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Your Laminitis/Founder Experience

This is a discussion on Your Laminitis/Founder Experience within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        04-25-2013, 08:25 AM
      #11
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwi79    
    Spirit88 - thanks for that, I discounted abcesses due to the fact that all four coronary bands were affected to some degree but the hind two were the only ones that developed the deep cracks. Is it likely for abcess's to occur in all feet at the same time? I spent a lot of time searching on the net but couldn't find anything similar and it had my trimmer stumped.
    This looks like a photosensitive reaction to me. Are all four hooves white?

    Nancy
         
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        04-26-2013, 06:49 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greentree    
    This looks like a photosensitive reaction to me. Are all four hooves white?

    Nancy
    Hi Nancy, yes all 4 hooves are mostly white. I havent heard of that before, will do some reading up on it - thanks : )
         
        04-27-2013, 08:36 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    This might be a really stupid question, but can someone tell me why rationed grass hay is so much better for a foundered horse than restricted grazing?
    Is it just the spring grass that's dangerous - so would later grass with lower protein and higher fiber (say the time point when the hay would be cut) be better?
    Or is it that nutrients are lost during drying and storage? I seem to recall someone saying that it's best to feed old hay (from the previous year), so the horse has something to do, but it basically has zero nutrients left.
    I would assume that if anything, hay fields are higher in nutrients and fertilizer that the pasture grass here in AB (which is not very rich to begin with).

    I perfectly understand that you wouldn't want the horse to just eat uncontrolled, but why is that better achieved on a dry lot with hay than by a limited time grazing with a muzzle?
         
        04-28-2013, 11:32 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    Old hay wont have no nutrients. Besides it not nutrients you want to limit but sugar/nonstructural carbs. A foundered horse still needs nutrients to be healthy. Old hay can still be problematic. It depends on the time of day it was cut, the type of grass, etc etc.

    Old hardened off grass is better than any spring fast growing grass. Also certain grasses are worse than others and many fields are mixed grass....The real issue is the sugars still rise in any living grass when the sun is out because its still growing. Hay will not change its sugar value any time of the day. That is why its better. Its consistent.
         
        04-28-2013, 12:35 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Regula    
    This might be a really stupid question, but can someone tell me why rationed grass hay is so much better for a foundered horse than restricted grazing?
    Is it just the spring grass that's dangerous - so would later grass with lower protein and higher fiber (say the time point when the hay would be cut) be better?
    Or is it that nutrients are lost during drying and storage? I seem to recall someone saying that it's best to feed old hay (from the previous year), so the horse has something to do, but it basically has zero nutrients left.
    I would assume that if anything, hay fields are higher in nutrients and fertilizer that the pasture grass here in AB (which is not very rich to begin with).

    I perfectly understand that you wouldn't want the horse to just eat uncontrolled, but why is that better achieved on a dry lot with hay than by a limited time grazing with a muzzle?
    as Trinity stated, it's all about the sugars. Grass stores sugars for when circumstances are best for growing. So horses up to their bellies im grass consume less sugars than when on short, eaten down or otherwise stressed grass( drought, frosty nights), the short grass hoards the sugars, the long has consumed all.
    Hay cut early in the morning and dried and baled quickly retains the sugars.
    Cool season grasses are " sweeter" than warm season grasses.

    A great source for learning all the little differences is Katy Watts | Safergrass.org
         

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