anyone fall in love with a horse boarded on their property, and want to keep it? - Page 2
 
 

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anyone fall in love with a horse boarded on their property, and want to keep it?

This is a discussion on anyone fall in love with a horse boarded on their property, and want to keep it? within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Paso fino tail surgery
  • Cutting paso horse tails

 
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    01-01-2011, 11:13 PM
  #11
Weanling
No, here, let me make this easy for you. I copied and pasted. This is actually a neutral article, more on the "pro" rather than "con" side. You can google more onfo if you desire.
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Natural or Not?
Words that make Paso owners in the U.S. Cringe…..“What happened to that horses’ tail?”, “Why do they hold their tails so funny?”, “Is that natural?”. No matter what your opinion of tail alteration is, it is never comfortable explaining it to a Paso newcomer. Is it natural? Sometimes. Many Paso Finos exhibit the desired natural J look from birth, while others do not. In the past few decades, surgical tail alteration has been accepted as part of the breed culture in many Latin American countries. Some of which are the same countries that our beloved Paso Finos originate from. To many Latins and Americans alike, the enhancement of the tail is a thing of beauty and adds grace, elegance, and a polished appearance to the horse. It can be compared to certain dog breeds that cut and brace the ears or doc the tails to enhance the appearance of the dog. It is up to the owner how they would like their animal to look. On the other hand, those who are not accustomed to seeing the tails held in this fashion may not see them as beautiful right away. It seems strange at first. Then when they find out that sometimes it is done by a surgical procedure, it is more of a turn off. Furthermore, seeing a tail job that did not come out as planned is even more reason not to take the chance. These are just some of the points that can be found on either side of the issue.
There are many differing points of view on this topic coming from varying backgrounds, cultures, and ages. Stephanie LaRicci, an American teen from Miami, age 17, has been in the Paso Fino breed for 12 years. ”A Paso Fino looks absolute and polished when it has its tail done. It highlights the impulsive and vibrating rear end muscles of a Paso. It definitely makes them look classy and elegant in the show ring. AND I believe it should be legalized in the PFHA as long as the procedure is carried out by a trained individual. It is a characteristic and tradition in the breed, just like cutting a dog's ears or tail. This can be a stress free procedure if done correctly. The PFHA can even make sure the tail was done legally, by mandating some type of certification program for people who want to be qualified in the skill of tail cutting. If a horse shows with an "illegal" or uncertified tail modification, then it will be disqualified and subjected to harsher penalties.”
Carlos Jorge Ospina owns the farm El Carrusel located in Cali, Columbia. This thirty year old has been in the breed since he was four years old. “I am against tail alterations, but I recognize that some horses need it once or twice. It should not be a practice used regularly. There is no reason for horses to suffer because of commercial ambition. Sometimes it is necessary to perform the operation more than once in cases that the results are not satisfactory. I’ve seen several cases where 2 or even 3 operations are necessary. The goal here is to improve the tail position that is not ideal. The other subject is to injure the horses tail so that they keep it still during a competition or while it is shown to a buyer. This is performed many times and I consider it a brutal torture. This is not humane. If the tail movements known in Colombia as "colazos" are penalized and even prohibited, people will continue with these tortures. My position is to allow for the tails to be tied in competitino as it is done in Perú, Ecuador, etc. If this is allowed, people will not "injure" the horses tail in order to show it in a competition or while it is being sold. It is very nice to see a good horse with its tail completely straight and still during a show, but this often demands these type of procedures. If tails are allowed to be tied, horses will not suffer any more, this is my opinion, and a goal that I have.”
Candice Burger, age 46, has been involved with Paso Finos since 1972, the first four years in Puerto Rico where she first learned about the breed. She now resides in Florida. “I’ve owned nothing but Paso Finos ranging from pure Puerto Rican to pure Colombian. I’ve been a student of the breed most of my life. Currently my focus is strictly on breeding with some future promise to compete in Paso shows and other activities. I’ve witnessed three different methods of cutting a tail of which two are practiced in the Paso Fino breed. Like any procedure, there are risks of a badly done job; however, a skilled lay person in a sanitary environment can perform the procedure well with little discomfort for the horse. I consider the procedure strictly cosmetic that does not affect the ultimate performance of the horse. Tail alteration in the United States has a longer history with American breeds and so acceptance by my country is not a problem.
Do I practice tail alterations? I absolutely will not alter a tail. Owning Paso Fino horses has been one of the greatest blessings in my life. My choice is not based on whether tail alteration is right or wrong. I think everyone is entitled to follow their own course in the matter. I don’t alter tails because when I see a foal born, it is exactly the way nature designed it at that moment. I love J-tails and covet horses who display it naturally. There is not a finer vision than a finished Paso Fino well-rounded and collected with a flowing tail. However, how a horse balances himself and how that transmits into tail carriage is by nature’s design, not mine. It matters not whether I like the way a horse carries his tail naturally.
Would I vote for or against a tail altering rule? Depends; currently the PFHA rule intention is to prevent tail alteration. However, in my opinion the rule is weak, poorly structured and has no teeth. I’d rather not have the rule at all. The rule against tail alteration is highly emotional and deserves careful consideration. Instead, the PFHA process is arbitrary and capitulates depending on a voting mechanism that does not allow for thoroughness. Some parts of the rule are adopted while other parts are not or language is partially omitted. I’ve never voted for or against tail alteration because of the weak rule language. I’d only vote on the tail altering issue under these conditions:
 A full, encompassing discovery of tail alteration is performed from various countries that practice tail alteration.  All findings of this discovery are transparent and discussed in an open forum.  The discussion includes the membership of PFHA. The mechanism should be through a national effort to present the facts of the discovery not only through regional representatives and the publications, but through a concerted effort by the Educational Committee to all membership by any means necessary.  The rules proposed provide very specific guidance of what practice is prohibited (or accepted), how it will be detected, who will perform the detection, how the rule will be enforced, and how it will be implemented.  The proposed rule is given time for general review by all PFHA members with their inputs and a process for change and review.  The proposed rule is then voted on as “all or none” with the understanding this will become a permanent fixture in the PFHA mission for the breed. PFHA either adopts tail altering as part of the breed or it doesn’t with no opening for future deterioration of the rule language.”

