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Filly born without eyes?

This is a discussion on Filly born without eyes? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        04-23-2013, 04:41 PM
      #31
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    Try to sell this horse in the future.

    Uh what??




    Anyways as for the head cocking deal it doesn't seem too out of the norm IMO.

    We have a 1/2 blind horse at the ranch and he holds his head the same in order to see sometimes

    Like I said before, if the vet checks out I would say go for it.

    Training a blind horse does not have to be "extremely difficult". And having been blind from birth itay be easier for her down the line.
    That is if she does turn out healthy.
         
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        04-23-2013, 05:30 PM
      #32
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineBovine    
    Mean as it may sound, I would have had it put down as soon as it hit the ground. Get a vet check but whatever you choose it's going to be bloody difficult. I don't want to even think of the difficulties you're going to have training her :( best of luck
    We would have, too. We did not own her when she was born. She is now almost a week 1/2. So now we don't know exactly what to do.

    It will be hard to place a horse like this if we get her into her adult years. I am worried about the quality of life she will have if in the event we can no longer care for her.

    A 30 year plan would be hard to come up with as I don't know if we could keep her that long. =[ We would have to a build a stall specialized for her and she would need special handling... I don't see this going the way I wished it would.
         
        04-23-2013, 05:39 PM
      #33
    Super Moderator
    Sometimes the hardest thing is the right thing
    So many unwanted healthy horses out there needing homes and can't find them - placing this one long term is going to be tough and once she leaves you no guarantee of where she ends up and what she gets put through.
         
        04-23-2013, 08:55 PM
      #34
    Super Moderator
    Just to add, when it becomes time for my next horse, I plan to actively seek out one that is vision impaired. They ARE hard to place (and, to be honest, I would not have brought my mare home if I known about her sight issues) but please don't assume no one will want her in later years. I'm 100% sure I'm not the only one with a heart for blind horses.

    If I could, I would offer to take her now. But I'm a college student and 2 horses is not a financially responsible decision for me. One horse is barely possible and certainly not "responsible"!


    Anyway, really, it just KILLS me that so many people seem so willing to put this horse down just based on her sightlessness. Yes, she's going to be hard to place but blindness is not a mental defect, it's just a physical one. If she vet-checks fine for everything else, she could go on to be the next something amazing in the horse world.
    And she's a baby! My mare was 27 when her blindness really took hold and that's been the most hard part. Lacey knows how things should be and therefore sometimes has a hard time trusting me over her internal horsey-instinct. Since this filly was born bind/nearly blind, she literally could do ANYTHING. She doesn't know anything but being blind. She won't know anything about trusting her own instinct, it will all be the instinct of the person she's bonded with (that is, if she's brought up to trust humans implicitly, but it sounds like you, OP, have that part handled! :) ).
    She could literally do anything. We know she's blind, she just knows she's who she is.

    That's just my $.02
         
        04-23-2013, 09:01 PM
      #35
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallaby    
    Just to add, when it becomes time for my next horse, I plan to actively seek out one that is vision impaired. They ARE hard to place (and, to be honest, I would not have brought my mare home if I known about her sight issues) but please don't assume no one will want her in later years. I'm 100% sure I'm not the only one with a heart for blind horses.

    If I could, I would offer to take her now. But I'm a college student and 2 horses is not a financially responsible decision for me. One horse is barely possible and certainly not "responsible"!


    Anyway, really, it just KILLS me that so many people seem so willing to put this horse down just based on her sightlessness. Yes, she's going to be hard to place but blindness is not a mental defect, it's just a physical one. If she vet-checks fine for everything else, she could go on to be the next something amazing in the horse world.
    And she's a baby! My mare was 27 when her blindness really took hold and that's been the most hard part. Lacey knows how things should be and therefore sometimes has a hard time trusting me over her internal horsey-instinct. Since this filly was born bind/nearly blind, she literally could do ANYTHING. She doesn't know anything but being blind. She won't know anything about trusting her own instinct, it will all be the instinct of the person she's bonded with (that is, if she's brought up to trust humans implicitly, but it sounds like you, OP, have that part handled! :) ).
    She could literally do anything. We know she's blind, she just knows she's who she is.

