APHA colt
 
 

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APHA colt

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  • When does a colt start developing a thick neck

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    11-08-2013, 09:28 PM
  #1
Yearling
APHA colt

Some of you may remember gunner. Sadly from a few personal problems he has not yet been registered. So he will be cut unless he's papered and has a phenomenal conformation and personality. Here he is now, five month old. His dam is 15.2hh and his sire is 16hh. He was a very careful colt, but now he allows me to scratch him, pet him and mess with him everywhere. He is still weary of being caught, but I don't want to rush the poor guy into being scared. I'm taking my time, letting him trust me completely and willingly.
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    11-12-2013, 10:29 PM
  #2
Yearling
Any thoughts on this young lad?
     
    11-13-2013, 09:59 AM
  #3
Yearling
He looks decently put together, and is flashy enough if you like medicine hats - but he doesn't scream stud prospect to me. He's cute, and as foals it is hard to judge what faults will completely go away with time, or what may stay. If I remember right, your other threads were debating whether to keep him whole or not? I think he'd make a neat gelding, personally, and I wouldn't bother gambling with his future. If you are still considering keeping him a stud, there is nothing wrong with waiting and feeling him out. If he isn't even weaned yet it is a bit early to judge what his personality and conformation will develop into. But the world has enough colorful stud prospects, so it wouldn't be too selfish to keep a beautiful gelding for yourself. ;)
     
    11-26-2013, 12:13 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ButtInTheDirt    
He looks decently put together, and is flashy enough if you like medicine hats - but he doesn't scream stud prospect to me. He's cute, and as foals it is hard to judge what faults will completely go away with time, or what may stay. If I remember right, your other threads were debating whether to keep him whole or not? I think he'd make a neat gelding, personally, and I wouldn't bother gambling with his future. If you are still considering keeping him a stud, there is nothing wrong with waiting and feeling him out. If he isn't even weaned yet it is a bit early to judge what his personality and conformation will develop into. But the world has enough colorful stud prospects, so it wouldn't be too selfish to keep a beautiful gelding for yourself. ;)
I'm still unsure, he will start his weaning in about two weeks. If I do cut him, he won't be cut until he's well close to two or three years old. A well known breeder around here does this with her geldings, I want to say...to let them fill out?
I really want to wait and see what he turns into before I cut him, if he turns out well no telling what I will do. The owner of his sire is very interested in me keeping him a stallion if he turns out well, she'd like to use him on a few of her show mares but I'm iffy on considering that being the reason he's intact.
All will tell with the next year to year and a half.
But I have a question for you, does keeping them intact allow their body to develop like a stud before you cut him? I can't find a way to explain what i'm meaning besides making him a stocky, 'studly' looking gelding?
     
    11-26-2013, 12:55 PM
  #5
Yearling
The younger they are cut the leaner and more feminine they appear. Allowing the extra time allows them to bulk and develop a thicker neck. The only people I know that allow a colt they know they are going geld keep his equipment until two are those that are showing halter. If I know I have a safe place to keep a colt then I'll let him keep them until between 9 months and a year. I find they have filled out adequately at that point and usually by that time it is cooler with fewer flies. Unless they are a stallion prospect it is too much of a hassle to let them keep their goods past that point. If we are mare heavy and little space to keep them apart as soon as they drop the vet is called. ETA body and mind develop and sometimes that can make a big impact on how tractable and easy to handle they are.
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    11-26-2013, 01:17 PM
  #6
Started
"Gelding a colt early in his life will result in a slower closing of the growth plates, which in turn can allow the gelded horse to grow taller."

So leaving him a stud later could potentially stunt his growth a little. He might be stockier, but he will be shorter.
     
    11-26-2013, 01:40 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel    
The younger they are cut the leaner and more feminine they appear. Allowing the extra time allows them to bulk and develop a thicker neck. The only people I know that allow a colt they know they are going geld keep his equipment until two are those that are showing halter. If I know I have a safe place to keep a colt then I'll let him keep them until between 9 months and a year. I find they have filled out adequately at that point and usually by that time it is cooler with fewer flies. Unless they are a stallion prospect it is too much of a hassle to let them keep their goods past that point. If we are mare heavy and little space to keep them apart as soon as they drop the vet is called. ETA body and mind develop and sometimes that can make a big impact on how tractable and easy to handle they are.
This isn't necessarily true. I know horses that were gelded young and sure don't look feminine. A lot of the bulk built up (thicker neck, etc) while intact can and usually does disappears after gelding...
     
    11-26-2013, 03:45 PM
  #8
Yearling
Just a small thought, my colt was extremely, and I do mean EXTREMELY knock-kneed as a foal and he grew out of it. So there are foals that grow out of conformation flaws.
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    11-26-2013, 04:12 PM
  #9
Ale
Yearling
I don't know much about conformation or things of that nature, but I think he's a beautiful little boy and the blue eye color, oh wow! Are both of his eyes blue or just one?
     
    11-26-2013, 04:21 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ale    
I don't know much about conformation or things of that nature, but I think he's a beautiful little boy and the blue eye color, oh wow! Are both of his eyes blue or just one?
Just one eye is blue
Posted via Mobile Device
     

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5months, colt, gunner, paint

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