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Cannot STAND this horse!

This is a discussion on Cannot STAND this horse! within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        11-17-2013, 04:02 PM
      #11
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BlueHoney5775    
    I think my horse is fine, I just am sick of this horse who is not truly dominant ( her owner tells me she has always been bottom mare with 3 or more horses.)not letting me near my horse. I have always sent her off away from me, with a lead rope or throwing my hands. She isn't head mare, just a kinda dumb, young horse who thinks she has to have it all. Really when there are no people around, everything is okay, so I get ticked at this horse who is rude when I'm there. And thank you for not being a jerk!!
    No horse is rude and you do not have a clue about her thoughts ( thinks she has to have it all]}
    She is simply asserting her position in the herd. Natural instinctive behavior.
    Ascribing human traits to animals does not explain their behavior and does neither the horse or the human any good. Shalom
    Shropshirerosie likes this.
         
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        11-17-2013, 05:08 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dbarabians    
    No horse is rude
    I beg to differ, horses can be rude. In the dictionary the word "rude" has a few definitions.
    Quote:
    dictionary.com
    Without culture, learning, or refinement: rude, illiterate peasants.

    Rough in manners or behavior; unmannerly; uncouth.

    Rough, harsh, or ungentle: rude hands.
    I know many horses that fit this, on in particular is a certain half draft yearling (he'll be 2 in spring) that my horse is regularly turned out with. He is constantly in your face. My horse is easy to catch but I can't catch him because the yearling is always pushing himself between us and even tries to put his head in my horses halter. He's always pushing me and knocking me around wanting my attention. Even if I give him attention it's never enough. He rushes at my horse when I'm trying to lead him, chews his mane, tail and blankets. Even if I just try to take a picture of my horse, yearling has to push in front of my horse just as I'm clicking the shutter, it never fails.

    This is a little guy that is in need of manners...no manners=rude.

    I feel for the OP!

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    KigerQueen likes this.
         
        11-18-2013, 01:10 AM
      #13
    Trained
    There is nothing going on with those two horses that is not instinctive behavior. Survival of the fittest. Period.
    The mare is being aggressive to put the other mare in her rightful place in the herd. Trying to imagine another reason is ridiculous.
    Corporal has already mentioned what the proper term is anthromorphizing. L
    Look that definition up cinnywhinny. It certainly fits what the Op and you are doing. Shalom
         
        11-18-2013, 08:18 AM
      #14
    Green Broke
    In many species, including humans there are instinctive behaviors. That doesn't mean that they are rude. Any human and animal needs to be taught MANNERS to be good citizens. It is natural for us to fart, belch, etc. Children interupt, yell indoors etc. These things are naturally in is, but that doesn't mean that it isn't rude to do them. It's called manners. Stabled horses need to be taught manners and usually are. We don't let our dogs rip up our furniture and clothing just because it's their instinct to do so, do we? Just like it seems to be YOUR instinct to criticize us and argue with our comments about horses that need to have better manners because of where they are homed.
    Glenknock and BlueHoney5775 like this.
         
        11-18-2013, 08:55 AM
      #15
    Trained
    I think that we are having a discussion on semantics. What does rude mean? To me, a rude horse is one that tries to dominate over humans. Once a horse is allowed to get away with this, it can progress. The horse can become extremely dangerous.

    Call it rude. Call it instinctive behavior. We are trying to teach horses to go against their instincts; otherwise, there is no way that we can handle them. They become dangerous, wild animals.
         
        11-21-2013, 09:42 PM
      #16
    Foal
    I feel your pain. I have 2 thoroughbreds that were being pasture boarded with 6 other horses. They are bottom of the herd and do not have a single mean bone in their body. Unfortunately because they are so calm and submissive, they are just beaten on. They both are covered in marks and missing chunks of hair all over. I finally had to pay to have them moved to a dry lot so they could be alone. Now they are alone and neither one of them have a mark on them. Sometimes I love having such submissive horses, but other times it makes me so sad.
    BlueHoney5775 likes this.
         
        11-21-2013, 10:41 PM
      #17
    Started
    I had a horse stalled next to my TB mare years ago, who was quite mean. I even put hotwire up so he couldn't reach into where she eats. Unfortunately her gate was right next to his stall, so he's lunge and bite her every time I took her out or put her away. Of course the owner thought the horse was a saint. Got so bad, that my tb actually punctured her hip bolting into the stall one day when he tried going after her again.

    Had my Arab in several different pastures, and she was fine in the first two, but the last one, the TB mare who was the lead mare, would bite the crap out of my mare, leaving really large nasty bloody wounds on her body. My mare wasn't very dominant, but was quite quick, and had only ended up with the occasional bite mark (that I could see anyways), in the first two pastures, but every single day I came out, she had a new bite wound from this mare. It was annoying because they were so visible, and the owner didn't believe her horse bit other horses. Then a new young Quarter Horse got added to the herd, and the other horses started getting their tails chewed. Now, understanding herd dynamics, my mare being on the BOTTOM of the pecking order, none of the other horses are going to stand around and let her chew their tails, nor will she being the least dominant horse, want to get that close to the lead horse to do that. Yet, the bo (and owner of the TB) blamed my horse (who'd been in the pasture without incident for a couple months at that point), like a) I could do anything about it if it was, and b) like the low man on the totem pole would ever try that. I wasn't paying board, I was working it off, and we'd already kind of had a falling out, so of course she didn't want to blame the paying clients horse. Of course right after my horse left, they moved the Quarter Horse into the barn. I understood putting my mare in pasture, that she'd get the occasional bite, they are horses after all, but when the owner thinks their horse is so sweet, and would never do that, that's what gets on my nerves the most. Glad I don't have to deal with that person anymore.
         
        11-22-2013, 11:22 AM
      #18
    Started
    Sounds like normal herd behavior to me.

    If this horse walked up and bit you, that would be rude.
    If she walks up and bites your horse to move her out of the way, that is herd behavior.
    faiza425 likes this.
         
        11-22-2013, 01:04 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Heh, horses can totally be rude xD
    Glenknock likes this.
         
        11-30-2013, 06:37 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    I feel your pain. For a while Shakira lived with a Chunky Chestnut (from here on referred to as CC) who was a bully. Everyone kept telling md it was "normal behavior" but he would beat her up when I went to catch her, beat her up when I turned her out. Pin his ears when I rode past and kick her if I dared praise her inhis company. It got worse, when I went tofetch her Iin he started to block me, pin his ears and show his bum. I used to push him away and keep walking. I should have acted then but didn't. Finally it got to the point where Shakira didn't want to go into her field. She would have cuts all over her sides and quarters and she would spook at him when she saw him out riding. One day as I took her back into the pasture he stepped infront of the closes gate, trapping both me and my horse up againest the fence. He pivoted, before proceeding to double barrel kick us both. I was trapped in a corner and literally felt his hooves scrap past my shoulder, chin and cheek. My pony shot free and he turned his attentions to me, advancing with teeth bared.

    I snapped.

    Screaming obscenities I snatched up a lead and belted him hard. Raising welts across his shoulders and sides I shouted at him to get his CC rump away from me nd my baby. He bolted away and I stumbled after him. Maybe it was excessive, but he had almost killed me.

    When I caught my pony to take her out of the pasture again a few moments later, he blocked our routes once more.leting go of Shakira I stepped forward, raising my arms and snarling. CC backed away and I lead Shakira of the pasture. We moved the next day.

    Natural instincts are one thing, but make sure your pasture mates behaviours are confined to your horse. Sorry about the bad spelling and grammar im on the phone.
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