Aggresive gelding - Page 4
   

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Horse Boarding

Aggresive gelding

This is a discussion on Aggresive gelding within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • My intuition gelding
  • Horse attacked me with barred teeth

Like Tree24Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-04-2012, 04:19 PM
  #31
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikelodeon79    
Seriously? Why breed bash? Was it necessary to use "pitbull" as the dog that "mauled" another dog? The media does a good enough job sensationalizing "pit bull attacks," does everyone need to do it?

As for the OP, the important thing is that the boarder specifically ASKED that her horse be separated, and it was put with the other horse again without being discussed first. I would leave.
yes, SERIOUSLY, I could have said Labrador, but Im not sure the general public would have got my point. I was making a point, not breed bashing, I have known plenty of pit bulls and their owners. Considering that the pit bull has been labelled by the media (and rightly so in some instances) I consider the fact that I used a pit bull as an example as something many not so dog savvy people could relate to.....sheesh.....relax
Just for the record here, pit bull attacks are sensationalized because when a pit bull attacks it does serious damage......compared to the little chihuahua who nipped a toddler.....the attacks by pitbulls can be horrific, that is why the media reports it.......ie. 70 year old woman mauled, receives 189 stitches....I think that's newsworthy.....I'm stating a fact, not bashing a breed....because there are many other breeds out there that can do as much damage when they attack.....
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-05-2012, 11:45 AM
  #32
Yearling
I can see both sides. On one side, she shouldn't have put them together, It wasn't her place to do so. On the other hand, I think you might be overreacting a tad. (Sorry if that sounds snide!) The first time they were put together, the dominant gelding felt the need to establish his dominance most likely. He wants to stay top dog. So, there's going to be some scuffs and cuts just from the pecking order establishing.

Then they were separated again. For weeks (Months?) When they were put together the second time, that last time they duked it out isn't valid anymore. They have to reestablish the pecking order all over again. I guess I can't really say without seeing the pictures of the wounds but unless they are together for a week or two, repeated separation and reintroduction is going to cause problems. It doesn't surprise me that he got a mark both times they were introduced. It doesn't seem like an aggressive gelding, just the standard 'aggressive; behavior that will come of him wanting to remain top dog.

BUT. Like I said. If you wanted them separated, and she put them together TWICE, that's not okay. If she's going to keep doing that, and you don't like it, you should certainly move. I don't really think it's fair to just isolate one of the horses away from the rest at all - it needs to be two and two or all together, and let them figure out the pecking order all by themselves. Marks will happen, but if you don't want the fighting you should definitely move the horse to where he'll be most comfortable and safe (And have buddies).
     
    10-05-2012, 12:23 PM
  #33
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebox    

They have to reestablish the pecking order all over again. I guess I can't really say without seeing the pictures of the wounds but unless they are together for a week or two, repeated separation and reintroduction is going to cause problems. It doesn't surprise me that he got a mark both times they were introduced. It doesn't seem like an aggressive gelding, just the standard 'aggressive; behavior that will come of him wanting to remain top dog.
To me it sounds as though the pecking order was never really established the first time.

My husband's old mare (25) is alpha mare. Rules her herd just a shake of her head or stomp of her hoof. We all know if she does more than that, the offender must of been REALLY naughty. The other night she turned and went after one of my husbands other mares when they were on their way in for supper. She didn't make contact as the other mare did move. I laughed. It takes a lot for her to expend that kind of unnecessary energy. The other mare actually smirked. These horses have been together for almost 10 years.

If a horse goes out of it's way to attack another horse - yes keep them apart. But normal herd dynamics - it's equine family drama.
     
    10-06-2012, 05:22 PM
  #34
Foal
Well, I made the decision to move him. I had a serious "ah-ha" moment the other day, when my horse got another wound on the opposite back end on Friday. I was leading my horse through the pasture when the other gelding came at us full force. I'm not talking scratches or simple, skin deep cuts here. This one is cut all the way down to the muscle. I had the vet out, she said it was too late to be stitched and that made my decision very easy. I took pictures of both, but my phone is not cooperating whatsoever. I have to say I disagree with a horse having aggressive behavior without an aggressive nature. I have seen this other gelding come full force at my horse, teeth bared, and cut him to the muscle. Not happening ever again. I should've listened to my intuition in the beginning, but at the sake of being "too picky" I let it slide.
Northernstar, jaydee and fkcb1988 like this.
     
