Barn Owners - Do you offer short-term board?
 
 

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Barn Owners - Do you offer short-term board?

This is a discussion on Barn Owners - Do you offer short-term board? within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        08-25-2014, 08:37 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    Barn Owners - Do you offer short-term board?

    My husband is starting a new job next week (yay!), so we're starting to look for a new property in a better location.
    Once we get moved to a better farm, we're considering the possibility of offering short-term/vacation/overnight boarding through the summer months. Just a couple horses at a time, nothing big.

    If this is something that you offer, have you discovered any challenges or considerations that are unique to short-term board compared to traditional long-term boarding?

    I would guess (gut instinct) that some of the biggest concerns would be keeping travellers "quarantined" from regular residents, making sure all health papers are in order and the horse actually looks healthy, and the right to refuse any horse.

    I got the idea because we are currently boarding a friend's mini for a few weeks (with a contract, of course) while they have new fencing installed, and I've never seen short-term boarding offered in our area.
    It seems like it would be a good thing to offer in cases such as theirs, if someone's going on vacation, if someone is moving and they need a place for their horses while they get settled, et cetera.
    Horseychick87 likes this.
         
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        08-27-2014, 12:07 AM
      #2
    Weanling
    I've looked into short term boarding myself.
    As you said quarantine would be the biggest challenge as each horse would need at least 400 square feet of space to move around in (minimum square footage for a dry lot 40x100) and would need to be at least 10 feet away from another horse. This could induce a large amount of stress on a horse even for a weeks stay.

    Then you'd have to sanitize the area after each stay, just incase as some illnesses don't show up for 2-3 weeks. The possibility of spreading illnesses around is greater for the boarders and the 'native herd'.

    Proper papers are a must! Coggins and proof of vaccination must be provided before the horse could come on the property.

    You'd also have to decide if you'd accept stallions or not. Liability increases with stallions, and thus your insurance may go up.

    Forms, liability releases, insurance, emergency plans, evacuation routes and such all come into play and can be made harder because of the unknown short term horses.

    But if laying all of that out and knowing you can do it, then I say go for it. I myself settled for being a horse sitter, LOL.
    MyJumper likes this.
         
        08-27-2014, 12:39 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Great info! Thank you!

    I've been able to find much more information on having a dog boarding kennel than I have on offering similar services for horses.
    I guess some things are easier to scale up than others :)

    I have a lot of research to look forward to - if this is something we decide to pursue, it'll probably be in 2+ years (assuming we're able to get moved next year).

    I'm putting together a notebook of all of the different ideas I've been having with what we could do with our new place, not only to make the most of where we're going to live next, but also to keep in mind what features we want to look for in the new property.

    If it doesn't pan out as a business, it may be better to have a nice area set aside for "horse sitting" for our friends.
    Horseychick87 likes this.
         
        08-27-2014, 09:28 AM
      #4
    Started
    When I was in undergrad I was moving between barns every year. I was at one place 9 months during school and another during the three summer months. Both barns were more than willing to accommodate us, and I appreciated it!
    Posted via Mobile Device
    stevenson and MyJumper like this.
         
        08-27-2014, 09:29 AM
      #5
    Green Broke
    We had horses stay for weekend periods, or over the winter months at my old place.

    So long as all injections are up to date, and the horse isn't sick then it's no problem.
    stevenson likes this.
         
        08-27-2014, 12:59 PM
      #6
    Weanling
    Another option you can offer is a stop over place for traveling horse people.

    There are several websites out there where people who want to take their horses on vacation or travel across the country can schedule certain stables along the way to let them rent a stall for a day or two to give the horse a rest.
    Some people plan a whole trip this way and it really works out nicely when people/horses need a break from the road trip!
    Horseychick87 likes this.
         
        08-27-2014, 02:31 PM
      #7
    Trained
    I do the occasional short term boarder, mainly overnight stays but I have had a couple who came and stayed for a week while waiting for a hauler. I have 2 oversized foaling stalls that are totally separate from the main barn and an arena that is separated from all the other areas where I would turn out.

    You're liability insurance will be astronomical. I pay over $7,000 a year for my home & ranch policy. If I didn't have a stallion and bring the odd mare here to breed, I would stop doing the short term boarding because I could drop the policy. Because I'm a breeding operation, I need the policy anyway and figured a few short term boarders would help defray the cost. And they do, but they're a lot of extra work.

    My stalls are matted and lined for safety and I strip the stalls and pull the mats after every short term horse stay and then I spray the entire thing down with antiseptic solution and let it air dry. I wash and disinfect the mats, water buckets, feed buckets and anything else used on the boarder horse. I keep all those supplies separate from my personal horse stuff. I also have video monitoring for these 2 stalls, because of doing foal watch and so I can keep an eye on any visitors in these stalls to make sure nobody is looking distressed or gets sick.

    You also will get horses that have not been trained well, are complete nervous wrecks and some that are just so flipped out by the whole process that they're fairly risky to handle. I notice those kinds of horses most when someone has bought a horse long distance and is shipping it home. They've been dropped off by one hauler and they're waiting for another one to come pick them up and finish the trip. Privately owned horses that come and stay for a night or 2, are usually not a problem because the owner will do 97% of the handling themselves.

    It's a lot of work but having used a few short term situations when I've been travelling, it's a very welcome thing for a traveller to find. You do have to make sure they have the correct, up to date paperwork and look healthy.

