Filly or Colt?
 
 

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Filly or Colt?

This is a discussion on Filly or Colt? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • What easier to train a colt or filly
  • Is a mare pregnant longer with a colt or with a filly

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    02-16-2013, 06:26 PM
  #1
Weanling
Filly or Colt?

Hi All

After reading a lot of posts (on various forums), I've noticed there's a trend towards keeping a filly and selling on a colt.

Is there a reason for this? Or is this just a personal preference?

Are fillies easier to handle and train or is it the gelding cost that's a factor or are fillies kept for breeding?

Sorry if it seems a silly question, but i've noticed this more and more and really don't understand why.

Cheers
     
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    02-16-2013, 06:35 PM
  #2
Trained
Its not a silly question.
As a breeder I am interested in potential broodmares so a filly is what I would rather have. Since I already have a stallion I have no need for another. All the colts are for sale the day they hit the ground.
The fillies I will keep to see what potential they have before making that decision. Shalom
     
    02-16-2013, 06:39 PM
  #3
Weanling
Thankyou. My mare is pregnant (any day now - or so I keep telling myself lol) and after seeing the preference to fillies, I started to wonder if there was something I wasn't aware of about colts haha xx
     
    02-16-2013, 06:44 PM
  #4
Trained
A good horse is whatever colour and sex it is born with.
If you are not interested in breeding then a gelding is not going to be a problem. Might even be easier to sell in the future.
Good luck with the foal. Shalom
Corporal likes this.
     
    02-16-2013, 07:07 PM
  #5
Foal
I am a breeder and we have the same policy. All colts are immediately for sale, and fillies are usually for sale unless she has good broodmare potential. Another possibility is the higher demand for geldings, so they're easier to sell faster. Our trainer has told us that geldings are more popular with his clients at least, so he's always happy when we come up with a colt. Colts also have to be gelded and it's easier as an owner if you don't have to mess with that. Over all though, there's no reason why colts are less than fillies, it all boils down to personal preference. :)
     
    02-16-2013, 07:36 PM
  #6
Trained
That's how I got my horse! I was working at a breeding farm, riding & showing their stallion. My mare was bred to their Paint stallion and they had lots of mares bred to him as well. They had one big beautiful mare I had my eye on. She was out of a sport horse I was in love with, and here I had a quarter horse mare. Well the big mare had a solid colt and my mare had a loud colored filly. I asked the owner if they would trade, YES and they covered the colt's gelding costs as well. The loud colored filly was sold before she was even weaned, the few other colts they had did not sell as quickly, some were yearlings.
Corporal likes this.
     
    02-16-2013, 07:53 PM
  #7
Yearling
Not being a breeder, but looking at it from that kind of perspective I can see why not a lot of people would keep a colt. Though I would probably have more than one stallion if I kept only dropped fillies...I'm not into extremely close inbreeding, though breeding to outside stallions could also be an option in that kind of situation.

Personally I gravitate towards males of any species. I just get along with them more. Dogs, cats, horses, even birds and reptiles. That may just be me, but I've heard that it's fairly common for a person of one gender to be more inclined to get along with an animal of the opposite gender.
     
    02-16-2013, 08:06 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckyroo    
Hi All

After reading a lot of posts (on various forums), I've noticed there's a trend towards keeping a filly and selling on a colt.

Is there a reason for this? Or is this just a personal preference?

Are fillies easier to handle and train or is it the gelding cost that's a factor or are fillies kept for breeding?

Sorry if it seems a silly question, but i've noticed this more and more and really don't understand why.

Cheers
It all comes down to personal preference and what the initial reason for breeding was.
ParaIndy likes this.
     
    02-16-2013, 08:29 PM
  #9
Yearling
Having a rare breed I was worried that I might end up with a quality colt that would be hard to part with and I definitely don't have the facility for a stallion. With a filly I would have no problem with training, she wouldn't get my other horses pregnant, and down the road I could still use her as a broodmare. I definitely got an exceptional filly this round, but I think if I would have got a colt half as gorgeous as her I wouldn't have been nearly as excited.

I do not breed, but I have mostly mares, and my only gelding is the cheekiest thing on four legs, and definitely does not keep up with the standards of his fellow geldings.
     
    02-16-2013, 08:36 PM
  #10
Foal
Gonna end up restating the obvious here but fillies are good for seeing if they have any breeding potential, any breeding farm typically has their own stallion so they don't need another one (unless their stallion's going to need to be replaced at some point in the near future I guess).

Another reason selling colts may be popular is you can gelding them. At least 90% of the people I know/ride with would rather ride a gelding than ride a mare. I happen to have a mare and I LOVE her. She's absolutely more of a challenge than any gelding I've ever sat on but that's something I enjoy when I ride.
     

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