Your Laminitis/Founder Experience
 
 

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Your Laminitis/Founder Experience

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  • Platinum performance and laminitis
  • Previcox for founder horse

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    04-23-2013, 09:25 PM
  #1
Weanling
Your Laminitis/Founder Experience

Just wanting to here from anyone who has experienced this in their horses. I've never had it happen to a horse before now. Our horses are on free range pasture with a round bale of hay. All of the rest have no problem woth maintenence because they are ridded however one of our horses a Percheron pony and since I barrel race he doesn't get ridden as much. Long story short, he became over weight, over nutritioned, and founder. He is pre-laminitis right now. He is on stall rest 24 hours, 3 flakes of hay per day, bite twice daily, and thyroid medicine because on top of it all he has equine metabolic syndrome. That was the root of the problem the vet said. Just wanting to here your stories of how you got through it and what little tips may help me out. Thank you!
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    04-23-2013, 10:31 PM
  #2
Foal
I've been blessed to not yet have to experience either, but from what I've read and responses I've seen on this forum movement and correct trimming are a must. Hopefully more experienced members can give you more info. Best of luck with the pony!
     
    04-24-2013, 01:01 AM
  #3
Started
I've only dealt with one case of mild laminitis, and that was years ago.

Did you get x-rays to see if there was any rotation of P3? Because the degree of rotation will influence management choices.

I was fortunate to have a wonderful farrier and equine vet who worked well together. The vet created a treatment plan that the farrier and I followed to the letter. I know some people have issues with farriers not listening to the plan the vet comes up with.

ETA: Make sure your vet is experienced in dealing with laminitis. Many GPs are not.
     
    04-24-2013, 06:19 AM
  #4
Weanling
My gelding had what I assumed was a laminitic 'blow-out' on both back feet at the end of last winter (our first year together). No lameness or infection and the cracks are now fully grown out and his feet look great. I only say assumed because my bare foot trimmer wasn't convinced it was laminitis and she knows a whole lot more than I do. It started before the spring grass had come in, whether or not it was I will definitely be managing him much more effectively this winter and keeping a close eye on him. I try and keep his sugar intake down so he is on limited grass now and I soak all of his hay to get as much sugar out as possible.
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    04-24-2013, 08:38 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelracer11    
Just wanting to here from anyone who has experienced this in their horses. I've never had it happen to a horse before now. Our horses are on free range pasture with a round bale of hay. All of the rest have no problem woth maintenence because they are ridded however one of our horses a Percheron pony and since I barrel race he doesn't get ridden as much. Long story short, he became over weight, over nutritioned, and founder. He is pre-laminitis right now. He is on stall rest 24 hours, 3 flakes of hay per day, bite twice daily, and thyroid medicine because on top of it all he has equine metabolic syndrome. That was the root of the problem the vet said. Just wanting to here your stories of how you got through it and what little tips may help me out. Thank you!
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My senior TWH was diagnosed with EMS, or what they call "peripheral cushings" has never had so much as a mild lamnitis attack.

He went from an air fern to a hard keeper. He has been managed with only Chastetree since 2007 but this year I added Remission. He is now 25-1/2.

Another TWH was diagnosed with true insulin resistance, has had mild laminitic bouts since 2010 and fell off the founder fence in a huge way, March 2012.

5 degrees on the RF and 8 - 9 degrees on the LF huge. Those measurements are from the dorsal wall, not ground surface so the rotation was a huge deal.

There are two theories on treating founder:

1. Keep them in 24/7 in deep bedding.

2. Leave them out part of that 24 hour period.

Thankfully my vet wanted my horse outside part of the day.

I put boots and part pads on him and sent him into the half acre, side barnyard with a grazing muzzle during the day. I brought him into a stall with mats and only 3-4 inches of bedding because he was also dealing with torn ligaments from the rehab farrier cutting too much heel in one strike.

Hay was weighed on a scale and went in a slow feed hay net.

Nothing and I mean nothing I bought OTC helped get his insulin down. His insulin level consistently stayed at five times the level of my EMS horse, who was in the "high/normal" range.

During their physicals last December, my vet gave me two choices for the foundered horse:

1. Thyro-L
2. A prescription herbal blend called Hot Hoof 1.

I chose the herbal blend and it has worked miracles. To-date, my horse is maintaining a good weight (I can feel his ribs if I press lightly), I almost can't find his sheath, his eyes are no longer full of matter, he's actually stopped his allergy sneezing, and best of all his hooves are staying cool.

He also has more self-confidence and "zip" to himself, without being a nut case, than he's had in the 6+ years he's been here.

I have new trimmers and with some help from one of the pros on this forum, if he hasn't completely de-rotated, he's very close. My very good vet declared the LF, with 8-9 degrees rotation, would never completely de-rotate and it actually got there first

I certainly would use Thyro-L if the herbs would not have worked, or if they ever stop working but I am a person to take the hollistic route first, as long as it makes sense to do that.