    I take pics at the trailer when they get off and again as they're being loaded. Just to be safe and I've had it stand me in good stead on one horse that was shipped here and waited a couple of days for a haul. The horse was skinny when it got here, was a flippin' loon and paced non-stop the entire time she was here. I took pics showing her condition when she arrived and recorded her weaving. Sure enough, when the horse got to her new home, the owner contacted me FURIOUS because the horse she got looked nothing like the sales pics she'd seen and the seller, of course, blamed the hauler and me. Because I had pictures of the horse coming OFF the trailer, skinny and poor condition and sent the pics and the video of her weaving, that took me right out of the loop for any litigation on that sale.
         
        08-27-2014, 09:11 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    I hadn't thought a lot about travelling horses, like what you all mentioned with waiting for haulers or vacationers passing through town.
    Those are some interesting considerations!
    If we do that, it might be worth setting up water/electric so people could hook up their trailer or camper... Especially if we end up in a place nearer the interstate or a tourist destination that draws in riders.

    I've looked a little bit at farm insurance policies, and thankfully my mom used to work in the insurance industry, so she can decode the terminology for me :)
    Still, I think that's probably going to be the most complex part.

    Do you mind me asking, do you just use a regular insurance company that does cars, homes, life, etc, or do you work with a special farm/ranch insurer?
         
        08-27-2014, 09:17 PM
      #9
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
    I do the occasional short term boarder, mainly overnight stays but I have had a couple who came and stayed for a week while waiting for a hauler. I have 2 oversized foaling stalls that are totally separate from the main barn and an arena that is separated from all the other areas where I would turn out.

    You're liability insurance will be astronomical. I pay over $7,000 a year for my home & ranch policy. If I didn't have a stallion and bring the odd mare here to breed, I would stop doing the short term boarding because I could drop the policy. Because I'm a breeding operation, I need the policy anyway and figured a few short term boarders would help defray the cost. And they do, but they're a lot of extra work.

    My stalls are matted and lined for safety and I strip the stalls and pull the mats after every short term horse stay and then I spray the entire thing down with antiseptic solution and let it air dry. I wash and disinfect the mats, water buckets, feed buckets and anything else used on the boarder horse. I keep all those supplies separate from my personal horse stuff. I also have video monitoring for these 2 stalls, because of doing foal watch and so I can keep an eye on any visitors in these stalls to make sure nobody is looking distressed or gets sick.

    You also will get horses that have not been trained well, are complete nervous wrecks and some that are just so flipped out by the whole process that they're fairly risky to handle. I notice those kinds of horses most when someone has bought a horse long distance and is shipping it home. They've been dropped off by one hauler and they're waiting for another one to come pick them up and finish the trip. Privately owned horses that come and stay for a night or 2, are usually not a problem because the owner will do 97% of the handling themselves.

    It's a lot of work but having used a few short term situations when I've been travelling, it's a very welcome thing for a traveller to find. You do have to make sure they have the correct, up to date paperwork and look healthy.

    I take pics at the trailer when they get off and again as they're being loaded. Just to be safe and I've had it stand me in good stead on one horse that was shipped here and waited a couple of days for a haul. The horse was skinny when it got here, was a flippin' loon and paced non-stop the entire time she was here. I took pics showing her condition when she arrived and recorded her weaving. Sure enough, when the horse got to her new home, the owner contacted me FURIOUS because the horse she got looked nothing like the sales pics she'd seen and the seller, of course, blamed the hauler and me. Because I had pictures of the horse coming OFF the trailer, skinny and poor condition and sent the pics and the video of her weaving, that took me right out of the loop for any litigation on that sale.


    I am at $7800 per year , for my liability policy. I am a breeding operation too. Oddly enough, even if I get rid of all the stallions that come and go and the mares, and just keep my own, I would only save maybe $800 per year. Just to have a piece of livestock on the property, that you occasionally take off for even a trail ride is extremely expensive. We show, so god forbid a horse gets loose and damages something, we can't live without the insurance.
         
        08-28-2014, 02:09 AM
      #10
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BadWolf    
    I hadn't thought a lot about travelling horses, like what you all mentioned with waiting for haulers or vacationers passing through town.
    Those are some interesting considerations!
    If we do that, it might be worth setting up water/electric so people could hook up their trailer or camper... Especially if we end up in a place nearer the interstate or a tourist destination that draws in riders.

    I've looked a little bit at farm insurance policies, and thankfully my mom used to work in the insurance industry, so she can decode the terminology for me :)
    Still, I think that's probably going to be the most complex part.

    Do you mind me asking, do you just use a regular insurance company that does cars, homes, life, etc, or do you work with a special farm/ranch insurer?
    I have my policy through Jarvis Ins, they have everything but my vehicles covered. sandrajarvis@jarvisinsurance.com, let them know I referred you if you ask for a quote. They have treated me very right. I lost a small barn in a tornado last year and they got me paid right out, in full.

    For a commercial boarding operation, you have to go with a Farm/Ranch company, residential won't cover you for the liability and they won't want to cover your residence because it's attached to the boarding part which opens them up to liability. I even talked to a couple of companies who turned me down just because I had horses, never mind how many or whether or not they were stallions. Just didn't want to insure a horse property.

    Here's a link to the Jarvis site: C. Jarvis Insurance | Home
    BadWolf and Horseychick87 like this.
         

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