Using hoof boots with arena work? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 08-22-2013, 11:34 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
I guess I'm still wondering how a horse with "perfect, healthy" feet can be ouchy in an arena with no rocks in it .
1. there are rocks in the arena
2. like I said in original post...i don't think he is ouchy
3. I said almost perfect

helpful responses are appreciated
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post #22 of 29 Old 08-23-2013, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ktrolson View Post
Like I said in original post...I have not noted this myself. I do not think he has a problem and my farrier agrees. Heck, I team pen on him barefoot with no problems in a worse arena than ours. He's never been bruised or taken a bad step in any way. I think my trainer is just pro-shoe for some reason. All her horses are shod, she's never tried barefoot and knows nothing about the hoof structure or physiology. I think that a lot of trainers can be this way because it's a lot of work to keep horses barefoot and shoes are so much easier. So I am just doing this to keep the peace.
I don't find barefoot any more work than managing a shod horse so I think she needs to explain her reasoning a bit better to you.
Quite honestly its not going to matter which of these boots you go for because they all demand her to bend her back and fiddle about putting them on and then taking them off again which is going to add time to her probably busy schedule
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post #23 of 29 Old 08-23-2013, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Clava View Post
I don't think it is just fortunate to have a horse with good feet, good feet are often only a product of hard work (in terms of getting the diet right and management) and little to do with genetics.

I rescued my horse when she was 18 years old. She had very poor feet when I got her. I didn't know, since she was my first horse, and I used a farrier my vet and my trainer recommended. She had shoes on for one year with horrible shoe work. I have since then educated myself and learned all I could about feet. She has been barefoot for 6 months now. I have relocated her to a large dry lot pasture with a gradual incline. I now have an excellent farrier who works with an excellent trimmer out of an equine podiatry group. I have gone through many boots trying to keep them on and not rubbing or hurting her. She has no heels what so ever. To the point that her heel bulbs are on the ground. That is why I boot her. Her feet hurt. So I am doing all I can. I have her trimmed every 2 weeks or sooner if she needs it. I have put in the hard work and the money and the time so don't judge me.

Genetics do factor in, at least with my horse. She has crooked legs and crooked hooves. Not her fault. She is still the most beautiful horse in the world to me and other people think she is too. Why she was bred I will never know. Probably because she was "so pretty".

I also have her on a good diet for her and supplements as well.
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post #24 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 02:30 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by lightning View Post
I rescued my horse when she was 18 years old. She had very poor feet when I got her. I didn't know, since she was my first horse, and I used a farrier my vet and my trainer recommended. She had shoes on for one year with horrible shoe work. I have since then educated myself and learned all I could about feet. She has been barefoot for 6 months now. I have relocated her to a large dry lot pasture with a gradual incline. I now have an excellent farrier who works with an excellent trimmer out of an equine podiatry group. I have gone through many boots trying to keep them on and not rubbing or hurting her. She has no heels what so ever. To the point that her heel bulbs are on the ground. That is why I boot her. Her feet hurt. So I am doing all I can. I have her trimmed every 2 weeks or sooner if she needs it. I have put in the hard work and the money and the time so don't judge me.

Genetics do factor in, at least with my horse. She has crooked legs and crooked hooves. Not her fault. She is still the most beautiful horse in the world to me and other people think she is too. Why she was bred I will never know. Probably because she was "so pretty".

I also have her on a good diet for her and supplements as well.
There is an awesome series of trimming videos on youtube called trimming to the true anatomy of the hoof. It's not professional video but a wealth of info. Most people leave the toes too long stretching the sole making it thin. This video is invaluable to me!
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post #25 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 03:52 AM
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Thank you. Will watch it.
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post #26 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
I guess I'm still wondering how a horse with "perfect, healthy" feet can be ouchy in an arena with no rocks in it .
Without addressing the original posters question, or targeting her horse... Even the healthiest of hooves sometimes need a period of time to harden up to new/worse terrain. Generally speaking, if the feet are use to a nice arena, it wouldn't be a shock to see ouchies on an occasional rock out there. Again, not addressing the original posters horse, just speaking in general.

This was the case with our mare when transitioning her from shoes over to boots and eventually barefoot. We've had a couple different trimmers (through a move out of state) who've both commented on what great feet she has even directly after removing the shoes. But she was still ouchy when we first removed those shoes and began the transition. We noticed she had more of a hard time with gravel roads. It took 6 months of slowly building up hardness (or maybe you could call it a callous?) on softer roads. She can handle it all now with flying colors. It's been an amazing process to watch unfold.

It's also been so interesting studying the mustang and having them as a reference point as we transitioned over to the barefoot world from using shoes.
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post #27 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by lightning View Post

Genetics do factor in, at least with my horse. She has crooked legs and crooked hooves. Not her fault. She is still the most beautiful horse in the world to me and other people think she is too. Why she was bred I will never know. Probably because she was "so pretty".

I also have her on a good diet for her and supplements as well.
If she has crooked legs and feet then she probably needs to grow crooked hooves to be sound and she might do better with a lot less trimming and letting her self trim so she determines the shape she needs. Do read this blog it is fascinating and very true, but you have to stop thinking that hooves are a certain shape (which farriers and most trimmers can rarely understand)

Read this and the related entries about this hoof and self trimming
Rockley Farm: More on the puzzling hoof
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post #28 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 04:54 AM
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Hi, Thanks I will read it now. I do have a someone that understands crooked legs and feet. My last trimmer trimmed her as though she was not crooked. It is a long process. Current trimmer doesn't want to trim until 4 weeks out unless she starts to flare.
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post #29 of 29 Old 09-02-2013, 05:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lightning View Post
Hi, Thanks I will read it now. I do have a someone that understands crooked legs and feet. My last trimmer trimmed her as though she was not crooked. It is a long process. Current trimmer doesn't want to trim until 4 weeks out unless she starts to flare.

My mare can go months without any formal trimming she keeps her own hooves trimmed and the hinds go an interesting shape (to balance herself) as she is very close coupled behind. I do do a lot of roadwork though and that really helps them to find their own trimmed shape.
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