Some help needed please?
 
 

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Some help needed please?

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        01-11-2012, 09:35 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Some help needed please?

    Okay so I took Art alongside normal lessons at school and really enjoyed it, and if I do say so myself, I was pretty good! That was almost three years ago now.

    I mostly used pencils and charcoal, but did like using paints and pastels from time to time.

    I've recently started drawing again and need some help and advice! I'm still pretty good at head shots but when it comes to full bodies.. hmmm..!! I can't always get the proportions right and im not entirely sure about muscle placement etc. What do you do to help yourself when drawing? What do you think is the most important part of the drawing? Most of the time, my horses either look calm and happy or evil and angry! How do you express emotion and personality? I used to be able to do it all but I've lost it!

    Anything else you want to add to help please do!!

    Thanks guys
         
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        01-11-2012, 09:51 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    Porportion can be helped by using some sort of measuring tool, and working on ratios, so to speak.
    I measure the distance from one eye to the other, for example, on the screen as I look at the head photo. I use a pencil, held up against the screen to do this. Then, holding my finger to mark that distance, I hold it up against something else, like the long nose to see how does the distance between the eyes relate to the length of the nose. Is it twice? 2.5 times? Knowing this relationship means that I can do the same thing on paperp; make the length of the nose 2.5 times the distance between the eyes. This can be used for anything. Just draw on thing, like the head itself, then figure how it relates to the neck, body, arm bone, etc.

    When I draw a horse in action, I draw the spine first. The spine is the anchor and the expression of the movement. Spine and neck. Then I think about how the horse is carrying it's weight and make sure that I have the legs in the correct order they would be in if it were actaully galloping/cantering.

    I actually imagine, in my head, that I AM that horse, and how I would feel and move. It's very visceral to me. I don't 'let myself worry about details until I have the spine down and the general flow of the animal. So hard to explain . . .
    Kayty likes this.
         
        01-11-2012, 09:58 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    porportion can be helped by using some sort of measuring tool, and working on ratios, so to speak.
    I measure the distance from one eye to the other, for example, on the screen as I look at the head photo. I use a pencil, held up against the screen to do this. Then, holding my finger to mark that distance, I hold it up against something else, like the long nose to see how does the distance between the eyes relate to the length of the nose. Is it twice? 2.5 times? Knowing this relationship means that I can do the same thing on paperp; make the length of the nose 2.5 times the distance between the eyes. This can be used for anything. Just draw on thing, like the head itself, then figure how it relates to the neck, body, arm bone, etc.

    When I draw a horse in action, I draw the spine first. The spine is the anchor and the expression of the movement. Spine and neck. Then I think about how the horse is carrying it's weight and make sure that I have the legs in the correct order they would be in if it were actaully galloping/cantering.

    I actually imagine, in my head, that I AM that horse, and how I would feel and move. It's very visceral to me. I don't 'let myself worry about details until I have the spine down and the general flow of the animal. So hard to explain . . .
    Thank you!

    Also, my headshots are pretty good, I am pretty good with detail and shading, but they just don't look as realistic and life like, like some of the ones I have seen in this section already. How can I help myself here? Is it just practice?
         
        01-11-2012, 10:56 PM
      #4
    Started
    I am by no means an artist! But if your horses arnt looking realistic one major thing is the eye! If the eye doesnt look right then the whole drawing will look off ( this is the problem with my drawings) studying horse eyes really helps and drawing a few will help your drawings dramaticly.

    I would love to see some of your drawings :)
         
        01-11-2012, 11:15 PM
      #5
    Trained
    The eyes are what will really make your drawings realistic. The shape, depth and colour will give away your subjects emotional state more than anything else. Until you can master the eye, a drawing will never look realistic or be able to express the emotion of the animal.
    Creampuff likes this.
         
        01-12-2012, 07:49 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Caitlinpalomino    
    I am by no means an artist! But if your horses arnt looking realistic one major thing is the eye! If the eye doesnt look right then the whole drawing will look off ( this is the problem with my drawings) studying horse eyes really helps and drawing a few will help your drawings dramaticly.

    I would love to see some of your drawings :)
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    The eyes are what will really make your drawings realistic. The shape, depth and colour will give away your subjects emotional state more than anything else. Until you can master the eye, a drawing will never look realistic or be able to express the emotion of the animal.
    Well I know my drawings aren't awful but I don't feel comfortable uploading them... maybe when I get back to how I used to be?!

