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What's the hardest breed to shoe?

This is a discussion on What's the hardest breed to shoe? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
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    02-14-2012, 12:54 AM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmazinCaucasian    
can you explain this? Are you talking about a club foot?
His LF grows more toe than his RF. The LF tends to be underrun while the RF tends to be a smidge upright. It did not affect him until we began to do more "real" collected work, around third level. Now that he is doing PSG/I1 he needs to be trimmed every 4-5 weeks to keep him level.

Vet refuses to call it a "club" haha but essentially, yes, although a very mild one. He has always grazed with his right hoof back, and there is no familial history of clubs in his breeding, so I am assuming the grazing with the RF back was/is the cause.
     
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    02-15-2012, 12:07 PM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by equiniphile    

My farrier hates doing the drafts; they all lean.

I've got enough back problems without that. I trim my own and when he tried to lean I let go of his foot. After almost falling over a couple times he decided to stand up on his own. I could see that clients might not appreciate that teaching method though.

When I do call in a farrier to check my work he hates doing the donkey. Eyore is so short he has to almost crawl on the ground to get to his feet.
     
    02-15-2012, 01:51 PM
  #23
Showing
LMAO, AC! Are you talking about behaving during the process or how hard the hoof is? I did trimming myself for while. The worst breed I dealt with (or have seen the professional farriers deal with) was the "untrained for the farrier" breed. And worst time to trim is usually summer (those darn hoofs are hard as a rock and seem to chip in no time).
     
    02-15-2012, 10:34 PM
  #24
Yearling
Behavior mostly, but just anything that makes them difficult. Conformation, temperament, whatever

I'm kinda surprised there haven't been more responses. Every farrier I know has breeds they "love" to work on, and breeds they hate.

This isn't all of them but here's a list. I'll make this list from best to worst:

1. Tennessee Walking Horses....they're lean, high off the ground, (easy for a tall guy to be under), limber-legged and very predictable. They'll take alot before they come unglued. Good footed except many of them are toed-out in front
2. Foxtrotters....about the same, just a little stockier and slightly stiffer on average. Good straight legs and feet usually
3. Donkeys....Yes donkeys. I hated them for years. I even refused to do them for a long time. But I only do donkeys for 2 people now and they have several. I get along with THEIR donks good. These guys are hard disciplinarians and I don't have to do anything but trim. If they give me trouble, I just step out of the way and watch and learn. I probably won't take on any more, but the ones I do are a good bunch.
4. Quarter Horses (Paints, Buckskins, Palominos, and Apps are included).... because they're pretty much QHs nowadays....Sometimes jerky and stiff, but since I ride and handle them alot, I can usually predict them.
5. Ponies, Miniatures, and little donkeys....They'll kick you 5 or 6 times before you can get out of the way, but instead of having one big bruise, you have 6 little ones.
6. Drafts....My chiropractor loves for me to do them
7. Mules....Even though they're half-donkey and I do donkeys, I hate them especially when they're out of a crazy mare. The "gaited" mules are a little better.
8. Show-bred Paso Finos....Little schitzophrenic jerkbots. They're predictable....you can predict they're going to jerk right before you get a nail twisted off. They're responsible for more gashes in my shoein apron than all other breeds combined.
9. Ze-Donks....Trimming one is slightly better than a jab in the eye with a sharp stick
10. Zebras....I'd rather get kicked in the testicles while vomiting from Ebola than to do a zebra. They can bite you, paw you, and kick you at the same time. If they get you down they will camp on you and snake-stomp yer noggin till you quit moving.
8.
smrobs, Oxer, Fahntasia and 1 others like this.
     
    02-16-2012, 01:00 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmazinCaucasian    
Tennessee Walking Horses....they're lean, high off the ground, (easy for a tall guy to be under), limber-legged and very predictable. They'll take alot before they come unglued. Good footed except many of them are toed-out in front
I have only trimmed three TWH and they were all related (one mare and her two offspring, one of which I own). I have noticed how limber they are. I can put their feet/legs in just about any position or height and they are fine with it.

My draft x is so inflexible! At least he doesn't lean though.

My TWH is also a bit toed out, I never realized so many were. I have not been around many of them, just my guy and his mother and sister mainly. Has anyone noticed a tendency for some of them to be flat footed especially on the front? My guy and his full sister are very flat on front, but their dam is not. I have never seen the sires feet up close.
     
    02-24-2012, 03:32 AM
  #26
Foal
The Hardest horses for me to shoe are the ones that aren't used to being handled, regardless of breed. If a horse owner cleans the hooves daily and works their horse daily, shoeing is generally much easier--not just for me, but also for the horse!
     
    02-24-2012, 04:35 AM
  #27
Green Broke
The first time my farrier trimmed and shod Duffy, he had to cancel his next two days of appointments..

I have some pictures of her hooves at home, I'll post them after if I can dig them out.

Old nails left in, thrush infections, over grown. And pigeon toed ;D
You would have thought she'd never been handled.

Nut case was an understatement.

It was the only time she's ever lifted a hind leg to kick out. I solved that one.

And the leaning. She's a big girl, and big legs... and she used to lean on him- but as I am down every day, as Lucky said, I deal with her feet every day, and she's 100 times better now.

I did buy a TBx that sat down on my farrier the first time she was shod...
     
    02-24-2012, 08:49 AM
  #28
Foal
Draft horses and miniatures.

Drafts because they want to lean.

Minis because it's a pain in the arse to crawl under there. Seriously considered putting the thing on a table like dog groomers have. Very hard on the back.

TBs themselves aren't bad (manners or leaning wise or height wise) but good lord. Haven't they heard the expression no hoof no horse?

Met a morgan/welsh X once.. he was hard to get under, and tried to lean.. oy.

Best .. Arabians. Easy as sunday morning to take care of. Like most of the ponies.

ABSOLUTE WORST? The unhandled ones .. especially when they have owners who "know everything" (just ask them) .. and it seems that they always have owners who know everything (except how to handle their horse apparently). 2nd worst.. Owners who read everything on the internet and wonder why "XX won't work for this that or the other thing" when it works on "Insert famous horse/rider/farrier/etc".
DuffyDuck and hel like this.
     
    02-25-2012, 01:03 AM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokeslastspot    
I have only trimmed three TWH and they were all related (one mare and her two offspring, one of which I own). I have noticed how limber they are. I can put their feet/legs in just about any position or height and they are fine with it.

My draft x is so inflexible! At least he doesn't lean though.

My TWH is also a bit toed out, I never realized so many were. I have not been around many of them, just my guy and his mother and sister mainly. Has anyone noticed a tendency for some of them to be flat footed especially on the front? My guy and his full sister are very flat on front, but their dam is not. I have never seen the sires feet up close.
Flat footed? Sure, see it all the time, particularly the TBs, but the occasional walker too. For instance...


Properly fit shoes, light weight leather for protection, an antimicrobial packing and he's ready to ride. (Photo was before spit & shine)



Left him barefoot on the hinds...


Cheers,
Mark
hel likes this.
     
    02-25-2012, 01:31 AM
  #30
Yearling
Nice. You use a sander? Great finish, you obviously take pride in your work
     

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