Aggresive gelding - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Horse Boarding

Aggresive gelding

This is a discussion on Aggresive gelding within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

    Like Tree24Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-30-2012, 05:59 PM
      #21
    Foal
    I would hesitate to make a real call on this one without actually seeing them interact. My boy is the bottom of the pecking order, and I admit when I first got him I was frantic over every nip and cut. I have since decided he is a big boy and can handle himself. BUT... there are agressive horses.. I asked my last BO NOT to put my boy in with one particular horse ( she complied ) because he DOES go randomly after other horses and double barrel kick them without provication. (found my boy cowering in a corner far from the food a few times, and witnessed some double barrel kicks... ) New barn.. yes, there is an alpha horse who CAN make his place on the pecking order very clear. My boy has some nips. But mostly they share the pasture quite easily. I guess the question I would have is: is your boy being kept away from food or water? (never acceptable) Do the horses for the most part exist peacefully, stand together, etc? If your boy is fed, and appears OK with the status quo, I would give it some time. Cuts on horses can look a LOT worse than they are...
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        10-03-2012, 10:12 AM
      #22
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    Ps. The herd mentality is not always feasible when it's your horse getting his hide opened up every day......
    Sorry - TWO marks in six months is not outrageous. We own siblings and they pick on each other more than that.

    Heck horses alone can mark themselves up more than that!
         
        10-03-2012, 10:21 AM
      #23
    Trained
    MLS-the way I am reading it they have only been together twice, each time leading to a mark. Did I miss something?

    Why would the BO out of the blue put them back together again? That just boggles my mind. Regardless, you are paying board, you asked for them to be seperated because of the first incident, she agreed, and that has been done, with great results, until now. I am confused as to why she would screw that up?
    fkcb1988 likes this.
         
        10-03-2012, 10:26 AM
      #24
    Green Broke
    So I just gotta say that the other day I was doing chores and a potential new boarder was looking at the place. She told the owner she didn't like her horse to have any nicks on him so she wanted him with only one other gentle horse Her horse is a draft cross YEARLING, not sure what she expects.....

    Luckily that is a no go, dodged a bullet there.

    But yes the way I understand this is the horses have been over the fence from eachother but if the two are together it results in a mark more than just working out the herd dynamics. Agressive horses exist. Some horses are instigators.
         
        10-03-2012, 11:19 AM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    Speaking as someone who lost a horse when it had its leg broken after being kicked by a really aggressive pony I am now very cautious about what goes on in the field
    Yes there will always be a pecking order and horses will always have a nip and a bite at each other - its when it becomes more than that you have to consider if a horse should be in with others.
    If your horse gets injured enough to need a vet who will pay for that? Not the BO I imagine. If you can't ride your horse because it gets lamed then will she provide you with another horse until its sound again? Probably not.
    I introduced our new mare to the two others she will share with last week - it took just a couple of days of some half hearted runs at her and a couple of harmless scuffles and now we have peace. If I had thought there was ever any chance of serious injury we would have had to come up with a plan B - I cannot risk losing a horse for the sake of 'its normal for them to kick about a bit attitude'
    What people do with their own herds is up to them - their own risk but I don't think that BO's have the right to take risks with other peoples horse
    Northernstar and fkcb1988 like this.
         
        10-03-2012, 12:02 PM
      #26
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    What people do with their own herds is up to them - their own risk but I don't think that BO's have the right to take risks with other peoples horse
    How about those of us BO's that are told the horse is the 'sweetest thing', gets along with everyone - and then chases horses through a four board oak fence and breaks the neck of a long yearling?

    Things happen. Horses can change attitudes when out in a different situation. I've been in the business for over 20 years. I have yet to meet a 100% honest horse person. Most folks are pretty barn blind when it comes to their own horse.
         
        10-03-2012, 12:09 PM
      #27
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    How about those of us BO's that are told the horse is the 'sweetest thing', gets along with everyone - and then chases horses through a four board oak fence and breaks the neck of a long yearling?

    Things happen. Horses can change attitudes when out in a different situation. I've been in the business for over 20 years. I have yet to meet a 100% honest horse person. Most folks are pretty barn blind when it comes to their own horse.
    That is a totally different situation - you can't be a mind reader and yes horses can change when they get moved and some accidents are unavoidable but if a BO is aware of a REAL problem then they should deal with it for the sake of the other owners
    I managed a large yard for a long time and also ran my own yard after that. I always felt that I had a responsibilty to the people who boarded there
    Northernstar likes this.
         
        10-04-2012, 05:27 AM
      #28
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    How about those of us BO's that are told the horse is the 'sweetest thing', gets along with everyone - and then chases horses through a four board oak fence and breaks the neck of a long yearling?

    Things happen. Horses can change attitudes when out in a different situation. I've been in the business for over 20 years. I have yet to meet a 100% honest horse person. Most folks are pretty barn blind when it comes to their own horse.
    Yeah, all true, but this BO was asked, agreed and has been keeping the horses separate. Why would she again take the chance? I just don't get that.

    Was there a new horse coming in or something that perhaps she needed to try it again OP?
    jaydee likes this.
         
        10-04-2012, 09:34 AM
      #29
    Banned
    My perspective is this: when you are paying good money to board a horse, it shouldnt be subject to getting beaten up in the pasture everyday. If you own more than one horse and want to pen them together then that's all good and well, however when you are taking care of someone elses horse you take the upmost care to avoid injury on that animal, which means not placing it in situations that could cause injury.
    Heres a good example:
    When you board a dog, do you expect the management to put your dog in with the pitbull whos staying on the premises? Nope. And if your dog gets mauled.....who is to blame? The same applies to horse boarding.....JMO
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Northernstar and jaydee like this.
         
        10-04-2012, 09:49 AM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    When you board a dog, do you expect the management to put your dog in with the pitbull whos staying on the premises? Nope. And if your dog gets mauled.....who is to blame? The same applies to horse boarding.....JMO
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Seriously? Why breed bash? Was it necessary to use "pitbull" as the dog that "mauled" another dog? The media does a good enough job sensationalizing "pit bull attacks," does everyone need to do it?

    As for the OP, the important thing is that the boarder specifically ASKED that her horse be separated, and it was put with the other horse again without being discussed first. I would leave.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    gelding with attitude issue after gelding Bandy Horse Training 9 05-06-2012 04:45 AM
    Aggresive Dogs and Horses JackofDiamonds Horse Riding 78 11-14-2010 02:06 AM
    aggresive when getting in trouble,,,long...sorry jazzyrider Horse Training 20 08-22-2008 02:11 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:49 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0