Mary Holcombe is a newcomer to Paso Finos. Since being introduced to the breed just last year, she has spent many hours riding many different Pasos and is dedicated to learning about them before she makes a purchase. She lives in Simpsonville, South Carolina, an area where there are not many Paso Fino shows. The breed and it’s history are not as well known in these parts and she struggles to understand the reasoning behind the tail alteration. “From what I have seen, the tail looks more natural if not altered. I really don't see the point in trying to curl the tail. It does not seem to affect the horses performance. All it does is make me think that there is some kind of deformation in the tail. As for the rules of the PFHA, if the tail looks as if it has been altered, action should take place. If there is proof the tail has been altered in horses whose tail do not appear to be altered, then action should take place."
James Del Romero, a native Colombian who also has lived most of his adult life in the states feels passionately about the subject. “The current PFHA rule prevents surgical alterations to the Paso Fino horse , however in keeping with the tradition I believe that this change to the Paso Fino is not a damaging one. The creation of the "J tail" actually enhances the total picture of the Paso Fino horse and thus should be permitted as long as a qualified vet performs the procedure”
     
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    01-01-2011, 11:26 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Martini, I have to say that your post to Chum was extremely rude and uncalled for.

I hate bad grammar, too, but going off on her about that just because she said you were sensitive? A tad much, don't you think?



On topic, I have fallen for horses that weren't mine. My heart horse wasn't mine, although I did try to buy him....but we won't go down that sad road.

On the other hand of the issue, I keep my horse at my relative's barn. If they decided they loved Sun and tried to keep me from taking her... I'd be furious. Actually, my aunt once called Sunny her baby, and I was so angry.
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    01-01-2011, 11:53 PM
  #13
Weanling
Yes, you are right. I can't really say it was uncalled for, because even after her first comment, I was still friendly. I am guilty of bad grammar and of course I spell things wrong, it just comes off extra dumb when someone is trying to tell you that YOU are wrong for feeling the way you feel, and also telling you about horse personalities, tails of gaited horses, miniature horse behavior, etc. You *are* correct, though, in the sense that there is no reason for me to insult someone for any deficiencies they may have. That was wrong. I tried to see where I could edit my post, but I can't apparently. I do apologize. If you look at any of my past posts, I am never rude or argumentative.

As for your horse...of course you would not want someone to feel they can own your horse just because it is on their property., You do see the difference in the situation though, right? I mean, you visit your horse regularly, ride your horse, care for your horse? This owner has laid eyes on this horse *maybe* 10 times in the past two years. She is one of MANY horses that belong to him. She is a commodity, nothing more.

But alas, she does not belong to me, and I realize this. Just wanted to discuss it with others who have felt the same way, and I do appreciate their posts!
     
    01-02-2011, 12:32 AM
  #14
Green Broke
I certainly understand the differences in the situations, just giving you my personal experience.
Yes, I go to the barn every other day and take care of all the horses and do any chores necessary, all in exchange for keeping Sun on the property for free.

Your situation is almost identical to where I was a few years ago(aside from the ending), with my heart horse. I said I wouldn't go down that road, but...

My aunt and uncle kept a few horses for a friend of theirs. Aside from the day he dropped off the horses, he saw them once in many years, and that was when he came to bring their tack to me so I could work them. He didn't even get out and give them a pat.
There were two horses, and although I loved them both, I fell in love with Gunner(named by me), an amazing liver chestnut QH gelding. I stayed at that barn almost every weekend for over a year.
We offered to buy him, but the owner wouldn't budge. He said he had too much training to let us take him for what we were offering.
I'm going to sum up the ending quickly...
Gun foundered, no one did anything, the poor man limped around the pasture for a few months before the owner had to pay someone to take him...
If I would have had the knowledge of the owner trying to sell him I would have snatched him up...but one day I showed up to visit him, and he was gone.

