April Rain being a (very) future momma?
   

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April Rain being a (very) future momma?

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  • April Rain mare
  • Pornbb "april rain"

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    06-15-2012, 12:34 PM
  #1
Weanling
April Rain being a (very) future momma?

Note: This idea will not follow through if I find I am not in a stable enough situation for my mare to be pregnant, and I have absolutely no intention to impulse breed. Thank you for reading. :)

This is a thought for much later down the road. I'm simply seeking general idea and opinion from my fellow horsefolk.

I have a pretty basic plan for April. After I get her around and broke to ride, I'd like to use her to compete in hunter/jumper, trail riding on the side. If she proves herself to me as she matures into a fine ol' mare with skill and experience on her back, with proof of her worth despite being unregistered, I'd like to breed her. (But only if we're successful in show jumping.) The foal will not be sold.

My questions are this:
  • What is a good age to say she's proven herself as a worthy mare for a personal foal?
  • With her being a cross, should I try to stick to the breeds that are in her lines?
  • Do most breeders truly find AI to be healthier and easier on a mare?
  • Should I do my best to stick to bigger name studs with proof and papers?
     
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    06-15-2012, 01:05 PM
  #2
Started
Well, in general it can be hard to find a certain stallion who accepts grade horses. I think if proven very well she could be bred in a few years. I would breed any earlier than 3 years old but since you want to she her it would be three to five years. It all depends on how far you are willing to go.

I would stick as close as you can to her breed and type but try to add more variety to her lines.

AI is just more safe. With breeding there's always a chance for infections with any kind of breeding but most stallions, depending on breed will just do shipping and AI.

If you are able to breed to a higher stallion then go for it.
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    06-15-2012, 01:18 PM
  #3
Started
I don't do much serious riding before 5 or 6. Then I would spend at least two years competing, proving her mind, ability and soundness. Then at 7 or 8 find the perfect stallion


I would stick to the breeds in her already myself.


Alot of people like AI. Personally I know alot of people who still prefer live cover, but that's a personal choice.


Your always better to breed the best to the best.
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    06-15-2012, 01:28 PM
  #4
Weanling
I was personally thinking closer to 10 years. Not too young or old, but mature enough to have shown me what she could do. I by no means intend to breed her before five years. Period. She's two years and untamed. Despite that, though, she shows a lot of strength and wit, so I see the potential and I like it.

Personally, I think you haven't seen squat in a horse's natural ability in the show ring until they're after four or five. Especially without long lines of hard work.
     
    06-15-2012, 01:57 PM
  #5
Started
At least the good thing about having a girl is that you don't have to play the geld-or-not-geld game, so you have plenty of time to think about it.

What does "success" mean to you, in definitive terms?

I think about the same things with my baby Lily, and I definitely want her to have a couple world championships under her belt, and a couple ROMs. But that's my definition of "success" and yours could differ.

I think you would do well to stick to complimentary breeds, but getting a stallion owner to allow you to breed a grade horse is going to be very difficult. Unless it is different in the hunter jumper world?
     
    06-15-2012, 03:30 PM
  #6
Weanling
As others have stated you may run in to people with proven stallions not wanting to breed to a grade horse. If you do find a nice proven stallion the chance of him not being tested for everything may be high...you need to have her tested. What breeds does she have in her? From the pictures on your profile she could carry frame...also has she been tested for hypp and herda?
     
    06-15-2012, 04:00 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladytaurean515    
As others have stated you may run in to people with proven stallions not wanting to breed to a grade horse. If you do find a nice proven stallion the chance of him not being tested for everything may be high...you need to have her tested. What breeds does she have in her? From the pictures on your profile she could carry frame...also has she been tested for hypp and herda?
I intend to have her fully tested as soon as she's halter broke. (The fewer times she needs sedated to see a vet, the better. And I'm in no hurry for obvious reasons.) If she tests positive for any negative things, I just won't breed her. And if I find a nice enough stallion, I'll pay a little extra to get the breeding I'm looking for.

Her sire is a Quarter x Thoroughbred (Appendix, reg. QH) and her mother is Paint Horse. I've been informed both are registered, so I suppose I could register her as a Paint which honestly, would be really nice to avoid much fuss.

I'm not super in the competitive world. Actually, to be honest, I have only shown once. Despite all of my progressive lessons, it's all my parents could afford for me as a child, but I really just want to see how far April can get us, so if we can at least place in most shows, I'll be pretty proud of us both. It'll mean she went from being extremely shy to a placer, and me being teacherless to well... a horse shower! :P

I was thinking either a strong, hunter/jumper Thoroughbred stallion or an athletic Paint. Although if I find something different that would compliment her, I may go that way.

I guess I can definitely say I'm not expecting us to go anywhere extreme - like world champ - but I'd like a few ribbons to hand from her bridle to show her to others and go, "Look, I have a worthy horse that holds potential. With your stallion, I have a chance to move further with a healthy, powerful baby to work with."
     
    06-15-2012, 04:35 PM
  #8
Weanling
You can have her tested very easily and probably cheaper doing it yourself. Pulling some hairs from her mane and sending them off. I just did it myself with a paint stallion(gelding now) I took over. I'm glad I did cause he actually came back nO for frame and I just sent off for sabino. So now I know his 2 foals from him can also be carriers. One was born on the 11th and low and behold I know she is a carrier, but I will still test her as well.
Horse Testing - Equine Genetic Testing
     
    06-15-2012, 04:41 PM
  #9
Weanling
Her mom is a hardcore tobiano, and with a very, very solid father (aka, not a speck of chrome on him at all), she came out with that much white.

If you guys want, I can get a picture posted of mommy.
     
    06-15-2012, 04:48 PM
  #10
Started
Do you know her parent's registered names then? That would make registration much easier if someone's DNA is on record.
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