Update on Candy - Deep Sulcus Thrush
 
 

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Update on Candy - Deep Sulcus Thrush

This is a discussion on Update on Candy - Deep Sulcus Thrush within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
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    06-18-2012, 07:52 AM
  #1
Weanling
Update on Candy - Deep Sulcus Thrush

I've been treating Candy for thrush for 60 days now. She has contracted heels, long toes and underrun heels.

I have been using a product called No Thrush daily for 60 days. It is a dry powder treatment and although it was initially great, her hooves have appeared to stop improving.

I am still using No Thrush, but have started with Apple Cider Vinegar soaks and have also tried iodine soaks.

She is going into the clinic on Wednesday to have X-Rays to view any underlying pathology that could be causing the heel pain (ie, navicular).
Needless to say her breeding is definitely a contributer to the problem, halter breed for an enormous, stocky body and tiny teacup hooves.

Anyway, the vet would like to put shoes on her to provide some immediate relief and support, but I prefer a more natural approach with boot therapy and correct trimming if IT IS navicular. Shoes would be difficult to apply at this point in time as she has virtually no weight baring structure (hoof wall). THIS is because she was suffering whiteline on all four hooves after the onset of the thrush, so the farrier removed most of the hoof wall to open the area up to oxygen and prevent further damage..

When she was getting her feet done, there was particular pain in the front left, which he decided to clip as far as possible to the point where she was bleeding to try and encourage what he thought was an abscess out. I poulticed and bandaged this hoof for the next 2 days, no abscess ever appeared. I have not got this farrier back.

After this trim the poor horse could barely walk (bleeding, almost no natural weight-baring structure) and it broke my heart as she was in substantial pain for the next 2-3 weeks. Now that her hooves have grown out a bit she is feeling better, I bought some high density foam from the vet to tape to the bottom of her hooves for 3 days for cushioning and support, the relief was almost instantaneous and after I removed these she was walking 100% better.

I hope keeping positive for Wednesday and hoping for the best, but the horse is showing all clinical signs of navicular... we are just waiting on a official diagnosis now.

I will attach photos, from day 1 of diagnosis through to about a couple of weeks ago. These are the front right, which was the worst originally, now the left is the worst...




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    06-18-2012, 07:59 AM
  #2
Weanling
Will get some shots of the left soon!
     
    06-18-2012, 08:40 AM
  #3
Showing
I actually came across the same problem! My lessee reported NoThrush stopped working and so I stumbled across this on Pete Ramey's article (He's well known in the Hoof Community)

Quote:
"For years I've searched for the perfect thrush medicine. Most products that kill the fungi and bacteria also kill living tissue; contributing to the problem. I use a 50/50 mix of Triple Antibiotic Ointment and Athletes Foot Cream (1% Clotrimazole) (for humans; over the counter at any pharmacy). I mix it thoroughly and put it in a 60cc catheter-tip syringe (available from any vet) (The syringe may well be more important than the cream, as it allows deep penetration to the core of the problem). Mix the products in a Tupperware bowl, then spoon in or 'top load' 15cc with a butter knife. I have my horse owners treat deep into central cleft daily until no cleft is present. No need to squirt it all over the frog; just a pea-sized dab at the very bottom of the central sulcus. To date, I've seen it eliminate deep, sensitive central frog clefts in 100% of cases within 2 months. (A first, with every treatment I've ever used, though past experience tells me we'll never find a product that works on every case in every environment.)"
If you are interested in reading more about hooves (I've been reading close to 4 hours now)
http://tinyurl.com/Hoove-Articles


Will see if my lessee wants to give it a go.

Good luck!! :)

Edit: Wow.. I cannot use grammar at 11:40pm at night LOL.. excuse me!
     
    06-18-2012, 11:44 AM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyRC123    


Anyway, the vet would like to put shoes on her to provide some immediate relief and support, but I prefer a more natural approach with boot therapy and correct trimming if IT IS navicular.


What is it that makes you think there is anything "natural" about hoof boots?


Quote:
Shoes would be difficult to apply at this point in time as she has virtually no weight baring structure (hoof wall). THIS is because she was suffering whiteline on all four hooves after the onset of the thrush, so the farrier removed most of the hoof wall to open the area up to oxygen and prevent further damage..
Notice that the 'whiteline disease', or more specifically, the wall separation that provided opportunity for infection, does not appear until after the first trim (2nd photo).

Nothing was done to address that distal wall separation until the pathology had progressed through the 6th photo (5 trims?).

Even then, the problem was poorly addressed and more importantly, no structural support was subsequently provided after the medial wall was removed. The horse was left to bear all medial load on the sole of the foot.


Quote:
After this trim the poor horse could barely walk (bleeding, almost no natural weight-baring structure) and it broke my heart as she was in substantial pain for the next 2-3 weeks.
Good example of why I am such a strong advocate of farrier licensing and regulation.

Quote:
I hope keeping positive for Wednesday and hoping for the best, but the horse is showing all clinical signs of navicular... we are just waiting on a official diagnosis now.
An 'official' diagnosis of navicular disease is rarely definitive, often swamped in the more vague generalization of navicular syndrome. Translation... something hurts in the caudal aspect of the foot but we're not sure what the specific problem is.

