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Your thoughts on a chronic hoof problem?

This is a discussion on Your thoughts on a chronic hoof problem? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Barefoot hoof putty thrush
  • Barefoot hoof putty

 
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    12-04-2009, 01:41 PM
  #11
Trained
This is going to upset some people but I would get a AFA (American Farrier Association) certified farrier out to look at her and put shoes on her. The problem with horseeshoers and barefoot trimmers in this country is that all you need is a business card a a box full of tools to start a business. You may have a very good trimmer or you may not. By your own admission you don't know much about it. I doubt that the hoof grows out with a crack, it probably is weak and cracks from excessive pressure. Even if you want to go barefoot in the future consider getting a certified farrier out to look at that foot to see what can be done. The AFA has a pretty extensive testing process so the people that are certified have a pretty good grasp of hoof care.
     
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    12-04-2009, 01:53 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
This is going to upset some people but I would get a AFA (American Farrier Association) certified farrier out to look at her and put shoes on her. The problem with horseeshoers and barefoot trimmers in this country is that all you need is a business card a a box full of tools to start a business. You may have a very good trimmer or you may not. By your own admission you don't know much about it. I doubt that the hoof grows out with a crack, it probably is weak and cracks from excessive pressure. Even if you want to go barefoot in the future consider getting a certified farrier out to look at that foot to see what can be done. The AFA has a pretty extensive testing process so the people that are certified have a pretty good grasp of hoof care.

I appreciate your opinion and while I prefer to keep my horses barefoot, putting shoes on if it will fix the problem is certainly not out of the question. That the injury to Freyja's coronet band would cause her foot to always grow with a vertical crack was the opinion of my vet, rather than my trimmer, though if this is something that could also be healed obviously I would want to do whatever would make that happen. Thank you for your thoughts.
     
    12-04-2009, 01:55 PM
  #13
Started
^^ for the most part AFA farrier are great. I found a farrier from their list of contacts. I asked for bar shoes. He reshod my mare and ordered them to come out ASAP. Three weeks later he slapped the shoes on her w/o retrimming her feet!
     
    12-04-2009, 02:00 PM
  #14
Weanling
I almost bought a horse that has the same problem with the crack. He had an old injury that causes his foot to grow strange. He is not lame, doesn't wear shoes, is structurally sound. Kind of like when you damage your nail bed...sometimes it just never grows back the same I suppose?
     
    12-04-2009, 02:07 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacieandtheboys    
i almost bought a horse that has the same problem with the crack. He had an old injury that causes his foot to grow strange. He is not lame, doesn't wear shoes, is structurally sound. Kind of like when you damage your nail bed...sometimes it just never grows back the same I suppose?
Yes, from my understanding of what my vet said, that's exactly the situation. He said the hoof would never grow normally, but he also felt based on Xrays and lameness exams that she should be riding sound as well and eventually there would be no lameness. However, there clearly IS intermittant lameness....so perhaps I'm back to the getting a second vet opinion issue. :)
     
    12-04-2009, 02:09 PM
  #16
Started
I found a vet whom is also a farrier. I havent needed his services particularly, I use one of his associates for my mare. But if you can find a vet who is a farrier it would greatly help. You may not even have to take the horse anywere. You might be able to just send picture, video and xrays.
     
    12-04-2009, 10:07 PM
  #17
Weanling
Well I wanted to add my comments. I'm in no way an expert, I'm only a beginner on my path of barefoot hooves. And I'm commenting on something I watched tonight, not from personal experience. It's the experience of pete not I. I received my dvd's "under the horse" from pete ramey. Tonight I watched a video that talked about the frogs. My horse has some thrush too on a couple of hooves. I'm just treating em all. But what pete said was that treating the thrush with any type of topical or such is secondary. It plays a small role in what really gets rid of thrush. Heel first landings are what are really needed to get rid of thrush. Stimulation of the frog is a major factor to get rid of thrush. One needs to treat the thrush with topicals and such, but it's even more important to create a trim that will allow the horse to get stimulation to the frog. Sometimes that means leaving high bars and heels. If you took the heels so low that the frog got lots of stimulation then it would simply cause the horse to toe walk so it could avoid walking on the painful thrush. But they need to be trimmed just right to where the horse will have heel landings and get some stimulation to the frog from said such landings, but not so low to cause the horse to avoid the heel first landings. And hence that's how one creates a cache-22; how to get a horse to have heel first landings while it has a painful heel it wants to avoid.

Anyhow that's what I learned tonight about treating thrush from pete's personal experiences. I was alsot wanting to post this in the thread about treating thrush, but I figured it could be useful here too.
     
    12-04-2009, 10:23 PM
  #18
Foal
The hoof putty would probley be the best
     
    12-05-2009, 08:51 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by totalfreedom    
Well I wanted to add my comments. I'm in no way an expert, I'm only a beginner on my path of barefoot hooves. And I'm commenting on something I watched tonight, not from personal experience. It's the experience of pete not I. I received my dvd's "under the horse" from pete ramey. Tonight I watched a video that talked about the frogs. My horse has some thrush too on a couple of hooves. I'm just treating em all. But what pete said was that treating the thrush with any type of topical or such is secondary. It plays a small role in what really gets rid of thrush. Heel first landings are what are really needed to get rid of thrush. Stimulation of the frog is a major factor to get rid of thrush. One needs to treat the thrush with topicals and such, but it's even more important to create a trim that will allow the horse to get stimulation to the frog. Sometimes that means leaving high bars and heels. If you took the heels so low that the frog got lots of stimulation then it would simply cause the horse to toe walk so it could avoid walking on the painful thrush. But they need to be trimmed just right to where the horse will have heel landings and get some stimulation to the frog from said such landings, but not so low to cause the horse to avoid the heel first landings. And hence that's how one creates a cache-22; how to get a horse to have heel first landings while it has a painful heel it wants to avoid.

Anyhow that's what I learned tonight about treating thrush from pete's personal experiences. I was alsot wanting to post this in the thread about treating thrush, but I figured it could be useful here too.
That's pretty much in line with my thoughts, I have watched my "Under the Horse" DVD series several times, and just reviewed again where he is talking about thrush. Freyja, at this point, does land heel first on that foot about 50% of the time, and flat footed the other 50% of the time. I think it's the catch 22 you are talking about - I am not sure what is going to improve until her feet are less painful from the severe thrush infection, yet Pete's stance on the DVD is the thrush wont improve until it's "outgrown". I just don't see how to get there right now. I feed very good quality hay that's been tested, and my horses are on pasture all day every day. This mare is the only one getting feed, and she's gettting a pregnancy/lactating mare mix of sweet feed which IS high protien, but she only gets about 2 cups, mixed with about a cup of beet pulp, and two tablespoons of weightbuilder, twice a day. Remember she was skin and bones when she came to me - she's in decent shape now but not "there yet", especially as she's getting big with her pregnancy too. Ideally I'd cut the carbs completely out of her diet, but with her still needing weight gained and growing a foal, I don't see how that is possible. I feel like if she could just get a break from the thrush long enough to heal her heels and grow a decent frog, we'd be in a position to go somewhere, but it feels like progress has been at a standstill because of the rot in her feet for weeks.
     
    12-05-2009, 02:39 PM
  #20
Started
Sugars feed thrush......... I would stop the sweet feed and substitute it with more natural feeds. Grains are not all that good for horses. They gain better on good solid foods like hay, grass, beet pulp, and such. At least cut the sugar out and give her something other than sweet feed. That's my 2c
     

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