What's the difference? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

What's the difference?

This is a discussion on What's the difference? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • How to modify a keg shoe for cf test
  • Clip clop horse sounds for my cell phone

Like Tree7Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-22-2012, 08:53 AM
  #11
Foal
Exactly. It may just be me, I don't know. In the past few years I have reccomended shoes to customers for numerous reasons and for moneys sake they don't want to go that route.( Not all of them. But a lot of them ) like I said earlier, I'm not lowering my prices I'm not the most expensive, nor am I the cheapest, I charge what I have to to maintain my business and put food on our table. Right now I don't own a single horse because I don't have the time or money it takes right now to properly take care of one. I wish some horse owners would have that mentality before looking to buy a horse. The one that gets the butt end of the stick is the horse!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-22-2012, 10:20 AM
  #12
Yearling
I will risk persicution, and admit that I will ask about cost before something is done. If I don't have the $$ at that particular moment in time (sometimes bad things happen all at once, and drains the emergency fund) I will ask if there's anything to band-aid until I have the $$. If not I ask if I can work out a payment plan (which my farrier has always been good with. We make him supper when we're around, otherwise he knows we have his favorite treats in the fridge. We try to keep him happy, lol).

As for the hot/cold shoeing, I only know of 1 person that's willing to come to our area that does hot shoeing. He does good work, but seems burned out dealing with horses. I've seen him yell at horses for swishing their tail at flies. I don't care how much fly spray you have on a horse, there's always going to some around that seem immune to spray.
     
    03-22-2012, 10:57 AM
  #13
Foal
Yep that's true about horses. Every horse has their day!! Sorry I got off track on your thread. I was just trying to describe what was going on in my neck of the woods. I know everywhere you go is different. The truth is..they make tons of different kinds of shoes for corrective, fronts, backs, squared off toes, etc... I could go on forever talking about all the different shoes they factory make now compared to long ago. Sometimes its just easier to buy what they make rather than making our own. I gave up the forge about 4 yrs ago am I am just as busy as I was when I had it. As far as customers and money goes. I have tons I've lent a hand to when it comes to their horses feet. I completely understand that things happen. They were my regulars and show 100 percent interest in the horses well being so that makes me help them out. There's an old saying though too. I will give you my hand but I can't give you my arm. I love to work with peoples horses that's why I do what I do. I guess the economy or lack of has however turned my business into mainly trims and very little shoeing. The other farriers in my area have experienced the same thing.
So back to the original thread, there's a small difference between hot and cold shoeing, but my opinion...not much
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    03-22-2012, 01:46 PM
  #14
Weanling
My Shire mare used to need eggbar shoes... the farrier would show up, start up his forge and start with a straight rod of iron. It would take him three or four hours between starting the forge and my mare walking away in front eggbars.

Those shoes, which had several clips, never budged an inch until he came back to pull them.

The only part I didn't like was the smell. One time he had wrenched his back and I was the one holding her feet for him. When he burned that shoe on I got a face full of smoke that would gag a maggot.

My current gelding, who is a light horse, just needs front shoes without any complications. He gets cold shoes that take maybe twenty mintues total time.

Cost for hand made eggbars fronts only - $350
Cost for bought cold shoes, fronts only - $65
(both prices include trim all the way around)

And no, though I flinched everytime I wrote that check every ten weeks, she got her hot shoes.
     
    03-22-2012, 11:38 PM
  #15
Weanling
[quote=yadlim;1419500]My Shire mare used to need eggbar shoes... the farrier would show up, start up his forge and start with a straight rod of iron. It would take him three or four hours between starting the forge and my mare walking away in front eggbars. [quote]

Four hours seems excessive, even with handmades. In example; AFA CJF certification requires a full trim; handmade fronts and hinds, clipped all around, fitted, nailed up and finished to spec. Time limit is 2 hours.

Eggbars are tougher to make (welding heat). I'd guess about 2 hours, maybe 2 and quarter for the whole job.

Quote:
The only part I didn't like was the smell. One time he had wrenched his back and I was the one holding her feet for him. When he burned that shoe on I got a face full of smoke that would gag a maggot.
Smells like money! Sorry... bad farrier joke. It should smell like burning hair.

Quote:
My current gelding, who is a light horse, just needs front shoes without any complications. He gets cold shoes that take maybe twenty mintues total time.
AFA CF practical exam. Trim two feet, apply two keg shoes, no clips. Time limit is 60 minutes and a large percentage of candidates fail on the first try. Most common fail reason is going over time. It took me 57 minutes, hot shaped and hot fit (not required). If I had done it cold, I might have shaved 15 minutes off that time. Either way, to pass this test you WILL hussle!

If your farrier is doing a full trim and a pair of kegs nailed up in 1/3 the time it takes someone to pass the AFA CF exam, it begs the question... how many shortcuts is he/she taking.

