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Should you OWN a horse?

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        04-16-2010, 07:12 PM
      #51
    Yearling
    Citrus, I'm on my way to an event and don't have time to fully respond to your post. You obviously completely missed the point of this post. I can assure you that I can think of at least a dozen threads just in the last few months where owners were asking for advice on a horse that was in extreme medical need, and was truly a life or death situation, but still refused to call a vet. Are you really going to tell us that people can learn proper horse care from a book??? Wow, that is just the kind of ignorant attitude I'm referring to.
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        04-16-2010, 11:51 PM
      #52
    Green Broke
    A book is better then nothing at all.
         
        04-17-2010, 12:18 AM
      #53
    Weanling
    Agree!
    I've been working on horse farms 5 days a week for 10 years and theres STILL so much I don't know! Itd be crazy to have NO horse knowledge at all
         
        04-17-2010, 01:08 AM
      #54
    Weanling
    After reading the original post all I can say is I find horses so much easier as pets in comparison to dogs. Well, not my dog. Even though he's all Border Collie he is the equivalent of a pet rock as he fits my life perfect. But compared to most dogs. I'd take taking care of 30+ horses any day.
         
        04-17-2010, 06:54 AM
      #55
    Green Broke
    I agree with this!
    People think if they buy a cheap horse then they will be cheap to care for but a 100 horse and a 10,000 horse need just as much care as each other.
    I have been riding since I was 7 and around horses all my life. I was 17 when my parents bought me my own horse and my riding instructors reaction was 'about time too'
         
        04-17-2010, 09:01 AM
      #56
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pidge    
    The only area I differ in is their teeth... I don't think they HAVE to be done yearly or twice yearly.My gelding needs his done 1-2 times a year...and I pay for it no problem...but my mare hasnt had hers done in forever and she is fine...
    I agree with this. Many, many horses that spend a very normal 18+ hours a day grazing grass or munching hay rarely need any dental work.

    On the general topic, considering maintenance requirements is one of the most overlooked areas I've seen in the decision of which horse to buy. There are indeed a lot of beautiful, great riding, very low maintenance, easy keepers out there. If you look at their diet and their feet before you buy, those two items can save you a ton of $$s in food, vet, and farrier maintenance costs. Always have funds for the emergencies, but having a horse does not need to empty your wallet.
         
        04-17-2010, 11:06 AM
      #57
    Green Broke
    Im moving into a house ATM where people had horses (and very well shouldnt of). The stalls in the barn and all chewed down to barely nothing, they stalls look like they havent been cleaned in god knows how long. The pasture fence is falling down, half of the lean-to is on the ground. They have an old bathtub as a water trough. The water line to the barn bust so half the stalls are soaked. They have an old shed where your supposed to keep chickens, they kept a mini stallion in there. Which btw is falling down aswell. Its a perfect example of people who should not have horses nore deserve to have horses. The state those horses were living in was just terrible.
         
        04-17-2010, 11:43 AM
      #58
    Foal
    Had I read this thread prior to getting our horse I might have thought things through a little more carefully. Expenses for the horse were definitely taken into consideration before hand but the enormous responsibility of horse ownership didn't kick into my brain until after. The whole thing seemed so logical at the time. I'm not one to post much on forums but have found so much information here on HF that has changed my way of thinking. I was drawn to this forum because of the honesty of the pro's so just wanted to say thanks for the time it takes to educate us newbies.
    ~Cathy
         
        04-17-2010, 12:52 PM
      #59
    Guest
    My little terrier sits at my feet as I write this. My Rottie is on his bed - dozing for a couple of hours until the time comes when he knows I am going up the the stable. He will be at the car before I get to it. The two dogs are very little trouble really. When I go to bed, then so do they. When I get up, so do they. They have their routine and what ever I do is the focal point of that routine. In return they are my constant, loyal, faithful companions. Life would be lacking without their company.

    As to the horse, well DiDi is different. The routines are now well established but she doesn't live with me in my house, she lives up at the stables. Yeh, she has a clock in her head but she is in her stable on her own from about 7.00pm until 8.00 am the following day. For much of the day, except when we are playing about, she is out in her paddock. She is dependent upon me to check her, groom her and put her away and in the morning to make the decisions in life for her as to how she is going to spend her day. Her day equals three days of mine and so her days are precious to her.
    If something is wrong, then she has to tell me and I have to understand what she is telling me. There is a lot of non verbal communication between the two of us. She trusts me to look after her, I trust her to carry me.

    Owning a horse is undoubtedly an expensive business. There are stable fees, feed bills, insurance, shoeing, teeth, the vet and tack. But the biggest cost
    To me is in my time. She demands my time. She is virtually 100% dependent upon me for her well being.

    Owing a horse is a lifestyle - it is not a hobby or a sport, it is a way of life.
    You are either prepared to make the sacrifices to own a horse or you are not.
    In this life, in this era, you can make your choices and you can take your chances. But I'll chose a dog and a horse any day. No regrets.

    Undoubtedly some folks do not add up the full cost of owning a horse in time, money and anguish. It comes as a shock when they find out just how high the cost is. The rewards are high too.

    Barry G
         
        04-17-2010, 12:53 PM
      #60
    Guest
    My little terrier sits at my feet as I write this. My Rottie is on his bed - dozing for a couple of hours until the time comes when he knows I am going up the the stable. He will be at the car before I get to it. The two dogs are very little trouble really. When I go to bed, then so do they. When I get up, so do they. They have their routine and what ever I do is the focal point of that routine. In return they are my constant, loyal, faithful companions. Life would be lacking without their company.

    As to the horse, well DiDi is different. The routines are now well established but she doesn't live with me in my house, she lives up at the stables. Yeh, she has a clock in her head but she is in her stable on her own from about 7.00pm until 8.00 am the following day. For much of the day, except when we are playing about, she is out in her paddock. She is dependent upon me to check her, groom her and put her away and in the morning to make the decisions in life for her as to how she is going to spend her day. Her day equals three days of mine and so her days are precious to her.
    If something is wrong, then she has to tell me and I have to understand what she is telling me. There is a lot of non verbal communication between the two of us. She trusts me to look after her, I trust her to carry me.

    Owning a horse is undoubtedly an expensive business. There are stable fees, feed bills, insurance, shoeing, teeth, the vet and tack. But the biggest cost
    To me is in my time. She demands my time. She is virtually 100% dependent upon me for her well being.

    Owing a horse is a lifestyle - it is not a hobby or a sport, it is a way of life.
    You are either prepared to make the sacrifices to own a horse or you are not.
    In this life, in this era, you can make your choices and you can take your chances. But I'll chose a dog and a horse any day. No regrets.

    Undoubtedly some folks do not add up the full cost of owning a horse in time, money and anguish. It comes as a shock when they find out just how high the cost is. The rewards are high too.

    Barry G
         

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