Should you OWN a horse? - Page 11
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Resources > Horse Articles

Should you OWN a horse?

This is a discussion on Should you OWN a horse? within the Horse Articles forums, part of the Horse Resources category

    Like Tree13Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-25-2010, 10:13 AM
      #101
    Banned
    Wow Barry. Great post! I 100% agree. Horses are a huge commitment and sometimes people have more money than brains. We have an OTTB who broke her withers and her hip bone in the starting gate. Her scars, mental and physical, are hard to look at. She must have really been something on the track because they saved her life to keep her as a broodmare. It probably cost them in excess of 15K to put her back together. Dani lives on bute and still limps. While she is a special horse and truely one of my favorite girls, if it had been my call, Dani wouldnt be here. As fate turns out, she was bred 3 times, the last to a Percheron...the foal was too big and ripped her wide open. She almost bled to death but again, was saved. Now she is a broken horse with no real 'job' or quality of life. While that alone shouldn't be a life sentence, if you find someone who can take care of her for life other than a rescue like ours, you must know some dedicated people.
    It has been a long 20 years of picking up knowledge along the way. I am still far from a polished rider or owner but I hope my experience makes up for my lack of funds!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-25-2010, 12:52 PM
      #102
    Started
    Corin
    It was a bit heavy with emotion last night when Tara was being put to rest on a hillside in a beautiful green valley. Along with the owner's family there were over a dozen people standing in the field watching the horse being put to rest. All the horses that normally graze in the field had been shooed across into the adjoining paddock so that the tractor driver could dig what was to be a very big pit.

    Tara the mare had a companion, another Shire but a gelding called Archie. Earlier in their lives the pair had worked together in a trail riding centre and until the accident they had never been separated. My friends had bought them as a pair to be the family's hacks.

    Just as the finishing touches were put to the groundwork, Archie came back into the top of the burial field on his own. He stood there for several minutes and looked down on us. Then he slowly walked back into the adjoining field where he had been grazing. Eerie. He must have sensed something was going on - or maybe he knew.

    Up until that I had been surprised how he had been taking the loss of his long term companion. He had been brought into the stable yard every day that he had been ridden and he had to pass by Tara's stable to reach the tacking up area. But he never made any move to go over to her door. It was almost as though he knew Tara was a goner. Undoubtedly the gangrenous wounds were giving off some odour.

    But at that moment when he stood still in the field and stared, he touched my soul.
         
        05-25-2010, 02:08 PM
      #103
    Banned
    I know that heartbreaking feeling when horses just know. To them, I would imagine that gangrene smells like death, something that most horses want to avoid. I think we are all with you in your time of loss. It is never easy losing a horse, whether she was yours or not. When I think of all the horses that I've lost, I try not to get sad. I try to think of them all in one big paddock with grass past their knees. In my mind, they are all waiting at the fence the way that the good ones do. Ears pricked and whickering. Staring me down for treats or pats or scratches. It might be a while before I get there, but I doubt they mind the wait.
         
        06-05-2010, 02:30 AM
      #104
    Foal
    Cool BestJumping

    I'll just try to own a horse not by cash in hand but by the monthly installation because it's all about fun and adventure,thanks.
         
        06-08-2010, 05:01 PM
      #105
    Foal
    AMEN! I love this post-so true! I full-leased a horse for 2 years before I bought my first horse. It got me decently prepared to own. Owning a horse is wonderful but it comes with SO much responsibility. Reading this forum site every night helps me learn alot too! (:
         
        06-08-2010, 05:37 PM
      #106
    Started
    A Contract between Me and My Horse
    At the time I bought my present horse I accepted that I had entered into a binding contract, not so much with the seller but with the horse, a mare called DiDi. In passing over a cheque, I had paid the previous owner of the horse for the privilege and responsibility of taking DiDi into my care.

    As part of the purchasing process I had arranged for the horse to be checked by a vet to ensure that she was healthy and without health issues. Once I had got her home, other specialists checked her teeth, her back and her feed. It was important for me to know that I started my relationship with the horse having a clean bill of health. From the day of purchase the financial risks of injury or ill health were covered by insurance. I had also during the purchasing process ascertained, as far as I could, that the horse was fit for my purposes.
    Was she up to my weight.?
    Was she temperamentally sound?
    Would we get on together?
    Would we enjoy each other’s company?

