What Am I Doing Wrong With These Feet? - Page 2
 
 

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What Am I Doing Wrong With These Feet?

This is a discussion on What Am I Doing Wrong With These Feet? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Best treatment for hoof wall seperation
  • What is desitin

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    07-12-2013, 12:39 AM
  #11
Trained
My absolutely favorite site for barefoot trimming is Bare Foot Horse
Check out " do trim" and " white line strategy".

I've recently treated deep sulcus thrush with a goo containing equal parts of triple antibiotic ointment, athlete's foot cream and Monistat ( yup lol) and half a tube of Desitin. All in a big syringe and, after cleaning nicely apply in all cracks and depths once daily. Thrush gone!
     
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    07-12-2013, 12:52 AM
  #12
Trained
I would not exfoliate his soles. I live in very arid territory, so their soles are hard and have extra callus. I only ever take off parts that are easy to take off (as in super easy, about to peel off), otherwise I only remove it around the seat of corn to find the heel height.

To be that tender on gravel (I am picturing pea size gravel) would concern me a bit. But then, I like I said...mine have a reasonably thick hard callus layer - I boot up for rocks, they can travel over gravel just fine. A lot of people put gravel down for their horses feet to "toughen to"....so I guess if they didn't have to toughen to it, there would be no point. :)
     
    07-12-2013, 01:11 AM
  #13
Trained
Oh, and...there is one thing about his hooves you might want to research. The angle of the pastern doesn't "match" the first inch or so of his hoof growth (right below the coronet). There is no shortage of info on this aspect of a healthy hoof, but it will take some "thought" after you understand what the "optimum" is, the exceptions, etc.,. An expert could tell you how to approach/apply/achieve it to his individual "self". It may be fine...and it is just the pictures, but it sure "appears" out of alignment. Either way, I always take things methodically and slow.
     
    07-13-2013, 02:08 AM
  #14
Weanling
He is most tender on very fine pea gravel... slightly "off" on large pea gravel and blackstone type gravels. I plan on getting him some hoof boots to see if that helps.

I will study up on pastern angles too, I take his trimming quite seriously and definitely don't want to hand him off to the local hoof butchers!
     
    07-14-2013, 11:40 AM
  #15
Weanling
Some of the coronet bands look like roller coasters. "hey I like roller coasters" They should be nice and even all the way around the hoof. The one that you can see this most clearly on is the inside of the right front. See how high it is pushed up......then look at the bottom of the RF where the hoof wall meets the sole.....notice all those cracks. There's too much hoof wall touching the ground and it's causing excess pressure which is pushing the coronet bands up in those areas.

The hoof wall will benefit more from having a bevel created from the bottom of the hoof and not just the top. When you round from the top only it looks nice but it's not providing any relief to the bottom of the wall where it's needed most...and when it's left flat like that it creates pressure and it causes tearing and eventually if left too long the seperation will eventually create lamellar wedges.

If you consider the hoof wall growing down at an angle, you want to create a bevel from the bottom, on the hoof wall which will be flat "perpendicular" to the angle which the wall grows down.....not to the angle of the sole. Actually lemme find a video which explains it much better......
It looks like you are doing well....learn elpo hoof mapping and watch Linda's videos, "that's one of her videos I linked to", and take your trimming to the next level. If you watch "hoof trimming to the true anatomy of the equine foot part 1" and work your way forward through her videos you will get a pretty good grasp of hoof mapping.
     
    07-14-2013, 11:45 AM
  #16
Super Moderator
They look excessively trimmed to me and the ridges on the hooves tell of metabolic issues going on which will make horses footy or sensitive. It could be too much sugar in diet possibly from grass or IR issues. The stretched white line causing the holes are also indicative of this.
     
    07-14-2013, 12:08 PM
  #17
Weanling
This is really giving me some food for thought. I'll let his feet grow for a few weeks while I study up so I have enough hoof to apply my learning to.

He has 24/7 turnout on un fertilized native grasses. He receives very little hard feed - just 2 pounds on days when he is worked. I feed a local mill formulation called Lone Star Hi Fat. Where should I start in correcting possible metabolic issues?
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    07-14-2013, 12:23 PM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarpan    
This is really giving me some food for thought. I'll let his feet grow for a few weeks while I study up so I have enough hoof to apply my learning to.

He has 24/7 turnout on un fertilized native grasses. He receives very little hard feed - just 2 pounds on days when he is worked. I feed a local mill formulation called Lone Star Hi Fat. Where should I start in correcting possible metabolic issues?
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Your local ag extension or the internet can id the grass(es) for you (if you don't know what they are already), and give you all of the nutritional info on the grass(es), as well as how much its analysis changes with temperature. Then you can evaluate his diet and adjust, if necessary, from there.
     
    07-14-2013, 12:48 PM
  #19
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarpan    
This is really giving me some food for thought. I'll let his feet grow for a few weeks while I study up so I have enough hoof to apply my learning to.

He has 24/7 turnout on un fertilized native grasses. He receives very little hard feed - just 2 pounds on days when he is worked. I feed a local mill formulation called Lone Star Hi Fat. Where should I start in correcting possible metabolic issues?
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Lots of people over here are testing for cushings as this can be an issue for horses who are struggling, but personally I would experiment with reducing the grass and feeding no grain (nighttime grass has less sugar). Also lots of barefooters in the UK are having success with mineral balancing to forage (test forage then adjust copper, zinc, magnesium etc as necessary). Magnesium can help many footy horses and is also in many laminitic type supplements (also research is being done with humans and magnesium and diabetes ). There is a forum called phoenixhorse which has some very knowledgable folk on it if you want to discuss barefoot things from a different view point
     
    07-14-2013, 01:08 PM
  #20
Weanling
Should I offer hay when reducing his grass? I do have a small dry lot but hate the thought of him penned up for the majority of the time with nothing to eat... Sunset here is about 9pm and sunrise at 6.
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