wild burro chronic laminitis
 
 

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wild burro chronic laminitis

This is a discussion on wild burro chronic laminitis within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Chronic donkey founder hoof care

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    07-23-2014, 02:50 PM
  #1
Foal
wild burro chronic laminitis

I am a barn manager for a horse sanctuary in Ohio, USA and we have a 9 yr old Burro that we purchased through the Bureau of Land Management act about 8 yrs ago who has had chronic laminitis and abscesses and possibly foundered slightly a few times. She is on a dry lot with very little grass to munch on and primarily receives free choice grass hay and 1 cup Purina Hay stretcher daily with Remission suppliment in the morning. She is not stalled however is in the dry lot (primarily mulched) pasture at least 20 out of the 24 hours a day. She is extremely difficult to work with however and when she is in pain she will not let anyone look at her hooves! Our farriers are able to manhandle her and she receives a barefoot trim every 6 weeks or so.

Over the last few months she has had almost nonstop issues with her hooves. She has had an abscess on the right front and chipped the toe of her hoof off one evening. Almost a week later she was lame again and would not let us look at her hooves so the farriers came out and found she had an abscess in her left hind foot. He said he believed she may have foundered as well, even though she did not show the more classic signs.

Over the last month I have made it my mission to work with her every day and not let her out to the dry lot until she has let me pick all four hooves. I am the only one that she allows to do this...I am also the only one that knows very little about horses! I mostly feed and do chores then go about managing the volunteers and fundraising efforts so maybe she finds me less intimidating! Recently I have noticed that it looks like the sole is separated from the hoof wall and is actually overgrown to the point where that is what she is stepping on and I think that is causing some of her tender footedness. I am also concerned about possible seedy toe but the farriers did not think it was anything to be worried about, they said she will just take some time to recover from the abscesses and possible founder.

Any other tips to help her hooves would be much appreciated! I apologize for the crummy pictures however she is very difficult to work with and I could not get it completely picked out before her patience with me gave out. The picture is of her front right foot. The sole seems to be about 1/2-1inch longer than the hoof wall and separated from the wall about the same distance. Seems soft as well but has been getting more hard ever since I started picking her feet daily.
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    07-23-2014, 03:04 PM
  #2
Weanling
Gosh, this is a tough one; you have a lot of different things going on, here. I have some questions and might be blunt, buy I am not trying to be mean or malicious.

1. Discovering the root cause of her chronic laminitis is crucial
2. Getting trained to stand for foot care is just as cricial, although it is a lot hatder to pick your feet up when you are in pain.
3. You are a barn manager who does not know much about horses? What do your duties specifically entail and how to you arrive at your decisions without good knowledge of horses?
4. Are there any other equines on the property with similar issues or is she the only one?
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    07-23-2014, 03:07 PM
  #3
Weanling
Part two:

Once she gets trained to properly stand for foot care ( a matter of life and death, franklu,) she is going to need help in shedding a looooot of false sole and treatment for thrush.
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    07-23-2014, 03:16 PM
  #4
Green Broke
You're definitely right in thinking her feet are in poor shape. They are in VERY poor shape. The reason her sole is bulging out like that is because she has so much retained sole. It should shed off naturally, but she may not be able to. Or she doesn't want to. Is she is truly laminitic, her soles may be very thin. There could be coffin bone rotation, where it is dangerously close to penetrating sole. Therefore, she could have built up he own little "pad" with the dead sole and is retaining in for comfort and to protect her coffin bone. Or her diet paddock may be too dry and the sole is too packed in and hard to shed. Whatever the reason is, I would be very careful in taking a knife to them.

Her frogs are pretty much non-existent. She has got SEVERE thrush ava that alone could be causing her lameness. She may not be giving you an attitude when she's done holding her feet up. She goes as long as they can before having to put her foot down because they HURT. The most immediate thing you can do right now is treat her for thrush. There are many things you can use. I personally like to use Apple cider vinegar, but she will need something a lot more potent. Try using a mix of triple antibiotic cream and athlete's foot cream and make sure you get it into every single nook and cranny. Any little "tags" or flaps of the diseased frog you can easily pull off with your hands, do so. It decreases the places infection can grow.

