"Tweens" in the barn? - Page 2
   

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"Tweens" in the barn?

This is a discussion on "Tweens" in the barn? within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        09-02-2011, 09:19 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iridehorses    
    As a BO, I would sent out (as well as post) the new rules. If you have barn meeting, then that may be a good place to bring them up. Doing it that way, you are not targeting anyone in particular.
    That is a great idea! The only problem is that we don't really have "barn meetings", so it would probably be obvious who the targeted audience is? Do you suppose that approaching them from the perspective that "The horse has developed behavioral issues that make riding more dangerous than it was prior to our arrangements... as such, I find it necessary to revise our original agreement" is reasonable? I always approach them when they don't have an audience, and when I have corrected the child, it is when she has been in the arena without other riders present (if that is relevant?). I do that so I don't embarrass them...
         
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        09-02-2011, 10:54 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    I saw that the OP was an instructor but she said she wasnt the instructor of the rider in question.
    As an owner you are free to set whatever rules you want, as long as you arnt violating any current lease/board agreements. The new rules can then take effect with renewals. I wouldnt think, a "No minors without parents, or guardian appointed in writing present" would be out of line, as you see changing rules for certain people are casueing problems.
    RitzieAnn likes this.
         
        09-02-2011, 11:14 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    How about something along the lines,

    "Now that we've had x number of months of me supervising the young adults riding without their parents being there, I've had time to observe and evaluate the situation. Keeping safety and good horsemanship in mind, here are the following amendments (or Rules if you had no rules before) so that everyone's riding time is educational and enjoyable."

    Then state your rules.
         
        09-02-2011, 12:26 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Red Gate Farm    
    How about something along the lines,

    "Now that we've had x number of months of me supervising the young adults riding without their parents being there, I've had time to observe and evaluate the situation. Keeping safety and good horsemanship in mind, here are the following amendments (or Rules if you had no rules before) so that everyone's riding time is educational and enjoyable."

    Then state your rules.
    Thanks! I think that is an honest, non confrontational approach... I think that is what I will try. I spent time this morning writing some rules and an additional liability waiver as it relates directly to the situation. Will keep you posted...the people at our farm are very nice and in our encounters thus far are very reasonable. It is of utmost importance to me to approach this (and all potential "issues"for that matter) in a manner that is thoughtful and respectful, and nonconfrontational. When frustrated, I think it is helpful to get a few different perspectives! Thanks!
    Red Gate Farm likes this.
         
        09-02-2011, 12:59 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iridehorses    
    The first time a child does something dangerous (to herself or the horse) and gets hurt, there will be a parent ready to sue because an instructor (or at least an adult) was there and did nothing to prevent it.
    I was about to post the same when I read this. You sound very concerned about making anyone feel bad by approaching them about this, sillyhorses, but you have to consider that it's very likely a parent wouldn't hesitate to sue you the moment their child is seriously hurt.

    I think Red Gate Farm's suggestion is great, and would think these kids' parents would be very receptive to it so long as you couch your approach in terms of your interest in their children's welfare.
         
        09-15-2011, 04:44 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Does everyone that rides at your property sign a waiver??
         
        09-15-2011, 05:04 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    I'm wondering how the talk about the rules went?
         
        09-20-2011, 11:31 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    Hey everyone! Sorry for the delay in an update, we've been pretty busy.

    Since the school year has begun, the youth in the barn have not been coming out without parents. I don't anticipate they will be, at least until a school holiday or such. It has given me some time to make some updates to our board contracts, and at the end of the actual boarding contract is a request/waiver for barn owner supervising the child's activities.

    We have some pretty tight contracts and waivers here at our farm, and always have. We had an attorney help us get our boarding contracts, waivers and other things written up and are confident in them. We just had not really anticipated problems with supervising other people's children, mainly because, for the most part, we have not offered/allowed it. I mean, except for lesson students who come here under our sole discretion to be supervised and guided.

    I did speak with the child and parents about being a stickler for safety, as well as a few other points of "tension". I even took the time to describe in detail the accident I foresaw (and that this young lady had a luckily unharmed taste of). I guess I tend to be a pretty straightforward person... almost to the point of being blunt. I find that it works well in our business to establish rules and expectations up front, in order to kind of "nix" problems before they occur. However, it only helps in instances where a potential problem is foreseen. :/ And in some instances, such as this one, where there was no true expectation set, being blunt could be more of an insult than expectation setting, you know?

    Thanks again! I will update when I sit down with ALL of our boarders with our updated contracts and let you know how it rolls!
         
        11-06-2011, 01:34 AM
      #19
    Started
    EDIT! Sorry, just saw your post but posting this anyways!!
    I would confront the parent, preferably with the child. Say, I would like you (adressing the parent) to be out with your child whenever he\she is here. Are these horses yours? Im a little confused on whether you are meaning you are letting them come out and ride without supervision or if you are letting them ride your horses. Also it may be a good idea to tell the parent\kid that 'you need to be taking lessons with a good instructor, whether it be me or someone else, because I want you to be safe riding your horse.' If it is your horse, you need to say that they have to take lessons to be able to ride this horse because you want you and the horse to be safe. Good luck
         
        11-22-2011, 09:31 PM
      #20
    Foal
    The "tweens" at the barn where I work are very good! They clean up after their horses and themselves, never act in a bad way, always respect others, and listen and abide by all the rules...we do have the barn rules if under 18 you must be accompanied by an adult, but I mean as bad as it sounds there is some exceptions as a couple of our barn hands are under 18..and some of our boarders are 16 and drive themselves out and do their lessons or hack or whatever.
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    horses, kids, parental supervision

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