"Tweens" in the barn? - Page 3
   

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"Tweens" in the barn?

This is a discussion on "Tweens" in the barn? within the Horse Boarding forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        11-22-2011, 09:55 PM
      #21
    Foal
    Im 17, and I have my horse boarded at a stable. I drive myself, take care of my horse myself, and very rarely is their anyone out their to "watch" me. When I was 13 I was being dropped off at stables to ride alone as well. I think as long as the kid isn't stupid, knows horses and how to respect others and their animals, and the parents aren't stupid, and sign a waver it shouldn't be a big deal. I've never had problems anywhere.
         
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        11-22-2011, 10:00 PM
      #22
    Foal
    To me its not the persons age, its the persons personality and how they are that matter...all individual exceptions really.
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        11-22-2011, 10:49 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Update from my end: several parents are singing praises about their children having to earn their ride time when riding without them, as opposed to the parents paying for the supervision services. Actually, one father said that "earning" ride time is teaching his child responsibility, and makes the extra trip to our farm totally worth it.
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        11-23-2011, 09:34 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Yes, you are the BO, and you are a trainer, but you are not THEIR trainer. Your role as BO is to provide a safe place for both adults and tweens to ride. Your role as BO does NOT extend to providing instruction unless you are specifically hired to do so.

    Certainly if you witness unsafe behavior you should intervene immediately. COnsider, however, that safe practices are subjective. It almost sounds as if you frequently disagree with the way a student is practicing their riding. Whether or not you know more than they do, they are apparently not open to your input; or perhaps they don't understand your method of instructing. Either way, right now your approach is ineffective I suspect this because you are perceived as a meddling BO rather than a respected instructor. Right or wrong, perception is everything. Perhaps a more effective method would be to talk to their instructor directly about what you are witnessing, and leave it to the instructor to enforce proper riding.

    I think you need to decide ultimately what you hope to accomplish. If you want to provide a safe riding environment then work WITH the riders' instructors to make that happen and have the instructor enforce proper behaviors that should be followed through in their practice outside of lessons.

    If you want to be a BO who is permitted to dictate how all her boarders ride under the premise of "safety" then you are going to face an uphill battle all the way. Again, "safety" in horse riding is subjective. No one wants to be continuously corrected by someone who's input is unsolicited - eventually they'll tune you out completely. That said, if you want to be the "dictator" then you'll have to be a bit more clear with your clients that your "instruction" must be obeyed regardless of whether or not it is solicited or necessarily warranted.

    Ultimately if you pick and choose your battles, then when someone is doing something that poses an immediate and potentially serious threat they will be more likely to listen to your out-of-the-blue command to stop the behavior immediately. If you constantly nit pick at them, leaving them feeling like they are merely on the receiving end of your unsolicited "instruction" for the zillionth time, you will be ignored.

    Hope this perspective helps.
         
        11-23-2011, 10:10 AM
      #25
    Weanling
    Thank you for your input, catsandhorses. I'm not sure where you get the idea that I "frequently disagree with the way a student is practicing", however. The particular child was at my farm under my supervision, which I don't think you realize, considering that you make no mention of this on your response. 4x over the course of two months, I spoke to the child about her "maneuver”, one of those instances was when the parent was here and asked my assistance for her daughter, whose horse has several dangerous habits, including rearing. The last time I spoke with the daughter about the particular "unsafe"thing she was doing was because, under my supervision, she was doing things that were directly causing the horse to rear. At that point I reminded the child that while she was here without parental supervision she needed to not do that, and that, since this was the 4th time I requested she not do it, if that behavior continue, she simply would only be able to come out when the parents are here to supervise. I'm not having a child flip their horse on
    My watch.

    To be honest, other than having to remind a child to not ride their pony in the barn aisle to get outside, I let people do their thing. We have barn rules, and those are the only other things I chase a person down for, haha... Like "hey, no flip flops at the stable. You might not mind losing a toe, but I mind having to clean up the mess..." Hedge
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        11-23-2011, 10:15 AM
      #26
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillyhorses    
    Update from my end: several parents are singing praises about their children having to earn their ride time when riding without them, as opposed to the parents paying for the supervision services. Actually, one father said that "earning" ride time is teaching his child responsibility, and makes the extra trip to our farm totally worth it.
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    Sounds like a win-win situation, silly. Glad you could figure out a solution.
         
        11-23-2011, 10:27 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    Hedge was supposed to be "haha". Oops. Also, I wanted to clarify that I would only say something to the child after a near-disaster and that it was always sking her to not do the same maneuver. 2 of the 4 times I spoke up was when the maneuver caused exactly what I used as "examples"to get my point across (i.e. The horse fell while the child was riding, then the next time the horse reared...) The first time I spoke up was when I foresaw a problem (the childs parent at that point had been asking for my advice) the next time the parent asked for my direct assistance and the last two were after the child nearly had a bad accident...all because of the "maneuver".
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        11-23-2011, 10:56 AM
      #28
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillyhorses    
    Hedge was supposed to be "haha". Oops. Also, I wanted to clarify that I would only say something to the child after a near-disaster and that it was always sking her to not do the same maneuver. 2 of the 4 times I spoke up was when the maneuver caused exactly what I used as "examples"to get my point across (i.e. The horse fell while the child was riding, then the next time the horse reared...) The first time I spoke up was when I foresaw a problem (the childs parent at that point had been asking for my advice) the next time the parent asked for my direct assistance and the last two were after the child nearly had a bad accident...all because of the "maneuver".
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Thank you for the follow up explanation. I understand now that this was isolated to a single teen - apologies if I missed that in the OP! Hopefully the parents will reinforce what advice you have given. It boggles my mind how anyone could repeatedly ignore advice on something that could cause a horse to fall. Glad to hear from your update you found a solution!
         

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