Lastly, her feet are not trimmed well. Donkeys should have a more upright foot than horses, but they are not supposed to be walking on stilts. Her entire foot is too high, most likely due to the large amount of retained sole. Proper trimming after taking care of her soles and frogs should make her so much more comfortable.
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    07-23-2014, 03:29 PM
  #5
Trained
Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc.
Lots of info on diet, trim, an emergency diet, which she NEEDS, and a link to the Cushing/-Insulin Resistance group.
Definitely do the emergency diet, starting yesterday, and see on that group if anybody of the people there is near you to help you.
Get her off any green feed, get a slowfeeder net for her SOAKED hay. Trimming her right is crucial, but without the right diet it will not help.
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    07-23-2014, 05:18 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhaven    
Gosh, this is a tough one; you have a lot of different things going on, here. I have some questions and might be blunt, buy I am not trying to be mean or malicious.

1. Discovering the root cause of her chronic laminitis is crucial
2. Getting trained to stand for foot care is just as cricial, although it is a lot hatder to pick your feet up when you are in pain.
3. You are a barn manager who does not know much about horses? What do your duties specifically entail and how to you arrive at your decisions without good knowledge of horses?
4. Are there any other equines on the property with similar issues or is she the only one?
No worries about your bluntness; I take no offense!

1. We are a sanctuary with limited funds and although we had OSU veterinary hospital out for vaccinations in spring, she was not having this issue so they did not specifically look at her hoofs. Farriers are kind of non-committal and they just say "oh she just has bad feet" which is not a good answer in my book. I agree that discovering the root cause is of the absolute importance and thought I might try a forum before spending the budget on vet visit. Not that I have any problem doing such, but since we are a rescue I have to pick my battles and at the moment she just walks tenderly but is still able to run so its not the priority. Saying that sounds harsh but I have an EPM intake this week and also 2 seized horses that are a 2 on the body condition score.

2. Not that I wish to blame any of my predecessors but NO ONE has made the effort to train her. Anything that has been done to get her to this point has been me working with her for the last month. When I started the previous barn manager stated it was just the way it was. I've been here a year and I'm done with that logic, hence now a month later I am the only one here who can pick her feet and apply swat to her legs daily. Our Assistant Barn Manager (and horse trainer which I will explain in 3) is not even able to take her fly mask off, let alone lead her or pick her feet. So I recognize this importance am and trying, it just will take a lot of time. Our farriers do not seem to have much trouble with her but she tries to flee from them often even in the confines of a stall and they will have to use a heavy hand to get her to stay put.

3. I knew this would raise eyebrows so I tried to explain that I am more of a clerical "manager" of the barn than anything. I feed the horses, groom the horses, flyspray/mask, and help out on chores (scooping, haybags, water) but that is the extent of my involvement with them. I run more the inventory, appointments, adoption paperwork, volunteer paperwork etc. I am not the primary decision maker for the horses, the owner is. She is on the fence as we have wonderful farriers who just are blowing this off and she trusts them. I agree they do wonderful work but I think the issue is bigger than "oh she has crappy hooves". I want an answer therefor I am researching and exploring myself and am trying to fund raise for the $6,000 vet bills we currently have before adding more, although if we continue to blow off her hoof issue I feel like we will be adding the vet bills no matter if we fund raise or not!