    So, the eye. Best advice for drawing them? And Kayty, how exactly do you show emotion through the eye? Could you show me any examples to look at?

    I think what I am going to do is maybe concentrate on eyes for a while! I do like working in pencil, but I would prefer charcoal, do you think this is a good idea? I also used to be good with paints, is it possible to get the same quality with these? I find it much easier to shade and define muscles etc with paints rather than pencils.
         
        01-12-2012, 08:48 PM
      #7
    Trained
    I'm at work at the moment so can't go hunting for any examples right now, but basically practicing as many eyes as you can will really help. Just go onto google, and type on 'angry horse' or 'scared horse', 'happy horse' etc. And you'll get some hits of horses with different expressions. The eyes are the 'window to the soul', any animal is the same, you can determine their emotion by looking at their eyes.
    Study the eyes closely, instead of looking at them just as another bit to draw, another shape and clump of shading, try to get to know your subject, but observing their eyes.

    It is vital to use a broad range of tonal values when drawing the eyes, there will always be a '10' value (black) and always at least a 3, but usually 1 (white). I try to put in my 10, and my 1 first, and work the rest in after. Without those tones, the eye will be flat, dull and expressionless.

    The same principal applies to drawing a three-dimensional sphere. The shadow is a 10, and you gradually work up to a 1, to create the 3 dimensional effect.
    An eye is the same, you need to have a source of light shining off the eyeball, which creates the 10 value shadow, and the 1 value shine. This will make the eye 'pop' and appear spherical. The pupil is usually around an 8 or 9 value, I don't tend to make them a 10 unless in shadow.

    The skin and fur around the eye is also important, the 'eyebrow' angle and depth enhances the quality of the emotion in the eye. So make sure you get your proportions right there. Generally there is also a rim of 1 or 2 value 'shine' around sections of the eyelid - make sure you draw this in, it is VERY important!

    I hope that has helped you a little, if you feel brave enough, go away and practice just eyes, and put them up here so you can get some help on how to improve them :)
         
        01-12-2012, 08:53 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    I'm at work at the moment so can't go hunting for any examples right now, but basically practicing as many eyes as you can will really help. Just go onto google, and type on 'angry horse' or 'scared horse', 'happy horse' etc. And you'll get some hits of horses with different expressions. The eyes are the 'window to the soul', any animal is the same, you can determine their emotion by looking at their eyes.
    Study the eyes closely, instead of looking at them just as another bit to draw, another shape and clump of shading, try to get to know your subject, but observing their eyes.

    It is vital to use a broad range of tonal values when drawing the eyes, there will always be a '10' value (black) and always at least a 3, but usually 1 (white). I try to put in my 10, and my 1 first, and work the rest in after. Without those tones, the eye will be flat, dull and expressionless.

    The same principal applies to drawing a three-dimensional sphere. The shadow is a 10, and you gradually work up to a 1, to create the 3 dimensional effect.
    An eye is the same, you need to have a source of light shining off the eyeball, which creates the 10 value shadow, and the 1 value shine. This will make the eye 'pop' and appear spherical. The pupil is usually around an 8 or 9 value, I don't tend to make them a 10 unless in shadow.

    The skin and fur around the eye is also important, the 'eyebrow' angle and depth enhances the quality of the emotion in the eye. So make sure you get your proportions right there. Generally there is also a rim of 1 or 2 value 'shine' around sections of the eyelid - make sure you draw this in, it is VERY important!

    I hope that has helped you a little, if you feel brave enough, go away and practice just eyes, and put them up here so you can get some help on how to improve them :)
    Thank you very much Katyt, I really appreciate the help and advice! I really want to get back into drawing and painting.

    Thank you for the "shading scale" of 1-10, I will most definitely try and use this in my work. In fact, I am going to try and draw an eye right now. You've motivated me tonight! I wasn't planning on doing anything tonight but I will now.
    Kayty likes this.
         
        01-12-2012, 08:56 PM
      #9
    Trained
    Good on you :)
    The more you practice, the better you get!
    Working in graphite initially will be easiest to get an idea of those tonal values, it lets you be a little tighter with where you put the shading. Pastels are a bit tricky as you still have the values, but in varying colours and they don't tend to stay where you want them to ;)
         
        01-12-2012, 09:36 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    Okay so I just quickly drew this for you to take a look at. Please feel free to critique/give advice/tell me what's wrong. But remember I did just draw this in the space of time between this comment and my last one Sorry about the crap lighting, doesn't really do the picture much justice.

         

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