Quote:
I will attach photos, from day 1 of diagnosis through to about a couple of weeks ago. These are the front right, which was the worst originally, now the left is the worst...
What is it about barefoot trimmers that makes them think the distal wall is ornamental?

This thread could just have easily been titled "How to Transform the Horse Hoof into a Mule Hoof in 7 Natural Steps!".






Should licensing ever occur in the US, it would likely (hopefully) be modeled after the UK system of regulation. That said, the most likely exam criteria would be based on the current AFA farrier certification process.

It's fair to ask, how many practicing 'Natural Barefoot Trimmers' could pass that exam today?

I'd safely bet large sums of money that the answer is zero, zip and none.

Still, horse owners continue to engage these practitioners.

Barnum and Bailey were right.

Cheers,
Mark



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    06-18-2012, 10:19 PM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    


What is it that makes you think there is anything "natural" about hoof boots?
Maybe this?

New Page 3

That's the direction my farrier and I are going in.
     
    06-19-2012, 07:17 PM
  #6
Trained
Tomorrow Dry Cow works great for thrush. Don't know if you can get that where you are. Don't know if you can get that over there.
     
    06-20-2012, 01:59 AM
  #7
Foal
I see a lot of bar covering over the sole of the hoof. Partial evidence of this is the appearance of the frog is being choked near the apex. Bars will cause navicular pain when they have been allowed to grow over the sole or embed themselves into the sole. I did not read through the entire thread but would imagine this is a problem for any discomfort this horse is having.

Something else that stands out to me about the trim is the medial toe pillar appears to be a bit tall causing separation in the white line.

I would also recommend White Lightning treatments without the use of adding water as per the manfacturers instructiosn and keep the hoof as dry as possible. You could follow up by sifting No Thrush into a diaper and placing the hoof in a Hoof Wrap or Deluxe Equine Slipper to keep them dry throughout the day.

Hope this helps,
Linda M
     
    06-20-2012, 11:15 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoofMechanic    
I see a lot of bar covering over the sole of the hoof. Partial evidence of this is the appearance of the frog is being choked near the apex. Bars will cause navicular pain when they have been allowed to grow over the sole or embed themselves into the sole. I did not read through the entire thread but would imagine this is a problem for any discomfort this horse is having.

Something else that stands out to me about the trim is the medial toe pillar appears to be a bit tall causing separation in the white line.

I would also recommend White Lightning treatments without the use of adding water as per the manfacturers instructiosn and keep the hoof as dry as possible. You could follow up by sifting No Thrush into a diaper and placing the hoof in a Hoof Wrap or Deluxe Equine Slipper to keep them dry throughout the day.

Hope this helps,
Linda M
Can you explain how the bars of the foot would cause navicular pain ? Out of all the clinicians I've listened too and the vets I work for I have not heard the first one say the bars of the foot would cause navicular pain.
     
    06-20-2012, 12:57 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cotton    
Can you explain how the bars of the foot would cause navicular pain ?
It's a species differentiation Cotton.

Unlike the domestic horse, the South Florida Unicorn has no need for a digital cushion or DDFT. The bars are connected directly to the navicular bone and, much like the distal wall, serve only an ornamental function. Excess bar growth can occur when unicorns over-indulge in purple colored Skittles. On the rare occasion that a unicorn does experience Skittle induced, excess bar growth, that growth can indeed cause direct pressure on the navicular bone.

Treatment by certified hoof mechanics involve having a specially trained garden gnome hug the unicorn while members of the lollipop guild sing the theme song to "The Wizard of Oz".

Treatment is repeated every two weeks until the unicorn sheds a rainbow colored teardrop of relief.

Quote:
Out of all the clinicians I've listened too and the vets I work for I have not heard the first one say the bars of the foot would cause navicular pain.
Such practitioners are too imbued in the archaic dogma of anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. Their tunnel vision approach to science prevents them from understanding the natural beauty and holistic approach necessary to achieve universal harmony.

A true hoof mechanic has the ability to not only cure navicular disease with a trim and padded hoof boots, but, per this website New Page 3 ...

"This situation is where the boots and pads become truly magical. We make a horse owner cry big happy tears at almost every clinic we teach."

Vets and farriers are too pragmatic to make horse owners cry big happy tears.

Besides, what horse owner would ever believe that a modern farrier had even heard of the magic of barefoot trims, hoof boots and frog support?

These are brand new ideas that no one had ever thought of until old Pete's failure as a farrier turned him to the magic of barefoot trims, boots and most importantly, the power of internet marketing.



PegasusTV - In Celebration of the Horse - Burney Chapman and the Heart Bar Shoe

Anvil Brand Shoe Co. - Myron McLane Pads

Castle Plastics Specialty Pads

Cheers,
Mark
waresbear and Cotton like this.
     
    06-20-2012, 01:09 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
For clarification purposes, what exactly is the "distal wall"?
I've seen it brought up on a few different hoof threads and Google was of zero help in figuring out what/where it is...
     

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