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Vet is recommending shoes...

This is a discussion on Vet is recommending shoes... within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Ground control horseshoes washer

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    08-16-2013, 03:52 PM
  #21
Yearling
This may get you on the front burner.
"Have I offended you in some way?"
"I thought I may have made you mad and you don't want to come here anymore because sometimes you don't show up, or take so long to get back to me".

It's like a wakeup call.
     
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    08-17-2013, 01:57 PM
  #22
Foal
If you have to shoe your horse for a cycle you could try Ground Control horseshoes. They did a fantastic job of helping my gelding recover from a nasty bruse! He is a cart pony that works out on the pavement regulary. After a longer than usual drive he was left footsore and ouchy for weeks! When I put the GC shoes on him it was a night and day difference in his stride! I had a new pony pulling me! He is currently wearing steel as when I reset his plastic shoes he had a couple of nails pull through the shoe when he slipped in the mud goofing off! I am going to order him a new set for his next trim! I will also be using washers on the rearmost nails to prevent it from happening again ! Otherwise his shoes still lool brand new!
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    08-17-2013, 02:17 PM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayknee    
If you have to shoe your horse for a cycle you could try Ground Control horseshoes. They did a fantastic job of helping my gelding recover from a nasty bruse! He is a cart pony that works out on the pavement regulary. After a longer than usual drive he was left footsore and ouchy for weeks! When I put the GC shoes on him it was a night and day difference in his stride! I had a new pony pulling me! He is currently wearing steel as when I reset his plastic shoes he had a couple of nails pull through the shoe when he slipped in the mud goofing off! I am going to order him a new set for his next trim! I will also be using washers on the rearmost nails to prevent it from happening again ! Otherwise his shoes still lool brand new!
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Ohhh I've seen a little about those and I would be pretty interested in trying those if equisocks don't help! The woman that I talked to about the equisocks also uses those sometimes. I got mine ordered so will hopefully get them put on early next week when they get here :) I'll have to try and take lots of pics
     
    08-17-2013, 03:15 PM
  #24
Started
Farriers who don't show up - not for me!

There's a gal who has a youtube channel - Happy Hoof - who I like: perhaps you'd want to look at her videos & email her for advice.

I think that your vet has a bit of a nerve giving you no reason for her advice to shoe him.

Remember, shoes put 3x the concussive impact to legs, the sole & frog are lifted off ground when they're made to have full contact, and so on: shoes when horses are being used so much that the hooves are wearing down is the rule of thumb.
     
    08-17-2013, 10:02 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
Farriers who don't show up - not for me!

There's a gal who has a youtube channel - Happy Hoof - who I like: perhaps you'd want to look at her videos & email her for advice.

I think that your vet has a bit of a nerve giving you no reason for her advice to shoe him.

Remember, shoes put 3x the concussive impact to legs, the sole & frog are lifted off ground when they're made to have full contact, and so on: shoes when horses are being used so much that the hooves are wearing down is the rule of thumb.
Yeah, my bf is pushing me to call and try and get more reasoning from her or a 2nd opinion from the other vet in the office...I just would rather talk to some farriers about it at this point. She did her job and told me why he was off...

Yes, shoes are the last thing I want on him that's why I'm trying to find better alternatives. I mean if I had to and it really was the only thing that would comfort him I would but I just don't think its the only way to make him comfortable. I've seen horses with WAY worse hooves then he has...

Omg I freaked out today though! I brought him in from the field, I lift up the first foot to clean out and apply durasole to it...THERE WAS A LITTLE ROCK STUCK INTO THE SOLE :( I wanted to cry I felt so bad for the guy. Pulled it out and there was a teeny tiny cut :( It wasn't too deep and I totally over reacted but I just felt so bad for him. But he didn't seem to bothered by it. I put his boots on and took him up into the ring and we played some :) Just in hand. We have a bunch of obstacles in our ring for practicing for judged trail rides haha. We recently built a tent :) So we went in the tent a few times and he did awesome. Was a fun night
     
    08-18-2013, 01:02 PM
  #26
Weanling
This is just my limited opinion on shoes through my research and without any shoeing experience to back it up. Shoeing will make it harder to rehabilitate your horses hooves back to where they need to be. If you want to get him sound you need to do it with him barefoot. And it may take time because you can't take a horse from a soft field and turn him into a gravel cruncher in one day. But with consistent and logical conditioning you will have those hooves rock hard going over all sorts of terrain and in proper shape.

Now that I've said my peace....

