Self care boarding vs full care-why & why not? - Page 5
 
 

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Self care boarding vs full care-why & why not?

This is a discussion on Self care boarding vs full care-why & why not? within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Diy horse boarding barns what does it mean
  • How to set up a self care boarding facility

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    02-01-2012, 01:37 PM
  #41
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgertrot    

So I help her set up everything and told her that we can do complete self care. The benefit being we get to see/pet horses daily and get money but don't have to care for them.
Who fixes fence? Cleans the turnouts? Hauls manure? Insurance?
     
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    02-01-2012, 04:22 PM
  #42
Weanling
Me and boyfriend do maintainence (there's not much really), horse owners clean turnouts, we have space for a manure pile that people take for fertilizing, and boyfriends mom took care of insurance.
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    02-01-2012, 04:29 PM
  #43
Foal
I think the key is really to find responsible owners. That is the bottom line to having self care work out. However, there are so many BO around, that can't even take care of their properties and animals (not necessarily BO that have boarders, but just keep their own horses), that it really comes down to chance of finding good suitable DIY boarders.
     
    02-05-2012, 12:55 AM
  #44
Foal
Can someone define what "full care" might mean in any formal way? I realize this can vary. I have only owned our horse for 3-4 years and never owned my own prior to that knowing that horse ownership is demanding and cost of care & vet bills can be forbiddingly expensive on a modest salary. However, I cannot keep my girl's horse at home; we adore him and he is great therapy for all of us. So, we have had him 3 places in 3-4 years, trained him as a 4H project etc....he is a kind, though spirited gelding. Our moves have been mostly due to "constant rule changing" and the facilities managers' willingness to do only minimal care)....each one has had different versions of what they will and will not do as part of "full care" and each facility varies greatly in standards of care; while seemingly changing the rules as they go along. When a boarding facility says "full care" I once assumed that meant any and all care either requested by an owner (within reason) or whatever is reasonably necessary for the general well being of the horse EVERY SINGLE DAY regardless if owner is present or not. IS there a formal definition for "full care" any where at any "horse association" websites? Where is the line drawn typically? How much feed should be provided to an average horse? Alfalfa limits? Is it common to put a cap on how much they will feed if not requiring a "special diet". And how often should hay be offered...3x or 2x daily? What if boarders feel the horses aren't getting "ample" hay and alfalfa for them to feel "comfortable". It seems they are more "agressive" at pasture if only fed "minimally". Is it appropriate to set a limit on amount of hay/alfalfa vs. "whatever it takes"? Is it unreasonable to expect ones horse to be turned out on the schedule promised or ask to be promptly notified (ie: morning turnout is cancelled frequently due to weather/construction etc... without any daily/regular notice or e-posting to boarders). I find this problematic because if my 10 yr old gets on this horse that's been cooped up all day or for several days its hard on her and the horse (even dangerous). Even if we lounge him it's sometimes not enough if he's been cooped up for several dAys in a row. There is no way for us to know in retrospect if he has been out or not if we arrive "after business hours". Lastly, Is blanketing and unblanketing daily during winter considered reason for extra charges? My horse is a Mustang and is sometimes feisty and anxious to get blanket off and get turned out. He can be pushy especially with littler people or inexperienced handlers; and it can be intimidating to someone who is not very horse saavy. He doesn't buck or try to hurt anyone, he's just feisty and can move about quickly in anticipation to get out to pasture. Personally I'd rather he not be blanketed at all, but my kids see others doing it and think this hardy mustang needs same after a late evening workout in winter. If he gets feisty, people won't take it off in the morning saying he "scares them" and turning him into the "no no bad horse". Is it reasonable to expect someone on staff that is saavy to have to do the blanket/turnout? Or at least request a phone call notice that no one has done so?

The "rule" has been that he gets turned out first to reduce his anxiousness and reduce danger to the blanket/turnout crew. Is it fair that if the person responsible gets scared they just leave him in with his blanket on and dont' call to let me know? Hmmmm. Full Care, just what does that mean in a "professional" facility?
     
    02-05-2012, 10:45 AM
  #45
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endeavors    
The "rule" has been that he gets turned out first to reduce his anxiousness and reduce danger to the blanket/turnout crew. Is it fair that if the person responsible gets scared they just leave him in with his blanket on and dont' call to let me know? Hmmmm. Full Care, just what does that mean in a "professional" facility?

Full care at a professional facility varies greatly (as I'm sure you've noticed). Typically it involves regular feeding (at the amount required to keep your horse healthy) and turn out. What is important is to read your boarders release or contract.... whatever they give to you to sign that tells you what the farm does. If they don't stick to it, politely bring it up. If they fail to hold up their end... say notifying you because they've cancelled turnout or that your horse needs it's blanket removed, then that's a breach of contract and you can up and move... In my opinion... others may have something else to say.

Blanketing here is typically included, however, I have a horse that was difficult to blanket when I originally purchased him. He was randomly terrified of his clothes. He still acts stupid in the early fall... so I make it a point to change his blanket till he settles. It's a pain, but it's part of being his owner and keeping the barn staff from possibly getting hurt.

The most important thing in boarding and training is communication. If they are not doing what you think they should be, then it needs to be addressed. Perhaps they are wrong, perhaps you are.
     
    02-05-2012, 11:13 AM
  #46
Trained
My board contract states:

DCA agrees to provide a clean facility and appropriate feed and water required to maintain the animal:

Stall: _____________ Mare Motel Corral: ______________ Pasture: Payment is due upon arrival.

Horse Owner agrees that he/she will pay DCA for the aforementioned facilities, feed and services the total sum of $________ per month in advance.

I will turn out before cleaning stalls, but I don't guarantee turnout every day, though that's pretty much what happens and there's no charge, IF the horse can go out in the herd. If the owner wants private turnout, that's a higher level of service and there's a charge. If the owner provides a blanket for foul weather, I will blanket mid-day if it's warranted, then remove the sheet or blanket after the storm is over and I don't generally charge for these service. However, if you want the horse blanketed and unblanketed daily, there will be a charge. For one horse it's not that timely but you multiply that by 20-30 horses, 2X/day, and you're talking a significant amount of time every day.

I feed 2X/day normally, though when I've gotten in a boarder's horse who looks a bit thin, I frequently will do a 3rd feeding until they are up to where I like them to be (and that has NEVER been thinner than an owner likes the horse to be). If a horse is a hard keeper and requires more/special feeds or feeding, then the monthly rate for that horse will be higher. I say I feed 2X/day and that's true for concetrates and night hay, but during the day when they are out they have free access to round bales of hay. Here in OK I do not feed alfalfa because of blister beetles. If an owner wanted the horse fed alfalfa they would have to provide it and they would have to either provide it in cubed or pelleted form or proof that it came from a blister beetle free state. I'll happily feed it, no extra charge in those circumstances. I require supplements to be in Smart Paks and delivered here, they can be ordered through the Barn Buddy program and shipped for free. I don't charge for feeding the Smart Paks. If the boarder wants the horse groomed daily, that can be done too, but there would be a charge for that.

That pretty much describes FULL board at my place.
     

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