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Aggresive gelding

This is a discussion on Aggresive gelding within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • "gelding biscuit"
  • How to teach two dominant geldings to get along

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    09-28-2012, 03:26 PM
  #11
Green Broke
Can you get pictures of the wounds? Some geldings are dangerous, there's one at our barn now that cannot move from his paddock with his one mare. He took a huge chunk out of another geldings back years ago and cost the owner thousands in vet bills.
     
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    09-28-2012, 03:54 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by AshleyCL    
Sorry...don't know why I put 2 months...it's been 6 months. I have watched herd situations and I understand the ways in which horses react when bothered. I also understand that it takes time to develop a pecking order, but this is out of hand. We're not talking a nick...it's a deep open wound.The situation involved my horse nuzzling one of the mares on the opposite side of the fence, when the aggressive gelding came running full speed at him and sliced his back open. Not ok.
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Sorry, but still doesn't sound like an aggressive horse. Her horse and yours were fine together until yours went to check out the mares. That sounds more like a protective horse, whether he's protecting the mares like they're his like a stallion or he felt your horse was a threat to the mares. I would guess more along the lines of the first. An aggressive horse would not leave the other horse alone. He would be constantly after the other horse. JMO
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    09-28-2012, 03:56 PM
  #13
Green Broke
I think she ment the two geldings have been in separate pastures but they are next to eachother. So they could sniff noses over the fence but he could never get to her horse until the BO moved them together.
     
    09-28-2012, 04:04 PM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
Sorry, but still doesn't sound like an aggressive horse. Her horse and yours were fine together until yours went to check out the mares. That sounds more like a protective horse, whether he's protecting the mares like they're his like a stallion or he felt your horse was a threat to the mares. I would guess more along the lines of the first. An aggressive horse would not leave the other horse alone. He would be constantly after the other horse. JMO
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Is that not aggression? Every time he sniffs a mare he gets bit and that's ok? I think that's aggression.
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    09-28-2012, 04:13 PM
  #15
Yearling
If there's two pastures, why can't two be in one and two be in the other. Mare and gelding or mare and mare.

You never know, if you put the two geldings together away from the mares they might get along fine.

Mare/gelding mixes I don't like. Sometimes it just doesn't work.
I have 2 studs and 3 geldings all together and they are great.
If a mare was in the mix, all Hell would break loose
     
    09-28-2012, 04:24 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by AshleyCL    
Is that not aggression? Every time he sniffs a mare he gets bit and that's ok? I think that's aggression.
It may be aggressive "behavior" but that doesn't mean the horse is aggressive. A protective horse can and will act as aggressive as it needs to, to protect. Once the threat is gone, a protective horse stops the aggressive behavior. An aggressive horse will be aggressive without reason and will stay aggressive. Watch a mare with foal. She will be nice as can be when there is no threat to her and the foal. If there becomes a threat, she will act as agressive as needed to remove the threat and go back to normal once it is gone.

Talk to the owner to work out a compromise. If you two can't work something out, move your horse. Plain and simple.
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    09-28-2012, 11:07 PM
  #17
Banned
We never turn boarders horses out together, for this very reason, we want to make sure they don't get hurt....they can visit over the railing but that's about it. The only time we put two horses together is if they belong to the same owner and the owner has said yes.

As far as I'm concerned, it's your horse, your money and your aggravation....if the BO is ignorant enough to put one of her boarders horses at risk (again...) then I'd want to pay my money to someone a little more skilled in equine management.....she can do what she wants with her horses...but it's your money/time/vet bills..........Id say see ya.......

Ps. The herd mentality is not always feasible when it's your horse getting his hide opened up every day......
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    09-29-2012, 08:21 PM
  #18
QOS
Green Broke
Horses can certainly be persnickity. My gelding, Biscuit, doesn't have a mean bone in his body, but his body is FULL of "pickin'" bones. Our other gelding, Sarge, is the dominate horse but he is very patient and tolerant . Biscuit runs over to him, rears up, bites him on the hocks, the neck the back...blah blah blah. Sarge gives him the shove off look - Biscuit choses not to see that signal until Sarge lets him have it. Sarge rarely has a mark on him and Biscuit is always sporting a cut, a bite mark, hair gone. If I didn't know better, I would think Sarge was just being aggressive with him.

I did board my first gelding Red at a place that turned him out with the barn managers NASTY mare. OMG she was a nasty piece of work and kicked him him the ribs hard enough he flinched when touched there for 6 months.

If you feel the other horse is aggressive ask they not ever be turned out together. It could be just the pecking order getting settled or you could end up with major vet bills.
     
    09-29-2012, 08:37 PM
  #19
Green Broke
I have to agree wholeheartedly with Muppetgirl in this - you are paying good money to have your horse boarded, and it was way out of context in my opinion that the BO once again put her horse with yours without consulting you first. Yes, definitely there's a pecking order to be had with horses, but as a paying boarder you and your horse deserve far better respect than this. I would calmly but firmly have a talk with her a.s.a.p, but also wouldn't hesitate to begin seeking out other barns in the meantime.
     
    09-29-2012, 09:06 PM
  #20
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
There are going to be pasture bruises until the horses learn to get along. Horses are herd animals and there is a structure within the herd. The constant switching of herds does more harm than good. Unless a horse is out and out nasty, they tend to settle down within a week.

I truly wish people could watch the interaction in a herd sometimes. Especially those that think their horse is the poor picked on one.
I couldn't agree more! I tell people whose horses are new to our barn that their horse is likely to have marks on him the first week, as the horses have to figure out their pecking order. Most people who actually have had horses in their own care KNOW this... the people who've only ever boarded their horses seem to be that only ones who seem somewhat clueless to this (this is definitely not true across the board...).

We are very diligent about keeping herds that get along together, but the first few days usually involve some squealing and turning of the heels. One horse is ALWAYS going to come out on top, and the bigger the herd, the less likely the "alpha" horse is going to be yours :/ The kind of aggression that makes us put a horse by itself is when they back into another horse and don't stop trying to kick, or trying to bite/strike out without stopping.

If the horses are getting to know each other, chances are pretty good that some nipping will occur, and sometimes, one horse nips harder than the other :/ resulting in an ugly mark that will likely heal over (and isn't truly a scar, just a wound that is still healing) without issue.
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