I eventually opened up five acres for my horse to roam on, by himself, and still be able to see his three herd mates.

He stayed alone until the day came that HE told ME he was ready to join the herd. Due to dealing with torn tendons and a lot of coffin bone rotation, he was out during the day alone, for 11 months.

I can't physically trim anymore and have had to hire someone to do the real work but I have learned that it really paid for me to know how to trim.

It was critical to his recovery that I was able to do rasping in-between the Trimmer's 4-week visits, to keep the heels gradually lowered and to keep the front quarters from flaring.

At the very least, 4-week farrier visits are best and I firmly believe in keeping the horse barefoot during rehab. Shoes can go back on, once the horse is ready for work.

Having been thru this to a pretty bad degree, I can see every advantage to keeping the horse barefoot and none to keeping shoes on, during the rehab process. But whomever's rehabbing the hooves has to be well schooled on barefoot principles because there's a lot more involved than slapping a "wham-bam-thankyou-ma'am" pasture trim on the horse. JMHO
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    04-24-2013, 08:55 AM
  #6
Weanling
I'm going through the exact same thing right now. There's a thread not too far down. My horse was on a free feed 100% grass hay bale for the winter, he gets no grain and we still has snow on the ground when he foundered, so no fresh grass at all. Not quite sure what caused it, but the vet thinks a metabolic issue too. We are a bit over two weeks into treatment now. It looked quite mild at first, and when we put him on bute for four days he had improved a lot. However, five days in, after he'd been trimmed, all hell broke loose. He was very, very lame. Of course our vet was out of town for the weekend, it was really very stressful and he was in a lot of pain. We have now switched him from bute to previcox and he is managed with Softride gel boots. He is slowly improving, but it will take time.
He eats 4 flakes of grass hay per day which are soaked to remove the soluble carbs. I also let him move around twice a day in the arena. I turn him loose and he walks around as much as he feels comfortable with, which is not very much. But I think he enjoys seeing something else than the stall. I considered putting him outside in a paddock, but it's still very muddy here, and combined with him walking really badly, I'm a bit worried he might slip.
As far as I could find out, there are different trains of thought for hoof care. Shoes after the acute inflammatory phase are often open-toed or bar shoes to support the heels and frog and take weight off the toe. Apparently that brings quite quick relief, but has the disadvantage that it loads the walls and takes pressure off the sole.
Barefoot management bases on taking the toe back and providing lots of heel support. Some people use full or half pads for support, and some people use casting material to support the heel. I got a bit nervous at first, cause the more you research, the more different contradictory opinions you hear. But in the end it's a matter of chosing what you think is best for your horse...
Good luck!
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    04-24-2013, 11:09 AM
  #7
Banned
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwi79    
My gelding had what I assumed was a laminitic 'blow-out' on both back feet at the end of last winter (our first year together). No lameness or infection and the cracks are now fully grown out and his feet look great. I only say assumed because my bare foot trimmer wasn't convinced it was laminitis and she knows a whole lot more than I do. It started before the spring grass had come in, whether or not it was I will definitely be managing him much more effectively this winter and keeping a close eye on him. I try and keep his sugar intake down so he is on limited grass now and I soak all of his hay to get as much sugar out as possible.
Think what happened to your horse was abcess blew out at cornary band. Laminitis isn't a blow out. It effects front feet for most part but can affect back feet also.
     
    04-25-2013, 05:25 AM
  #8
Weanling
Spirit88 - thanks for that, I discounted abcesses due to the fact that all four coronary bands were affected to some degree but the hind two were the only ones that developed the deep cracks. Is it likely for abcess's to occur in all feet at the same time? I spent a lot of time searching on the net but couldn't find anything similar and it had my trimmer stumped.
     
    04-25-2013, 05:49 AM
  #9
Foal
My mare is mildly laminitic...she foundered before we got her but we believe it was from alfalfa. We've had her almost 13 years and I have done everything with her! Lower level eventing, gymkhanas, endurance...she is 26 now, and soundly 'retired' as my moms trail horse. She currently eats mostly bermuda grass, with a bit of 3 way and a mash of beet pulp/soy meal/ and platinum performance vits.
She does not have EMS, just chronic laminitis that we manage with her feed.
     
    04-25-2013, 08:15 AM
  #10
Trained
Generally laminitis doesn't cause 'blow outs' like that, but I think it can. If it's on all four feet, a sudden acute 'attack' combined with (or because of) mechanical stress in a particular area can cause this. Laminitis does affect all feet generally, although because of the different way the front feet are used, they tend to suffer more mechanical damage.

Thankfully haven't experienced anything more than mild 'sub clinical' signs in mine for a long time, but unfortunately see it a lot in my business.
     

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