wild burro chronic laminitis - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 41 Old 07-24-2014, 11:03 PM
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I agree with Patty. The coffin bone may already have rotated. I knew a paso with hooves like that. His owner was absent and the boarders were feeding him in a group in the field. He was stealing grain and very obese. I spoke to the boarders but since the horses got "skinny" during the winter they were feeding them extra during the summer.

I asked them to separate the horses during feeding but they couldn't be bothered. They got reduced board for caring for the owner's horses, but it didn't sound like the owner cared either.

I removed myself from the situation. There was nothing I could do and nothing animal services could do as the horses are fed.

That paso also had the separation you are seeing along with dropped soles.
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post #22 of 41 Old 07-25-2014, 01:29 AM
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Hi & welcome,

Haven't read all replies, just a quick few comments on what I did see...

Firstly, see link in signature below if you want any kind of hoof critique, as aside from saying they're bad & very seedy, we can't know much in the way of specifics here. What I can see... Appears heels may be a bit high at they are. There *may* be a lot of excess dead sole that needs to be removed(there often is with donks) BUT depends what's going on inside, there may also be precious little sole depth at the toe & she needs to grow more, can't afford to lose any more to a gung-ho farrier. So I think it's important that the trimmer knows what lies beneath. Are xrays possible? If so, *ensure feet are marked for them* Dorsal wall, hairline & point of frog.

She has very bad 'seedy toe' or 'white line disease' - unfortunately donks often get it terribly. I'd be seriously considering resecting this to treat it, as I bet it's deep & will continue getting worse if left.

I would NOT be feeding her free choice hay in a pink fit, but would put it in a slow feeder, &/or put a muzzle on her, also consider soaking the hay. I'd absolutely have her on remission or such.
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post #23 of 41 Old 07-25-2014, 02:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patty Stiller View Post
And this is the foot I am talking about having no false sole. The coffin bone MIGHT be right under the sole we see here.
Yes.....founder with Hoof bone rotation.

Have you had much dealings with these sanctions and rescue farms?
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post #24 of 41 Old 07-25-2014, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Yes.....founder with Hoof bone rotation.

Have you had much dealings with these sanctions and rescue farms?
Yes, a few. Mostly smaller local ones. It can be very frustrating because most are kept running by volunteers, many who have very little horse experience. They often volunteer just because they love horses but do not have the knowledge or skill to do the right things for a lot of horses. And many are running on little money, and can not afford the needed veterinary and farrier care for the worst problem hooves. Yet they keep getting more horses that they can not afford.

Some rescues though do very good work, and use terrific veterinarians and farriers on a regular basis. Some just get whoever will volunteer time and often it is beginning farrirs or trimmers who lack experience.

The biggest and best one in the United states is Best Friends rescue in Utah. Their equine rescue program is great.
I know their head farrier, Jen Reid. She is SO knowledgeable and dedicated, and works with a team of very good veterinarians.
They have rehabilitated some extremely bad hoof cases. And they will get help from even bigger hoof experts when they have to.
They had Dr Ric Redden from Kentucky help them on a very bad canker case.
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post #25 of 41 Old 07-25-2014, 05:13 PM
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Patty, what is the purpose of cinnamon.. I haven't heard that one yet
?Cinnamon is proven to help in the processing of carbohydrates in human type 2 diabetes. So that is why a lot of equine metabolic syndrome supplements contain it. It is such a similar syndrome that it should help and can not hurt.
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post #26 of 41 Old 07-27-2014, 10:04 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for your suggestions...I have been attempting to treat with the white lightening solution soak. I say attempting because in the last three days she has only allowed the bag to be put on her foot once which honestly I was surprised she even allowed that! She is still letting me pick her feet, my question is this now should I pick in the separation? Will that help get the fungus/bacteria or whatever out of there? She does not seem sore when I touch it but I havn't tried to get the gunk out of there for fear of causing her pain! Our owner looked at her feet as well and agreed there is definitely something not right with the sole and yes agrees seedy toe so thank you all for your confirmation.

Our owner is really great but she has 7 horses on her property that need more special attention and is not at the main barn where we have 15 horses and does not get to see these guys everyday so she did not realize that Jenny had gotten in such poor shape with her feet. This has been a great learning experience for me to stick to my gut feeling when I think something is not right! Farrier visit in 2 days so we will see what he says about resecting and I will call OSU vet tomorrow. I have been keeping her in during the day with a soaked hay bag and she seems to be doing okay with it as long as I keep the mini in with her!
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post #27 of 41 Old 07-27-2014, 10:55 AM
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Also it helps to have a farrier knowledgeable and skilled enough to resect all the infected areas and expose the whiteline fungus to air to assist n thorough treatment. Like this one. This is a donkey from the UK who had foundered years before and developed a stubborn case of whiteline disease. I took pictures a few years ago when I was there.

His farrier is very skilled and had been treating this for a while. The wet environment there was not helping nor was his rich grass field but the very aged owner of this very old donkey could make no changes.

Donkeys are incredibly tough. This one was sound on this barefoot because he still had big frogs and very thick sole to walk on.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg donk whiteline 2.jpg (53.8 KB, 52 views)
File Type: jpg donk whiteline.jpg (69.6 KB, 53 views)
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post #28 of 41 Old 07-27-2014, 08:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circlepkatrina View Post
Thanks everyone for your suggestions...I have been attempting to treat with the white lightening solution soak. I say attempting because in the last three days she has only allowed the bag to be put on her foot once which honestly I was surprised she even allowed that! She is still letting me pick her feet, my question is this now should I pick in the separation? Will that help get the fungus/bacteria or whatever out of there? She does not seem sore when I touch it but I havn't tried to get the gunk out of there for fear of causing her pain!
I personally doubt the effectiveness of just soaking anyway, if the infection is deep, but especially if you can't even do that, I would be thinking resecting is absolutely necessary, as you can't possibly clean it out to treat from underneath. But no, your picking is highly unlikely to go anywhere near sensitive tissue, so I wouldn't be worried about hurting her there. A good farrier/trimmer will know how far to go, to take as much as necessary without invading sensitive tissue. Then you'll be able to treat effectively with topicals.
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post #29 of 41 Old 07-30-2014, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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UPDATE!
Farrier came out and agreed with seedy toe. He resected as much as he dared without an xray and let me tell you the smell was horrific!! She behaved very well for the farrier to do this though and let me soak with white lightening solution today without much of a fight. He also debrided her sole, after resecting the toe he was able to see that she had a lot of overgrowth in her sole and it looks much better. I will try to get pictures later but I was just happy she let me soak it today! Vet is coming out at the end of august so we will have them look as well and decide on xrays at that time.
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post #30 of 41 Old 07-30-2014, 11:59 PM
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She'll definitely be tamer after all the attention haha.

Another months seems long to wait for xrays but I'll let the experts say on that.
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burron , chronic laminitis , seedytoe? , sole seperation

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