Quote:
Cost for hand made eggbars fronts only - $350
Price varies around the country but this strikes me as well on the high side. I price a half set, handmade bars at $145.

Quote:
Cost for bought cold shoes, fronts only - $65
$85 for a half set of kegs; hot shaped and fit. Same money for cold work. Basic mods (clips, rolled, rockered, etc) included in price. I need an hour to an hour twenty to do it right. Travel distance outside my work area will add a trip fee.

Quote:
And no, though I flinched everytime I wrote that check every ten weeks, she got her hot shoes.
I like your attitude.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    03-23-2012, 12:25 AM
  #16
Trained
My farrier does hot shoes. My horse is shod on all 4s with clips and heel extensions on the shoes and what else I don't know haha but he is sound sound sound and my farrier has done wonders keeping him even on all 4 legs and correcting some things that previous farriers have messed up.
Takes him about 3 hours to do a reset as he modifies the shape of the shoes nearly every trim and 4 for a new set of shoes. A reset sets me back under $200. My horse is done every 5 weeks as well.
Sometimes he has trouble getting the shoes off haha they fit so well, I would not use a farrier who didn't hot shoe, the work is of a so much higher quality with better fitting shoes.
Posted via Mobile Device
Horseman56 likes this.
     
    03-23-2012, 03:11 PM
  #17
Weanling
The high cost of the front hot shoes had a lot to do with the horse they were going on - this girl was BIG at 18.3 hands and just over 1800 lbs, with a tendancy to LEAN.

I also may have underestimated how long it takes my current horse to get shod... But he is easy to trim and needs almost no shaping of stock shoes -farriers love that. They get all ready to reshape and check and recheck and then just put them on! He is also only getting fronts, so that saves a lot of time.

Oh, and my current farrier drives 150 miles one way to the stable... so we usually have ten or so horses for him so it makes it worth his while? I don't know, but my horse is sound when he is done and the last two farriers left him unsound so I am happy!
     
    03-23-2012, 04:15 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by yadlim    
The high cost of the front hot shoes had a lot to do with the horse they were going on - this girl was BIG at 18.3 hands and just over 1800 lbs, with a tendancy to LEAN.
That makes more sense. Draft size feet definitely come with higher maintenance cost.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    03-24-2012, 08:50 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by clip clop    
Yep that's true about horses. Every horse has their day!! Sorry I got off track on your thread. I was just trying to describe what was going on in my neck of the woods. I know everywhere you go is different. The truth is..they make tons of different kinds of shoes for corrective, fronts, backs, squared off toes, etc... I could go on forever talking about all the different shoes they factory make now compared to long ago. Sometimes its just easier to buy what they make rather than making our own. I gave up the forge about 4 yrs ago am I am just as busy as I was when I had it. As far as customers and money goes. I have tons I've lent a hand to when it comes to their horses feet. I completely understand that things happen. They were my regulars and show 100 percent interest in the horses well being so that makes me help them out. There's an old saying though too. I will give you my hand but I can't give you my arm. I love to work with peoples horses that's why I do what I do. I guess the economy or lack of has however turned my business into mainly trims and very little shoeing. The other farriers in my area have experienced the same thing.
So back to the original thread, there's a small difference between hot and cold shoeing, but my opinion...not much
Posted via Mobile Device
I agree clip clop. You sound like you've been around the block and went through the whole "Gotta have a forge to be a real farrier" stage. I have too. I made more shoes the first year I worked than I have in all other years combined. Because after a while I realized every horse doesn't require a set of handmade shoes.

As I said in my first post, forging is the way to go if you're making shoes. It's handy to be able to make what you need. Forging's awesome if you like to "blacksmith". My dad loved it. He's spend hours making shoes, even after working under horses all day. Even had a coal forge at home, as well as the gas forge in the truck. But I soon saw that people don't appreciate paying twice as much for handmade shoes, when they can get machined shoes that work just fine. I do believe it's important to know forging techniques, but you're right....you can buy most of what you need. Modify them with power tools if necessary.

So for me, forge work isn't necessary anymore. I'd rather work on more horses in a day than charge more per head. Especially in the hot summer. I git my fan pointed just right and shoe away! Give them a good job for a regular price and everybody's happy.
clip clop likes this.
     
    03-24-2012, 11:35 PM
  #20
Weanling
What's the difference?



Quality.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
See a difference? apachewhitesox Horse Riding Critique 10 04-02-2011 04:35 PM
What's the difference??? englishcowgirl1897 Horse Tack and Equipment 0 12-11-2010 01:23 PM
Do u see a difference??? charlene1985 Horse Health 8 08-28-2009 01:10 AM
Who Actually Knows the Difference? FGRanch Horse Health 10 06-28-2009 05:46 PM
what a difference! charliBum English Riding 3 01-08-2009 02:25 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0