4. She is the only one with these specific problems. We had our mustang (also purchased at the same time as her from the BLM) founder last year and she is also on the dry lot with our burro, a mini, and an obese draft cross. We have 86 acres all together, most of which are pasture for the other 11 horses. We have had a few with cracks in their hooves that the farrier recommended Remission as well so in all we have 5 horses taking that. If you are not familiar with it here is a link to a site that sells it. Horse Vitamins & Minerals for Healthy Horse Feeding: Remission at Drs. Foster & Smith

Thanks for taking the time to reply and helping me with this!
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    07-23-2014, 05:32 PM
  #7
Trained
Did he specify why Remission for cracked hooves?
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    07-23-2014, 05:37 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayella    
You're definitely right in thinking her feet are in poor shape. They are in VERY poor shape. The reason her sole is bulging out like that is because she has so much retained sole. It should shed off naturally, but she may not be able to. Or she doesn't want to. Is she is truly laminitic, her soles may be very thin. There could be coffin bone rotation, where it is dangerously close to penetrating sole. Therefore, she could have built up he own little "pad" with the dead sole and is retaining in for comfort and to protect her coffin bone. Or her diet paddock may be too dry and the sole is too packed in and hard to shed. Whatever the reason is, I would be very careful in taking a knife to them.

Her frogs are pretty much non-existent. She has got SEVERE thrush ava that alone could be causing her lameness. She may not be giving you an attitude when she's done holding her feet up. She goes as long as they can before having to put her foot down because they HURT. The most immediate thing you can do right now is treat her for thrush. There are many things you can use. I personally like to use Apple cider vinegar, but she will need something a lot more potent. Try using a mix of triple antibiotic cream and athlete's foot cream and make sure you get it into every single nook and cranny. Any little "tags" or flaps of the diseased frog you can easily pull off with your hands, do so. It decreases the places infection can grow.

Lastly, her feet are not trimmed well. Donkeys should have a more upright foot than horses, but they are not supposed to be walking on stilts. Her entire foot is too high, most likely due to the large amount of retained sole. Proper trimming after taking care of her soles and frogs should make her so much more comfortable.
Posted via Mobile Device
I guess I should mention that she is due to be trimmed next week however she was trimmed on june 24th as well. I will post pictures on tuesday after she gets trimmed to see what you think. If the farrier isn't doing it right I have no problem bringing someone else in. I will treat for thrush today, I think we have a bottle of white lightening in the medical closet!

We have already had our pastures analyzed and we have no alfalfa. I believe we had mostly orchard grass but I may be wrong there. We do not accept donation of any hay with Alfafa since we have so many horses that cannot tolerate it. It looks like we are basically doing the exact emergency diet already except for soaking the hay and the beet pulp. We only feed hay from slow feeders and nibble nets. I will definitely look into that group as well. Thanks!
     
    07-23-2014, 05:47 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Did he specify why Remission for cracked hooves?
he said that he has found that horses that are on it do not have problems with their hooves. He thought it to be the omega's. Just something he picked up with experience. I think in general it has helped those horses who tend to stay near the south pasture more where it is also a little wetter and swampy.
     
    07-23-2014, 06:00 PM
  #10
Started
Good on you for putting so much effort into this OP. I know there are many other places where this donkey would have been euthed by now.

You are being given lots of good advice, and I am not an expert, so I'm just chiming in to see if I can help you proceed. Simple rules, and simple steps.

1 Feed. Free choice hay is more than I would be giving a laminitic. I would be using one slow feeder hay net of soaked hay first in the morning, then in the evening. The only other feed I would want to give would be a supplement specifically for laminitic donkeys. Sorry, can't recomend one, but that is what I would be looking for.

2 Footing. Ideally - and I appreciate this may not be possible - I would get this donkey into a stall with thick thick shavings to cushion the feet as much as possible. Thicker than I would ever make a shavings bed - a big fluffy deep layer all over the stall.

3. Hooves. 1 treat the thrush as described below. 2 have x-rays taken and find a farrier who is prepared to work with a vet on remedial farriery.

The x rays and the shavings bedding are the only costly things here.

One final thing put the x-rays at the top of the list of things to do, and accept that the vet may recommend euthanasia. Not because it's the cheapest or easiest course of action, but because the degree of rotation may be too far to conceivably let this animal continue to suffer with it.

I hope you have successes and wish you - and the donk - well.
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Tags
burron, chronic laminitis, seedytoe?, sole seperation

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