Looking at your horses hooves in your hoof critique thread here's what I see. The entire bottom of the hoof is being pulled forward. You need to back up the toe and get the breakover into it's proper position. The heels don't need to grow out, they need to, "relax back into position" basically. This is done by rasping a bevel on the toe to the proper breakover and maintaining the heel height to the live sole plane. You also need to maintain a bevel every week or two to keep the hoof walls. The idea is to never let the hoof wall get into contact with the ground so much so that it is causing leverage and literally pulling the hoof wall away from the coffin bone. OUCH. If you ever notice small cracks between the outer hoof wall and the sole, that's generally proof of excessive leverage in that area. Also as has been mentioned, the hooves aren't balanced all that great.

The best way to learn about where the breakover needs to be is to study ELPO hoof mapping. And I really like to recommend people to watch Linda's videos on youtube. Start with "hoof trimming to the true anatomy of the equine foot part 1" and work your way to the most current date. Here's her channel.... thehappyhoof - YouTube

For the heels the hoof mapping is going to help tremendously. It will allow the whole hoof capsule to begin to "relax" back into it's proper position. Once that long toe is no longer able to pull the entire sole forward it will allow everything to move back into it's proper place. But you need to bring back the heels, which is basically lowering them to the live sole plane. And the bars in your situation look okay, but I would still make sure they are lower than the heel height and properly defined, as in, not laying over at all. Also when you rasp the heels make sure you rasp level to the collateral grooves and not to the sole. There is some concavity in those hooves but it still appears that t, those little cracks are proof of leverage in that area. Even if you don't see any of those small cracks full of dirt I would still maintain the bevel......he collateral groove is deeper in the back of the hoof than it is at the tip of the frog. So basically you will need to rasp the heels with the rasp floating a little bit above the tip/toe of the hoof. This will give you a heel that is on the same plane or parallel to the collateral grooves.
     
    08-18-2013, 01:47 PM
  #27
Started
More of what has already been said. His feet don't look that bad. It doesn't look like he has any callous at all which might be why he is ouchy. During monsoons, my horses feet get really soft because of the rain, and sometimes they will get a stone in the sole like you mentioned. I would keep his feet as dry and clean as you can.
I would definitely get a second opinion before you put shoes on him. I can't believe the vet just told you to put on shoes without more explanation.
     
    08-18-2013, 02:26 PM
  #28
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilamc    
Ohhh I've seen a little about those and I would be pretty interested in trying those if equisocks don't help! The woman that I talked to about the equisocks also uses those sometimes. I got mine ordered so will hopefully get them put on early next week when they get here :) I'll have to try and take lots of pics
Whats nice about them is that they keep the whole foot in play! Unlike a steel shoe which suspends the frog in the air unless you use a frog supporting pad. They also have just the right amount of flex allowing the foot to still act like a barefooted horse but their is still protection for the whole foot. Their simmilar to boots but instead of having to put on and take off boots their on 24/7. The only drawback with them is they can be a pain to clean under. That is easily fixed with a application of Equipac CS in the collateral groves.
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    08-18-2013, 02:42 PM
  #29
Started
"Get Shoes" with no rationale or alternatives is crappy advice. End of story. Maybe it will help, maybe it won't, but saying that isn't really very useful management long term. If she had said, "Hey, his problem is X, and shoes will fix it by doing Y," then okay, maybe it's worth a try.

My gelding is shod all the way around. I am not really a fan of shoes. Sound weird? Yeah, I know it does. My guy is fine barefoot 90% of the time, but is hesitant and tender over gravel. I tried front shoes. Made ZERO difference. Tried all around, and instantly, happy pony who will trot over gravel without hesitation, which I interpret to mean that the gravel made him sore on his back feet, and 'elevating' his soles so they didn't hit it made him comfortable. Unfortunately for my barefoot dreams, the 20+ miles or so we might ride in a week include a fair bit of gravel, so he's shod for now.

How long has your guy been sore? Two weeks? Somehow, shoeing him all around for life seems like a massive overreaction for what is probably just a stone bruise. The fact he was doing well in boots but bruised without says he probably does need some protection when you're on rough footing, but you can do that with or without shoes. And hey, people tell me if you condition properly, some (not all, but probably most) horses can acclimate even to very rough terrain barefoot. I believe them but don't have the time or inclination to try it on my guy quite yet. Might be worthwhile to look into.
     
    08-18-2013, 03:18 PM
  #30
Banned
Have you looked here to try to find a new farrier?

NC Horseshoers Assoc, Inc.
     

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