    10-06-2012, 05:39 PM
  #35
Trained
Well, I have a clyde cross who (it was witnessed or I would NEVER believe it) actually tried to kill a mare. I mean cornered her and was pummeling her. Had to take a tractor into the pasture to get him to stop. One incident, and I have had him nearly 20 yrs. I will never know what happened to get him started. Otherwise this is the biggest puppy dog of a horse. Barn favorite,go in the stall and lay with, my daughters 4H horse, and now a therapy horse for PTSD vets and Hospice kids. He definitely does NOT have an aggressive nature.

I also had another who was definitely a VERY aggressive horse. After I owned him about 6 months he started to chase anyone who entered the pasture. He would come at them teeth barred, try to bite and kick, and no kind of whip made any difference. He quickly found a new home!

There is a HUGE difference. One aggressive episode does NOT make an aggressive horse.
     
    10-06-2012, 05:49 PM
  #36
Green Broke
Very glad for your decision, and hope things will go smoother @ the new barn - Our instincts are usually pretty good when it comes to those things, and when I read your description at the beginning of the thread, it did sound more than a few simple scratches due to pecking order. You saw the wounds. I definitely understand pecking order, as my new morgan was 3rd down the ladder in her original herd, and when she came, she had some nasty looking marks on her rump (hair now filled in). However, when one is paying hard-earned money and their horse is very clearly injured in this manner, it becomes intolerable right now. The very best of luck and better times ahead for you! :)
AshleyCL likes this.
     
    10-08-2012, 09:24 AM
  #37
Super Moderator
Wise decision to move. I have seen some serious injuries to people when a horse also doesn't have any respect when the animal its attacking is actually being led by its owner. I was flattened myself in a similar incident though thankfully unhurt other than some bruising. The horse that attacked was very quickly removed from the 'herd'
I can't totally agree with the aggressive thing though. Our Clyde cross can be a bully in the field - though she has never actually harmed another horse I wouldn't trust her not too so she lives with one companion that she has respect for. I would also describe her as bossy to handle but she doesn't have a mean bone in her body where people are concerend and I've never known her to kick, bite or retaliate badly when she does have to have the occasional 'good talking too' to remind her who's in charge
     
    10-08-2012, 10:48 AM
  #38
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
Wise decision to move. I have seen some serious injuries to people when a horse also doesn't have any respect when the animal its attacking is actually being led by its owner. I was flattened myself in a similar incident though thankfully unhurt other than some bruising. The horse that attacked was very quickly removed from the 'herd'
I can't totally agree with the aggressive thing though. Our Clyde cross can be a bully in the field - though she has never actually harmed another horse I wouldn't trust her not too so she lives with one companion that she has respect for. I would also describe her as bossy to handle but she doesn't have a mean bone in her body where people are concerend and I've never known her to kick, bite or retaliate badly when she does have to have the occasional 'good talking too' to remind her who's in charge
I think what I'm trying to say is that I wouldn't tolerate that kind of behavior in my horse so I can't understand why someone else would. He may not be a flat out nasty horse, but he absolutely became aggressive in the environment that the BO repeatedly facilitated. To make things even worse, the BO let it slip that my horse had a minor colic about 3 weeks ago and she "fixed" it on her own without even calling me. I am livid.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    10-08-2012, 10:57 AM
  #39
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by AshleyCL    
I think what I'm trying to say is that I wouldn't tolerate that kind of behavior in my horse so I can't understand why someone else would. He may not be a flat out nasty horse, but he absolutely became aggressive in the environment that the BO repeatedly facilitated. To make things even worse, the BO let it slip that my horse had a minor colic about 3 weeks ago and she "fixed" it on her own without even calling me. I am livid.
Posted via Mobile Device
It sounds like you are well out of there to me.
I know exactly what you are saying and I would feel the same.
I've often found that the people who are always saying that 'You should put up with all this kicking and biting as its normal herd behaviour are the ones who's horses are the aggressors.
I have never kept my horses to be a part of some idealistic contained version of a wild herd - I keep them as riding horses and for that they need to be sound.
There is nothing wrong with a bit of a scuffle & some squealing when you introduce a new horse - but when serious injury and risks to people handling their own horses becomes an issue that is different
I hope you do better on your new yard and your horse can settle down and relax - then you will be able to do that as well!!
Muppetgirl likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
gelding with attitude issue after gelding Bandy Horse Training 9 05-06-2012 04:45 AM
Aggresive Dogs and Horses JackofDiamonds Horse Riding 78 11-14-2010 02:06 AM
aggresive when getting in trouble,,,long...sorry jazzyrider Horse Training 20 08-22-2008 02:11 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0