    That's just my $.02
    Excellent made point, but the problem that I am having is not just her lack of sight. I am also worried that since she didn't fully develop eyes and mom was emaciated throughout the pregnancy, what else didn't develop correctly? How do we know there aren't mental defects? What if her insides aren't developed and she is constantly sick?

    We have to think about her well being as well as our financial situation.
         
        04-23-2013, 09:13 PM
      #36
    Yearling
    Have you called the vet to see when they can come out to do an exam? Until then you just have to wait. Then I would ask the vet. Also, I would start training now, and talking lots to her so she knows your voice. That will help since she isn't even two weeks now. We had a filly with only one eye, she was a great horse. She died at age 12 from a heart attack. Due to a heart condition. So yes, more than likely something else is underdeveloped.
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        04-23-2013, 09:28 PM
      #37
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AndersonEquestrian    
    Excellent made point, but the problem that I am having is not just her lack of sight. I am also worried that since she didn't fully develop eyes and mom was emaciated throughout the pregnancy, what else didn't develop correctly? How do we know there aren't mental defects? What if her insides aren't developed and she is constantly sick?

    We have to think about her well being as well as our financial situation.
    I think the possibility of mental/internal issues are something to be dealt with down the road - as in, if the vet can't find anything wrong now (if there's something significantly wrong with her per the vet - brain damage or that eye is a significant issue beyond just being blind, etc, I'm in the "put her down" camp - she doesn't need significant suffering), please don't make a decision based on "what-ifs."

    She may be perfectly healthy, mentally and physically (besides the eyes). She could also have some significant problems, in which case I would probably join the "put her down" people. But I just hope you'll give her a chance.

    And immune issues CAN be handled somewhat effectively. My mare has ERU which is an auto-immune disease like any human auto-immune disease: she's likely to get sick more, she can get fungal infections more quickly, etc. However, all those issues are easily managed. She doesn't get vaccinated every year, I try to keep hr at home and away from other horses as much as possible (she lives with a pair of goats), and I fed her natural immune boosting "stuff." She hasn't been sick in over a year since I implemented these plans and her immune system is literally junk.
    The other thing is that she lives a really happy life. She is thriving in her environment and it's something I thought I would never see. She's not depressed because she can't see, she doesn't mope around because she's not around horses (she's actually more relaxed away from other horses!), she loves to be ridden, and so on.
    I almost had her directly put down after her diagnoses, because I thought we would never be able to handle it, and boy I'm glad I decided to give her more time. I thought that this disease would get the best of us but in fact, we're getting the best of this disease.



    I know you want to do the best thing for this filly and that's really commendable. Just please don't make a decision based on "what-ifs" or possibilities. :)
    BrieannaKelly likes this.
         
        04-23-2013, 09:44 PM
      #38
    Weanling
    Right, I totally agree and we don't want to put her down. We want to get her to live but the reality is that is may not happen =[
         
        04-23-2013, 10:14 PM
      #39
    Showing
    You know what I refuse to think that that filly is blind. The behaviors sound like she sees. I would get a vet to check on that eye to see if she can see, if she can-keep her! There thousands of horses out there who function normally with 1 eye. She is lucky, because she will have never known any different.
         
        04-23-2013, 11:44 PM
      #40
    Yearling
    I rode a a horse once that had vision in both eyes, then one day became blind in one eye... he was 23... he coped with it pretty good, but one day I got a call from the owner saying that he had died... it was from a heart attack they think... they found him tangled up in barbed wire, and when he was trying to get up, they figure he scared himself enough to kill himself... So if you do decide to keep her alive, MAKE SURE she is not in barbed wire, electric wire, or even poor made wooden fences... as she could do the same... or could harm herself in a different way.
         

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