. Maybe they were cheap to and didn't want to pay the extra expence for glue.
Did you know a horse has a quick, and that by hitting it you make them bleed and cause them pain? They go lame for weeks if not months. There was a farrier here that hit the quick on 5 horses in a row at my barn, and they had to wait out several big shows because of lameness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
Sounds like a match made in heaven.
Yes, god forbid a farrier be actually interested in their job and personable with their clients and concerned with the horses they work with.

Excuse me for being picky with the people I choose to mess with my $10,000 animal's feet. I want them to both know what they are doing and explain their process to me. If that is too much to ask, then they do not get my money. I pay them for a reason.

I do not speak for the OP, but if they were satisfied with their farrier they would not have made this post. An unsatisfied customer is an unsatisfied customer for whatever reason. If people are unsatisfied with you, then you are not doing a good business.
     
    02-28-2012, 08:26 PM
  #8
Green Broke
I don't find it snarky, I think he brings up good points.

It is hard being a shoer, because it seems that the owners always seem to know more about shoeing than the farriers.
If that is truly the case they would be shoeing their own horses and not hiring someone to do it...IMO..
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    02-28-2012, 08:31 PM
  #9
Green Broke
I am not trying to be ****ty but after shoeing a few horses myself and trying to learn, it is well worth the money to have someone that knows what they are doing to it for you.

I think it isn't fair to judge unless we see the guys work(right after it is done) to be able to offer a proper evaluation.
     
    02-28-2012, 09:47 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanala    
bntnail, there's no need for such a snarky post.
I just replied to it the way I read it.



Quote:
I will not comment on the type of trim, but I will say this; the farrier should explain everything they do so that the client is not confused by what they are doing. That makes a bad farrier IMO.
I fix alot of things w/o even thinking about it, no explanation given unless I think there is a potential problem. If a customer has specific concerns/questions they should ask. If they don't, then I'm a bad farrier?



Quote:
I don't know, I expect my farriers not only to trim but also talk.
So If I was a deaf mute then I couldn't be your farrier?

Quote:
My current farrier knows I am training my horse in reining and talks to me about that, and asks me about how his trim jobs have affected her performance. He asks me about her legs and if she has one that steps different from the others. He makes sure his job is satisfactory and that she is moving correctly.
And if you note problems between visits, do you tell him or let him troll around untill he asks the right question?



Quote:
My farrier will trim my horse's feet, and once she puts it down he looks to how she is standing on it. He compares it with my mare's other feet to make sure they are even. He doesn't use a gauge, but he still glances at her feet to be sure.
Then your farrier doesn't shoe blind folded.

Just to clarify, is your farrier a he or she?



Quote:
A good farrier will watch a horse move if necessary,
I would argue that it is necessary to watch a horse move to be a good farrier.

Quote:
particularly if they have corrective shoeing or trimming.
All shoeing/trimming is corrective.



Quote:
Not everyone wants to deal with this. I prefer to pay someone to do it for me.
So you could do it better, you just choose not to?

Quote:
With my horse in competition, her feet are important.
All horses feet are important, competition or not.



Quote:
Did you know a horse has a quick, and that by hitting it you make them bleed and cause them pain?
OMG, I better go back to farrier school! Wait, I never went.
I guess being a second generation farrier has it's perks.

Quote:
Excuse me for being picky with the people I choose to mess with my $10,000 animal's feet.
Good, you got to drop a number.
Get to 80,000 grand plus and I might be impressed. I might even consider working for you,,,,,,,,,for a while.

Quote:
I do not speak for the OP, but if they were satisfied with their farrier they would not have made this post. An unsatisfied customer is an unsatisfied customer for whatever reason. If people are unsatisfied with you, then you are not doing a good business.
Sounded to me like they had made up their mind prior to their post.
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