Stable responsibility when they injure a horse
   

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Stable responsibility when they injure a horse

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  • Who is responsible if a horse is injured in my stable

 
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    03-29-2012, 04:42 PM
  #1
Foal
Stable responsibility when they injure a horse

Hi. I'm trying to ascertain what the standard is in the industry for this.

I'm leasing a horse who is in a training program at the stable. The horse is trained 3 days a week by the training staff. I did not ride the horse for 2 months, as was out of the country, and when I returned - the horse was lame. After non-complete explanations about what had happened, I found out from the owner it had been incurred an injury during training by the staff (the owner does not ride him) - though I am still unsure of the full story. I am continuing to pay the lease, but he is still lame.

I totally understand that these things happen. But my question is -- if I had been riding this horse during that time period, I would be held accountable for the vet bills, etc. I'm wondering why the stable is not held accountable for the bills now? Furthermore - as the horse is layed up, it strikes me odd that they are continuing to bill the owner for "training fees", as the horse cannot be ridden -- and I am continuing to pay to lease him -- to "reserve" him for when he's better -- whenever that might be.

I'm not sure how to feel about it. Is it my responsibility to lease this horse through his injury -- as if I owned the horse, I certainly couldn't walk away (but that's why we lease, right - and it is a month to month agreement). Or should I be angry that the stable has cost me so much money already when they caused this in the first place?

Any thoughts?
     
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    03-29-2012, 04:49 PM
  #2
mls
Trained
Part of most standard training agreeements is a phrase that covers "injuries that occur during the course of training". Since a horse being trained is learning something new, there is really no way to know how it may react. Freak out during first saddling, bath, tie session? It happens.

Our lease contracts state that any injury as a direct fault of the person leasing - they are responsible for vet bills. A pasture injury, etc goes to the owner of the horse.

If you were out of the country for two months, who paid the lease for that time? Honestly not sure why you would lease a horse in training.
     
    03-29-2012, 05:04 PM
  #3
Foal
Thanks so much for replying! That makes sense that there would be a clause by the stable for injury. I paid the lease while I was away - I felt bad stopping and starting, even though it is a month to month agreement. I like the owner and have been told by stable management that she needs the money - so I felt bad. I'm just not sure how much longer I should "feel bad" and continue to pay to lease a horse that can't be ridden.

The horse is in training b/c the owner cannot ride him.
     
    03-29-2012, 05:12 PM
  #4
mls
Trained
Is the horse trained enough for 'most' folks to ride?

It's great that you want to help the owner out - however in all fairness, I would communicate to her the reason you are leasing! Which I would assume is to ride?
     
    03-29-2012, 05:51 PM
  #5
Foal
Thanks. :)

Yep - the horse is perfectly trained - I've never had a single issue with him. He's adorable. I've owned/showed horses my whole life but am new to the West Coast --so when the stable owner tells me it's the "norm" here for all horses to be in training, I just figure they do things differently here. Most of the horses at my stable are in training - it seems mostly for exercise, as even the $100K eventers are being "trained". Then I had to put my leased horse on supplements b/c it "wasn't fair to the horse" since he was being ridden/trained so much - which they, of course, gladly charge me for.

It's all seeming a bit strange to me. I've showed H/J forever and I never had my horse in training, except when I was being trained on him. So now with this injury / lease issue -- I'm just a bit out of my comfort zone. So I'm starting to ask around.

I appreciate the input.
     
    03-29-2012, 06:24 PM
  #6
Yearling
I'm from Colorado, so not quite the West Coast, but that seems bizarre. Why lease a horse you can't ride? That's what people own them for. ;) The beauty of the lease is that if things go south with a horse, you can bail.
     
    03-29-2012, 07:11 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by crossfitgal    
Thanks. :)

Yep - the horse is perfectly trained - I've never had a single issue with him. He's adorable. I've owned/showed horses my whole life but am new to the West Coast --so when the stable owner tells me it's the "norm" here for all horses to be in training, I just figure they do things differently here. Most of the horses at my stable are in training - it seems mostly for exercise, as even the $100K eventers are being "trained". Then I had to put my leased horse on supplements b/c it "wasn't fair to the horse" since he was being ridden/trained so much - which they, of course, gladly charge me for.

It's all seeming a bit strange to me. I've showed H/J forever and I never had my horse in training, except when I was being trained on him. So now with this injury / lease issue -- I'm just a bit out of my comfort zone. So I'm starting to ask around.

I appreciate the input.
I have found the same thing with reiners. Switching from H/j, where my experience was similar to yours. THey are all in training-for life, it seems. I don't get it, but for the trainers-nice gig if you can get it! I personally think it is rewarding to train your own if you have the ability.

As far as who is responsible-mine is at the trainers right now. I am the owner, not the lessee. If he gets hurt, I am guessing it is my issue. I would have to review the contract. But I also had to have major medical and mortality, which I never have before. I suspect that may be in part because the trainer has lost horses in a fire before, and is a little paranoid-which I get.
     
    03-31-2012, 03:10 PM
  #8
Weanling
Usually the burden of medical bills falls on the horse owner UNLESS there is a clear indication that somebody caused the injury. Accidents happen. Usually, no one is "at fault".
     
    03-31-2012, 03:48 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
I have found the same thing with reiners.
Yes, I have as well. Most of the reiners my uncle has sold have either stayed in training at their barn while the owner comes to ride and show, or they take the horse to a closer stable for constant training. Either way, they are almost always "in training" until retirement.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:22 PM
  #10
Green Broke
If its a month to month, I would definetly be stopping the month when I couldnt ride it, either because I was gone or especially now that it is injured.
The vet bill part is going to come down to what your lease says. So will the fees the barn is charging the owner.
     

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