Storms in MN making me nervous
   

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Storms in MN making me nervous

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  • I am nervous during thunderstorms
  • Storms in mn

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    06-19-2012, 12:04 PM
  #1
Weanling
Storms in MN making me nervous

I live in minnesota and there have been some REALLY nasty storms lately that are making me really b=nervous, especially since my horse is boarded in a pasture.... last nnight I woke up to the entire house shaking with thunder and I was up all night worrying about my poor horse standing under the thin shelter with the 15 other horses...this morning I got up (way too early for the first day of my summer vacay, I might add) and checked my e mail. There was an e mail from the BO telling me that all the horses were fine and the barn was fine, but the roof blew off the next-door lesson barn.. all the horses were o k but the roof of their barn was now laying in front of our barn. I wnt out and checked on my horse, all ok except some scratches and bites from fighting his way into the shelter. The only problem is now I am going to get SUPER paranoid during all storms!!! Ahhhhhh!!! Sorry I just needed to vent about that...
     
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    06-21-2012, 05:39 PM
  #2
Weanling
He's getting kicked and bit trying to get into the shelter? I would see if there is a herd he can move to where that won't happen.

I hope you are not up in Duluth with the flooding. Lots of animals lives lost :( makes me feel very fortunate I am 3 hours south of there.
jaydee likes this.
     
    06-22-2012, 08:53 AM
  #3
Super Moderator
Field safety

Quote:
Originally Posted by NeuroticMare    
He's getting kicked and bit trying to get into the shelter? I would see if there is a herd he can move to where that won't happen.

I hope you are not up in Duluth with the flooding. Lots of animals lives lost :( makes me feel very fortunate I am 3 hours south of there.
The December 1st 2011 issue of Horse & Hound (UK) published a report based on figures from Vets and Insurance Companies that showed that 62% of injuries that involved the need for a vets attention and/or insurance claims occured in the field and urged owners to think carefully about how they kept their horses in turn-out. I started riding 'properly' when I was 8, that was 53 years ago, I've owned ponies/horses and also worked with them at one time ever since. I have taken part in many things from mounted games to hunting, even a couple of Team Chases and been fortunate enough to never have more than some minor sprains, cuts & scrapes to my horses yet I lost one wonderful talented horse from a kick in the field by a 13.2 pony that shattered its back leg above the hock and another young horse that should have had a brilliant future ahead of him lost when another horse reared up and landed on his back. In neither case was the pasture overcrowded, field shelters can be real hazards when horses are competing for space in them, especially if you have a 'bully' amongst them, they can too easily get trapped and have nowhere to go to escape
Can you not find somewhere with a stable? I honestly don't know how anyone can manage a horse without one or at least access to one when needed
     
    06-22-2012, 10:09 AM
  #4
Showing
Praying he makes it through the storms
     
    06-22-2012, 04:27 PM
  #5
Weanling
Jaydee, that is interesting, and one I can totally see. My horses were out with a large group (16 horses) in a smaller area for the last years for their turnout, they were in their stalls during bad weather, but my mare saw the vet twice for pasture related injuries, one a shod horse mounted her and scraped her back/hips, and another she got kicked above her hind fetlock, which actually ruptured a vessel so she has permanent swelling (but luckily no pain).

I moved my horses earlier this month and the turnout situation makes such a huge difference. My mare is out with one other horse during the day and they come in at night. My gelding goes out with 4 other geldings during the day, but the pasture is a little over 10 acres with two large run-in sheds, so they have room to sprawl out, he is in at night as well.

Skyhorse, I am in MN too, and know a lot of the barns around here, if you need some advice, let me know :)
     
    06-22-2012, 05:07 PM
  #6
Weanling
I never worry about the horses at night. If theres a storm they have to deal with it. And with the the thunder and lighting we have had in mn this last week they should be use to it by now. Some horses will stay in the rain and thunder. There horses they will be fine.
waresbear likes this.
     
    06-23-2012, 03:22 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
Lightning and horses

Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboy bowhunter    
I never worry about the horses at night. If theres a storm they have to deal with it. And with the the thunder and lighting we have had in mn this last week they should be use to it by now. Some horses will stay in the rain and thunder. There horses they will be fine.
I'm glad that you are so optimistic, its one of those things that has to be your choice.
None of my horses are what I'd call spooky, they have all lived through enough thunderstorms to be used to them, two of them are as close to being bombproof in traffic as a horse can be, mainly because we ride in heavy traffic far more in the UK than the US seem too - since we came here I've never seen another horse on the roads and we live in an area with a lot of horses. Three of ours came to the US by trailer, boat and plane and coped 100% with it all. They are still not happy in lightning storms.
My husband comes from a farming background, over the years he has seen enough cattle struck by lightning to confirm that it is not a pretty sight but at least they didn't have names or had years of hard work & training put into them, not to mention being loved.
In 2011 26 US people were killed by lightning strikes, many others survived strikes, in 1942 with a smaller population 432 people died, the drop in numbers is attributed to the increase in awareness and people taking heed of advice to get indoors in storms
The US Dept of Agriculture attributes 80% of all livestock deaths to lightning strikes and fatalities in animal strikes is way higher than in humans, partly because of their higher body mass and partly due to the fact that its often to late to give possible life saving assistance by the time they are found
Last nights storm here dropped two healthy trees onto different sections of our fence, if my horses had been out they could have been miles away by the time we got up this morning, they could have been standing under those trees. Where do most horses stand in storms/heavy rain? Under trees, where is one of the worst places to stand in a lightning storm? Under a tree
I value my horses, it took me ages to find a new one to suit me when I retired my older mare and the new one is still to me a work in progress and will probably never match up to her predecessor.
I know a lot of people have no option but I know where I prefer our lot to be. We have a smoke/fire alarm linked to the house, each stall can open directly to the outside. I sleep better at night knowing where they are. But that's just me, we are all entitled to manage our horses the way we see as best for them.
     
    06-24-2012, 09:16 PM
  #8
Weanling
[QUOTE=NeuroticMare;1559632]He's getting kicked and bit trying to get into the shelter? I would see if there is a herd he can move to where that won't happen.

I hope you are not up in Duluth with the flooding. Lots of animals lives lost :( makes me feel very fortunate I am 3 hours south of there.[/QUOTE]


No I live south of duluth, bout half hour from mineapolis, thank goodness!!!!!! And the shelter is tiny and he is still new to the herd. If it keeps happening, I will move him but he has never actually been injured, he fights just as hard:)
     
    06-24-2012, 11:42 PM
  #9
Showing
My two leave the barn to go stand in the driving rain. I suspect the metal roof is too noisy for their keen hearing.
     
    06-25-2012, 02:35 PM
  #10
Yearling
Think of it this way - If something really, really critically serious comes through, you want them in the field. You want them to be able to run away from a twister, or not be under a falling roof, bashed by branches. While they may not be comfy, it sure beats being nonexistent. I am terrified of twisters, (actually have Lilapsophobia) so I feel your pain :/
     

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