Wedge shoes
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Wedge shoes

This is a discussion on Wedge shoes within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • How often do you transition down from wedge shoes in horses
  • Wedge in horseshoes

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By loosie

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-14-2012, 01:14 AM
  #1
Yearling
Wedge shoes

Ella has always had quite low heels and now that she's finally learnt to behave for the farrier he suggested wedged shoes all round. Has anyone used these before? He said he would be happy to put straights on but would highly recommend wedges.

Has anyone found any issues with wedges? It all sounds logical to me but thought I'd get a second opinion.

The plan always was to shoe her to fix those feet but while she was in bandages all last year on both hind legs I just couldn't afford it so they were trimmed and maintained. She's deffinately getting shoes on tomorrow only question is straight or wedged.

I should have gotten pics but only realized that once I was home. At the moment they're shocking low sole low heels too much toe weak walls
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-14-2012, 02:03 AM
  #2
Banned
I like wedged shoes, but they won't necessarily fix your horse, unless the farrier is doing things at the same time to encourage heel growth. Hoof supplement, maybe, and cutting down the heel to nothing temporarily, and making extra certain that the shoe is not causing the heel to be contracted. But some horses just naturally don't grow any heel and a slight wedge can get them angled up to where they should be, putting the coffin bone in correct alignment and minimizing joint trauma. It all depends, of course, on the skill of the farrier. I might suggest having radiographs done to assess current bone conditions before doing anything too drastic.
     
    01-14-2012, 02:44 AM
  #3
Trained
[quote=Prinella;1307901]Ella has always had quite low heels and now that she's finally learnt to behave for the farrier he suggested wedged shoes all round. Has anyone used these before? He said he would be happy to put straights on but would highly recommend wedges.
Hi,

I think wedge shoes should be used extremely sparingly, only on hooves that truly need it(probably on vet's advice) & generally only for the short term. Propping horses up onto their toes can cause some pretty major problems. The horse may have low heels due to conformation or injury/posture, in which case attempting to change 'angles' without consideration for what's going on in the body may not be advisable. The horse may also have long but collapsed or 'underrun' heels, in which case I think further pressure from shoes is particularly unhelpful, as is excess toe pressure.

Quote:
The plan always was to shoe her to fix those feet
What's wrong with her feet? Pics? More info? Diet? I generally think of conventional shoes as contraindicative of sick feet & I would strive to 'fix' them before considering shoes generally.
Wallaby likes this.
     
    01-14-2012, 09:13 AM
  #4
Trained
I agree with the first two posters. What fixes low heels is good farrier work, not a wedged shoe. The only legitimate use four a wedged shoe I'm aware of is in the hind for relief of spavin pain in the hock.
My horse has hi/lo and my farriers main thing he works on is getting the lo heel up. My horse is trimmed and reset every 4-5 weeks, and he never really has heel taken off his lo foot... I can't explain well exactly what he does however it has made leaps and bounds of improvement having a very competent farrier. In 6 months or a bit more I've gone from having an uneven horse at the end of the shoeing period to having an even horse the whole way through. His knees used to be different heights at 5 to 6 weeks, now they are even the whole cycle. The hi foot is still small but we are really getting the "runaway" lo foot in check.

A good farrier is worth him and his trucks weight in gold and diamonds as far as I'm concerned. I mentioned a wedge to him once to get the heel up out of sheer frustration and he explained to me why it was a bad idea and continued with his plan and is doing a great job.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-14-2012, 10:33 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prinella    
Ella has always had quite low heels and now that she's finally learnt to behave for the farrier he suggested wedged shoes all round. Has anyone used these before? He said he would be happy to put straights on but would highly recommend wedges.
Yes, I've used them on many horses when circumstance deemed said use appropriate.

Quote:
Has anyone found any issues with wedges? It all sounds logical to me but thought I'd get a second opinion.
Yes. A wedged shoe or pad is designed to restore phalangeal alignment of the distal limb. You've described "quite low heels". I imagine a "broken back" phalangeal alignment, increasing leverage at the caudal aspect of the hoof capsule. Issues can include excess leverage associated with improper use/installation; Excess pressure on sensitive structures in the caudal aspect of the foot; failure to correctly align the distal phalanxes due improper elevation. Footing can negate the mechanical benefits of some wedge orthotics (Soft versus hard footing, rim pad versus wedged shoe heels versus bar wedge pad versus full wedge pad, etc).

Quote:
The plan always was to shoe her to fix those feet but while she was in bandages all last year on both hind legs I just couldn't afford it so they were trimmed and maintained. She's deffinately getting shoes on tomorrow only question is straight or wedged.
You have not provided enough information to answer the question.

Quote:
I should have gotten pics but only realized that once I was home. At the moment they're shocking low sole low heels too much toe weak walls
Photos AND radiographs. Photos provide evidence of phalangeal alignment. Radiographs are statically definitive.

One cannot discuss "low heels" in earnest without understanding tubule length, angulation with respect to dorsal wall tubule growth, hoof capsule geometry (morphology) and conformational loading characteristics. It's like asking "how high is up?".

Is there "too much toe" or is that an illusion associated with a small/negative ventral angle? Are the walls really "weak" or breaking down under forces associated with load imbalance and subsequent capsular distortion? Does "low sole" mean a prolapse of solar material with respect to tubule wall growth, lack of sole tissue depth under the distal phalanx or something else?

Come back with before/after shoeing photos and radiographs. Could make for interesting discourse.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    01-14-2012, 07:57 PM
  #6
Yearling
Thanks for the replies. I know there wasn't alot to go on. Last minute thinking and all.

Putting standards on today at least until her training continues and we can happily ride in larger paddocks. The standards will at least get those soles and bars further off the ground while the feet are fixed.

If possible will avoid the wedges and just use the standards to keep it more comfortable while the feet are slowly repaired.

Thank you for attempting to help with my minimal info. First set of shoes for my pony.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-17-2012, 07:35 PM
  #7
Foal
I've used and love wedge shoes on my horse. But make sure that your farrier is correcting the underrun heel and not just "putting a band-aide" on it by putting wedge shoes on your horse. Also make sure that they fit the shoe well and that it doesn't stick out past the heel bulb, because in my case, my horse was stepping on the backs of his front shoes and pulling them off! So my farrier had to come out every other week to tack them on again. He fixed this problem by shaving down the back of the shoe so that they custom fit my horse....
     
    01-17-2012, 09:01 PM
  #8
Yearling
We ended up putting aluminum straights with a rubber pad underneath on the fronts to get the foot off the ground while it corrects and reduce jarring.
Because she's just been backed we didn't want the wedge shoes because she's often required to do lots of circles especially before I get on and a knowledgeable friend has found the wedges can unbalance them a bit.
Told the farrier this he suggested to leave her sore whilst she's being backed, idiot!

Will hopefully get back on today and see what she thinks about her new feet
Posted via Mobile Device
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shoes v. No Shoes? Need Good Introduction FrannyGlass Horse Health 2 02-18-2011 08:35 PM
Get some bling on them shoes! *Buying a new pair of horse shoes.* myhorsesonador Horse Tack and Equipment 7 02-14-2011 01:25 PM
Looking for saddle blanket with built-in wedge myQHpaul Tack and Equipment Classifieds 1 07-17-2009 09:53 PM
Why you should always get a 2nd opinion - avoid wedge shoes! hotreddun Horse Health 4 07-01-2008 01:42 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0