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Cloning Stallions?

This is a discussion on Cloning Stallions? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        08-18-2008, 07:21 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Cloning is sooooo wrong. First of all the clone isn't the same horse. So many factors go into that horse's success. Would Man o' War have been the same horse with a different trainer or jockey? Would Theodore O' Connor have been the winner he was without his rider believing that a pony really could event at the highest level?

    Nutrition, training, and luck always play a part. There are already far too many horses in the world. Do we really need to clone more? There are thousands of horses bred every year. All of them are potential champions.

    Instead of spending thousands of dollars cloning horses that money could be put towards the care and training of all those thousands of horses bred each year.
         
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        08-19-2008, 12:53 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Well, I have to agree that I disagree with cloning.
    There's already enough horses, why do we have to clone more?


    And also I agree with Parker - there's no way I'd buy or breed to a cloned horse, regardless of bloodlines.
         
        08-19-2008, 04:50 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Seems like the vast majority of people have the same moral issue with cloning....that it is just wrong. I know this is so not politically correct, and at the risk of ruffling feathers (and having no intentions to do so) I think that humans as a whole should stop playing "Creator of Creatures" (ok...I made is as PC as I could) and let the "Creator's of Creatures" do what they do best. You have the same DNA sure, but that is just genetic make of a creature. There are a lot of other variables that makes up an animals personality, temperment, etc, etc. I just don't think that besides genetic make-up that the two animals will ever be exactly the same.

    Off the topic of cloning horses, but still on topic, has anyone heard of Booger the cloned Pit Bull???

    http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5g...lZiRAD92CE6BG0

    Cloning is still wrong no matter how you look at it.
         
        08-19-2008, 07:07 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    I don't have moral issues with cloning animals. There aren't the same ethical issues when it comes to society and interaction with others that you would get with humans, which is why I am reserved on the subject of human cloning (but approve of research into theraputic cloning of organs).

    My concern is that animals which have been artificially cloned are typically not as genetically robust as those which are the result of sexual reproduction. The cloning process has the potential to cause a lot of damage to the DNA in the various cells, and the varying environments the embryo is exposed to in its early days can lead to unpredictable effects. However, as cloning techniques improve, I become less concerned about these dangers. Different animals are more or less difficult to clone and so improvements in one species may not necessarily lead to a boost for others.

    Yes, environment and upbringing are huge factors in a horse's performance. But so are genetics - otherwise why would we be complaining about people breeding poor horses? :) Get a good genetic background (which you can do from cloning and from sexual reproduction) and add on the best life you can give a horse and it will stand a better chance of being a winner.
         
        08-19-2008, 08:15 PM
      #15
    Started
    I agree with claireauriga 100%.
    I just don't see anything morally wrong with cloning animals. :] I think of all the good that could come from this research, such as the cloning of organs. How amazing would it be if somehow one of your organs failed and you could just immediately get a new one? Without worrying about whether someone who matches up to you would be found in time. Frankly it amazes me.
         
        08-19-2008, 08:21 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    My department at my uni is working on bioreactors for growing human tissues in, so maybe I'm biased ;)

    Disregarding the competitive/money-earning aspect of cloning horses, which is probably the one driving what's going on, cloning horses does offer a lot of research potential. Mmm, research. The prospect of more knowledge about something makes me salivate.
         
        08-19-2008, 08:46 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Seems like the vast majority of people have the same moral issue with cloning....that it is just wrong. I know this is so not politically correct, and at the risk of ruffling feathers (and having no intentions to do so) I think that humans as a whole should stop playing "Creator of Creatures" (ok...I made is as PC as I could) and let the "Creator's of Creatures" do what they do best. You have the same DNA sure, but that is just genetic make of a creature. There are a lot of other variables that makes up an animals personality, temperment, etc, etc. I just don't think that besides genetic make-up that the two animals will ever be exactly the same.

    Off the topic of cloning horses, but still on topic, has anyone heard of Booger the cloned Pit Bull???
    I agree with the Creator of Creatures. I have heard of Booger the cloned pit bull. Apparently it saved her life and she paid like $50k to have 5 clones made of him.

    Cloning animals and humans is wrong. We're just trying to change what's already there. Before we know it we'll be trying to breed strange combinations of animals or try to make humans that are expert at something? Like let's say a country wants a thousand people for an army. So they create a thousand highly fit, perfectly trained, merciless people. Is that right?

    For those of you who think only bacteria, plants, or organs what says that they will stop at that? As long as cloning is allowed everyone will try to push the limits.

    Not trying to ruffle any feathers here. Just saying what I think.
         
        08-20-2008, 07:06 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    My feathers aren't ruffled, but I do think people with those kind of exaggerated fears are missing several important points. You can't clone an army of soldiers - a cloned creature takes just as long as a sexually reproduced one to grow up, a cloned human would be just as capable of thought and emotion as any other, and artificial cloning is highly expensive and risky, ergo pointless for mass production of humans when we have tried and tested methods already. If you wanted to grow an army, pay lots of people to have sex ...

    Beware slippery slopes! We have ethics committees for a reason :) By turning it into 'oh no what will THEY do' you're forgetting the fact that people like - well, me! - are part of 'them'. Admittedly I'd only be on the periphary, but I might get involved in the tissue bioreactor project in a couple of years if I can. The people doing this research are sensible, ordinary people who want to understand more about the way organisms work so that they can make improvements in medicine to save and improve lives :)

    Basically, I'm trying to assuage some of your fears about cloning. I'm not an expert, but I don't think cloning is inherently evil or anything like that. All you're doing is creating one creature with largely the same DNA as another - doesn't mean it'll be the same creature. I think we should be wary of cloning where it may impact on human lives - e.g. When using cloned animals in food, which is increasingly in demand, you need to be sure that the cloning process hasn't introduced anything dangerous into the meat - or where it can cause damage to an established industry, e.g. Cloning animals for use in racing.

    What objections, other than a dislike of the cloning process, do you guys have? I can foresee problems when it comes to people trying to manipulate the DNA of their horses to earn more money, but then I can also argue that this is a mere extension of the genetic manipulation we already have going on when we breed ...
         
        08-20-2008, 05:05 PM
      #19
    Foal
    I agree with what claireauriga said. I also see absolutly nothing moraly wrong with cloning, and the possible benefits far outweight any negatives. I must admit I'm a little confused as to why people don't like it or think cloning as wrong. Is it some sort of religious thing? (sorry if that is offesnsive, I don't really know any religious people and I don't mean to offend, I'm just curious.)
         

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