    I already rented the horse’s new facility, which is located close by to my home. She inherited my previous horse’s stable and his pasture. The stable is dry and clean. The pasture is well fenced and has its own supply of water Because the field slopes down towards the south east there is shelter from the elements to all but the South Easterly winds Anyway at night or during very inclement weather, she will be coming in to the stable. The sward is adequate and free from obnoxious weeds. The grass grows throughout the spring and summer months for her to graze on but for much of the year as a matter of routine she will be given two meals a day and have access to all of the hay she was likely to need. The livery yard is located in open countryside and close by are country lanes and woodlands over which to ride.

    Nowadays it is important for horse to be recognised by and registered with, the State. My horse is chipped, freeze marked and passported. In this way she is readily identifiable and can be traced back to me. Even her saddle carries a little tag giving my name and telephone number.

    My previous horse’s saddle was unsuitable, so a new saddle was chosen to fit her exactly and bought from a competent saddler. Her old bridle was replaced by a new one and experiments were made to establish the best bit for her. After experimentation she acquired a mild Myler bit together with a flash nose band. She also acquired a full set of protective boots. In the tack room cupboard there are now numerous potions and lotions to help keep her in good nick.

    After all as the human owner it is my responsibility to look after her health and well being to the best of my ability and for so long as she is in my care.

    It will be my intention to school her on to develop her capabilities but it will not be my intention for her to need to push herself in competition for my own self aggrandisement. She will not be asked to jump too high, nor to gallop too fast.

    When the time comes that I am incapable of exercising her then no doubt it will be time to pass her on.
    She could easily live longer than me. She came into this world as a horse, she will in due course leave it as a horse. As a human I can only protect her to the limit of my ability, to a certain extent she must find her own role in this life.

    There is also the chance that one day she may find herself in severe distress and it may become incumbent upon me to make the final decision in life for her. At such a time I will make any decision based on the best solution for her - regardless of my own emotions.

    In return I ask of her that:
    She does not bite, nor kick, nor strike.
    She does not rear, nor buck, nor bolt, nor baulk
    And that she willingly carries me where I believe it to be appropriate for us to
    go.
    I cannot make her into a happy contented horse but I can provide her with the care that hopefully she is comfortable with.
    B G
         
        06-09-2010, 03:38 AM
      #107
    Green Broke
    I can see where people are coming from. We probably all know someone or have seen random horses that are not properly taken care of. It is very sad that people want horses and they get them and then realize 'guess I can't afford food this month for the horses'. Times right now are rough for a lot of people due to lack of jobs and there are lots of horses suffering right now.
    I am not a rich horse owner. I always put my animals first. I get my horses hooves done 6-8 weeks,shots,good quality hay,everything a horse can imagine.My vet is kind and lets me pay bills which is very nice since a lot of vets here don't. Yea, I'm a new horse owner and I don't know everything. I ask people lots of questions and sometimes people are rude but that doesnt stop me from learning and owning my horse which I take darn good care of. I can't afford $200 supplement but my horse is in good health. She had a bad back, I called the vet. My horse coliced,I called the vet. Although people don't have a fancy barn with all the nicest tack or are stabled at a high class barn doesn't mean that they can't provide for their friend.

    I honestly don't know what I am getting at either.

    I guess just because you aren't wealthy doesn't mean you can't own a horse and provide for it. I'm no where near wealthy but my horse and husband's horse are in great condition.
         
        06-09-2010, 03:45 AM
      #108
    Green Broke
    Oh and although this thread is something we can all learn from I see a few people that seem offended which I can see that in some ways this can offend people...just don't want this to get out of hand,ya know.
         
        06-09-2010, 03:55 AM
      #109
    Weanling
    ... I have a horse she gets everything she needs... end of story... but we don't see her every single day she lives like 30 mins away there is no place closer... so I guess I don't aply here the trainer is really responsible for calling the vet for us in our case because we are there only twice a week
         
        06-09-2010, 03:57 PM
      #110
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dedebird    
    ... I have a horse she gets everything she needs... end of story... but we don't see her every single day she lives like 30 mins away there is no place closer... so I guess I don't aply here the trainer is really responsible for calling the vet for us in our case because we are there only twice a week

    As long as you know she is taken care of that is all that matters =) If her health is not declining you know that your trainer is doing a great job.

    I see my horse everyday but I'm not rich like I said. I can't afford to pay over $100 for board and most places want a lot of money. I paid $75 altogether at one place but that was with me doing self care which was the only option.I pamper my horse and I know she loves me.She is happy and healthy and we share a bond. That's what matters to me. If I couldn't afford her I would do the right thing and sell her but I had not had any trouble at all. She is in a pasture now.

    I sometimes think that some people think they are better than others on this board because they can afford expensive board,expensive feed,supplements,etc. You get what my point is. At some point I find it getting kind of ridiculous(sp?).
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:59 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0