Okay, enough reminiscing.
So I definitely see where you are coming from, and how you feel.
At least since the horse is in your care you don't have to worry about your story ending the way mine did.


Oh, and I know you aren't a rude poster, every other time I've seen you've been very polite.
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    01-02-2011, 04:34 AM
  #15
Trained
I work at a summer camp that has a herd of roughly 30 horses. About half are being sold off soon because they are either too old and need forever homes or are not camper safe (aka "wrangler horses"). The majority of the wranglers are buying their personal favourites because they'll go for cheap and not many people will want them anyway. My personal favourite of the herd is a 17-year old bay mare by the name of Poseidon. She is extremely overweight, swaybacked, and is very picky about who she likes in the herd. She's the alpha mare and dislikes every other mare in the herd. She is always at the end of a trail line because she will kick the other horses and is generally referred to as a "Beyotcchhhh" by the wranglers. She also earned her name from her love of swimming. She holds no reserves about just running into the lake. Haha.

However, about two years ago, when I met this dashing lady, I fell in love. I have a lovely relationship with her because I'm the only wrangler that actually likes her. I don't have to lead her, she'll just follow me. My friend Jeff tried it and she just turned around and walked away.

Part of me wishes she wasn't so well trained and extremely camper safe. I would buy her in a heartbeat. And I'm pretty sure Abby and Po won't get along this summer when I bring Abby. She'll be kept in different pasture anyway though.

This is Po (Poseidon). I wish I had a better picture of her body, but this is the best I have of her. Her only marking is a star that's being covered up. Also..there's a weird line on her nose that isn't there when you see her profile. I dunno. She's a cutie.


AHA! I found one! This picture does not even do her justice on how fat she is. Ugh

     
    01-02-2011, 05:00 PM
  #16
Weanling
Po-I am happy, though, that you will be able to be around her regularly (will you see her every summer? What about during the year?) and maybe there will be a time when she will be available to buy?

There is just something about a horse that "takes" to you. My DH was there when they loaded her in the trailer to bring to our house...he said he felt awful, she wouldn't get in the trailer and they were whipping her butt, then they lunged her and lunged her (not really a lunge line, just a long lead rope) to wear her out. Here's the thing, I *get* that some horses are $hitheads (LOL) and need to be roughed up a bit. From what I see, this little girl is sweet as pie with *ME*. My DH could not believe how she nuzzles my neck, follows me around the paddock, etc.

Po is gorgeous, love those markings, and love a big old thick horse like that!

Sunny-Your Gunner story is very sad, I am so sorry that happened to you! See, some horse owners (well, probably many, I am sad to say) aren't thinking of the horse's best interest. Is there any way you can follow up or find him?

---------------------------------
Sooo, what is funny if I have NEVER liked Paso Finos. Kind of made fun of them, as a matter of fact. I like *BIG* horses (well, and of course my minis) and I never liked gaited horses. I also know that Pasos are known for not so great temperments. I am already fantasizing about having her as my sweet trail horse...that's all I really want, a sweet, affectionate, smart horse to ride through the neighborhood bareback on.

I just bathed her, combed out her mane so pretty. She just loves attention.
     
    01-02-2011, 05:09 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtymartini    
Po-I am happy, though, that you will be able to be around her regularly (will you see her every summer? What about during the year?) and maybe there will be a time when she will be available to buy?
I think this might be my last summer working there, so it may be my last couple months seeing her, unless I come visit..which is extremely likely. And in the winter, they are kept in a pasture owned by someone our director knows. We keep them there because it's cheap, but he doesn't go out and check them regularly. Most of the wranglers live in the town they are kept, so we would be more than willing to go check up on them, but he posted it for trespassing if come anywhere near them. It's weird..but he's just a jerk in general. He's also sexist and there's only one guy wrangler out about 7 or 8.

And I don't think I'd be able to buy her for at least 10 years unless something happened. She's extremely well trained and generally likes people more than horses. She is one of those horses that knows what kind of rider is on her back and will perform accordingly. If I 8 year old kid is riding her, she's a charm (except when there's a horse she doesn't like behind her). If I ride her, you can bet as soon as I say she can go, she's off at a gallop.
     
    01-03-2011, 07:31 AM
  #18
Weanling
Wow, sounds like the perfect horse. I can see why you are so attached.

I am not an idiot who falls in love with every horses I see and meet. One of my minis...I love him because he is mine but you can tell he has no connection to me at all, I am strictly a food source. My other mini, he just needs to be worked with, he is sweet and wants attention (I swear, he is jealous of the new gal) but is still unsure, he came from a pretty rough place. Both my minis are about 10 years old. I am sure part of their personalities they were born with, and then part were formed by the humans they were around. This filly is nothing but sweetness, and I hate the thought of anyone doing anything rough with her!

I also don't want to spoil her *too* much, because I don't want her to miss it when she is gone. You know what I mean?

Sounds like Po is actually in a pretty decent place, for now. Keep your eye on her!
     

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