Aggresive gelding
 
 

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Aggresive gelding

This is a discussion on Aggresive gelding within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Gelding food aggresive
  • How do i get a gelding to stop breaking fences all the time to get to the mares on the other side

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    09-28-2012, 02:34 PM
  #1
Foal
Aggresive gelding

I've been boarding my horse at a facility for the last 6 months, and in those two months the facility owner has turned my horse (gelding) out with her gelding two times. The first time, her gelding bit my horse on his stomach, leaving a long scar. I requested they be separated and everything was fine. She proceeded to turn them out together again this morning, with two mares, and her gelding ran up on my horse and bit him AGAIN on his back. So now he has two large wounds from this horse. I am thinking about moving barns because she now wants to isolate my horse from the mares in a small pasture to prevent this from happening again. I believe she should move HER horse, as I am the one paying for board and it's her horse that's the problem. I just don't want to overreact and move when this has been the only complication thus far. Would you tolerate that kind of response or move?
     
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    09-28-2012, 02:37 PM
  #2
Showing
The aggressive horse should be the one separated, not the nonaggressor.
     
    09-28-2012, 02:49 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Well our barn moves horses around depending on how they get along with others. Agressive horses stay separated. I would move especially since this is the BO that is doing this, what will they do next?
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    09-28-2012, 02:51 PM
  #4
Trained
^^^^
That's always been the case at most of the barns I've been at.
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    09-28-2012, 03:02 PM
  #5
mls
Trained
You've been there two months or six months?

There are going to be pasture bruises until the horses learn to get along. Horses are herd animals and there is a structure within the herd. The constant switching of herds does more harm than good. Unless a horse is out and out nasty, they tend to settle down within a week.

I truly wish people could watch the interaction in a herd sometimes. Especially those that think their horse is the poor picked on one. Many times they nag at another horse until that horse has enough and says "knock it off". Since they speak with their hooves and teeth, there can be marks left.

I did just have to kick out a horse due to him constantly chasing a vision challenged gelding through the fences. Owner claimed I never told her he was agressive. I pointed out an incident a boarder came to me with last winter where she herself told the other boarder her horse was being picked on. Other boarder said actually it's the other way around - and to prove the boarder right - the agressive gelding went after another horse smack dab in front of her. The only response was 'oh'.
     
    09-28-2012, 03:10 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Mls - I wish many owners would figure that out. I work at my barn so I'm involved with alot of this stuff and you have to expect some cuts, bites, scrapes. But sometimes there are those horses who just cannot be with a more agressive herd.

My horse gets along with every horse but not every horse will get along with her. We have to be careful where she goes. If horses chase her off food she will not stand up for her self and get food and she loses weight very quickly in that situation.

By the way, I hope your boarder isn't headed our way we have new ones coming in.
     
    09-28-2012, 03:13 PM
  #7
Green Broke
There's a lot of info we don't know so we can only speculate. How many horses are there? Just the 4 or are there more? How many pastures are there? Just the 2, a small isolated one and a bigger one or are there more? Who's normally out with the mares? Your or hers or neither?

You say that she should move hers. Would hers then be isolated? Horses are herd animals, so it's not really "fair" to isolate either hers or yours.

It's also not right to throw two unaquanted horses together. They should be allowed to get introduced over a fence but that isn't always feasible. Even then there will still be squabbles and injuries.

You said your horse has a long scar from the first time but later you say he has two wounds. Horses heal pretty well. I've seen quite a few injuries that never scarred up.

I don't think I would consider her horse as aggressive. If her horse kept chasing your horse around the pasture and yours had several injuries, then yes I would. Her horse is only putting your horse in place in the herd. It has only been 2 times they have been together. It's normal for them to get injured when being introduced. If you keep pulling them out right away, it will never get better.
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    09-28-2012, 03:16 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
You've been there two months or six months?

There are going to be pasture bruises until the horses learn to get along. Horses are herd animals and there is a structure within the herd. The constant switching of herds does more harm than good. Unless a horse is out and out nasty, they tend to settle down within a week.

I truly wish people could watch the interaction in a herd sometimes. Especially those that think their horse is the poor picked on one. Many times they nag at another horse until that horse has enough and says "knock it off". Since they speak with their hooves and teeth, there can be marks left.

I did just have to kick out a horse due to him constantly chasing a vision challenged gelding through the fences. Owner claimed I never told her he was agressive. I pointed out an incident a boarder came to me with last winter where she herself told the other boarder her horse was being picked on. Other boarder said actually it's the other way around - and to prove the boarder right - the agressive gelding went after another horse smack dab in front of her. The only response was 'oh'.
Sorry...don't know why I put 2 months...it's been 6 months. I have watched herd situations and I understand the ways in which horses react when bothered. I also understand that it takes time to develop a pecking order, but this is out of hand. We're not talking a nick...it's a deep open wound.The situation involved my horse nuzzling one of the mares on the opposite side of the fence, when the aggressive gelding came running full speed at him and sliced his back open. Not ok.
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    09-28-2012, 03:17 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
There's a lot of info we don't know so we can only speculate. How many horses are there? Just the 4 or are there more? How many pastures are there? Just the 2, a small isolated one and a bigger one or are there more? Who's normally out with the mares? Your or hers or neither?

You say that she should move hers. Would hers then be isolated? Horses are herd animals, so it's not really "fair" to isolate either hers or yours.

It's also not right to throw two unaquanted horses together. They should be allowed to get introduced over a fence but that isn't always feasible. Even then there will still be squabbles and injuries.

You said your horse has a long scar from the first time but later you say he has two wounds. Horses heal pretty well. I've seen quite a few injuries that never scarred up.

I don't think I would consider her horse as aggressive. If her horse kept chasing your horse around the pasture and yours had several injuries, then yes I would. Her horse is only putting your horse in place in the herd. It has only been 2 times they have been together. It's normal for them to get injured when being introduced. If you keep pulling them out right away, it will never get better.
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    09-28-2012, 03:22 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
There's a lot of info we don't know so we can only speculate. How many horses are there? Just the 4 or are there more? How many pastures are there? Just the 2, a small isolated one and a bigger one or are there more? Who's normally out with the mares? Your or hers or neither?

You say that she should move hers. Would hers then be isolated? Horses are herd animals, so it's not really "fair" to isolate either hers or yours.

It's also not right to throw two unaquanted horses together. They should be allowed to get introduced over a fence but that isn't always feasible. Even then there will still be squabbles and injuries.

You said your horse has a long scar from the first time but later you say he has two wounds. Horses heal pretty well. I've seen quite a few injuries that never scarred up.

I don't think I would consider her horse as aggressive. If her horse kept chasing your horse around the pasture and yours had several injuries, then yes I would. Her horse is only putting your horse in place in the herd. It has only been 2 times they have been together. It's normal for them to get injured when being introduced. If you keep pulling them out right away, it will never get better.
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There are 2 pastures, a large one and a small one. There are 4 horses total, 2 mares and 2 geldings. In the 6 months we've been there the two geldings have been in adjacent pastures so it's not like they'be been completely isolated from each other. There are now two wounds total, an old one from the first bite that did leave a long scar and this new one on his back.
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