Foaling Q's - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeding

Foaling Q's

This is a discussion on Foaling Q's within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Horse breeding tie placenta
  • Foaling Q's

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-30-2010, 03:02 PM
  #11
Started
If you know how to "read" a placenta, then it's ok not to save it for the vet, but for those who don't know, then it's best to keep it until the vet check. And if one lives in an area where there are wild creatures about, best to keep it in a closed bucket.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-31-2010, 08:26 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet    
If you know how to "read" a placenta, then it's ok not to save it for the vet, but for those who don't know, then it's best to keep it until the vet check. And if one lives in an area where there are wild creatures about, best to keep it in a closed bucket.
I actually can tell if a placenta is complete or not, however since I am not familiar with how this mare foals out I probably will keep it for the vet just to be certain.

Just as an update - no real changes She's still the same, udder may be a bit fuller but other than that nothing else. I'm guessing I still have a wait, but keeping a close eye on her to be sure. Nothing to make me start keeping her in the stall or camping out in the barn yet :)
     
    01-31-2010, 10:53 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Oh, forgot to mention, I finally got to speak to my vet yesterday. He said he didn't need to do an ultrasound to check for twins because he would have noticed if there were twins when he did her palpitation in December. He did say, however, if I am very concerned he can arrange to do an ultrasound in the upcoming week to try to confirm gestational age, he stated again he didn't think it was necessary, but that he could do it. I am going by his office when they open tomorrow to get the milk test strips, and I probably will go ahead and schedule an ultrasound appt tomorrow. (couldn't schedule it yesterday, he returned my call after office hours)
     
    01-31-2010, 02:07 PM
  #14
Yearling
Indy- no twins are not at all common. In fact most mares resolve twins or abort by 7 months. All the same we had two sets of twins in our tiny mountain town in the same year, both surprises as no vetting was done on either mare. Biggest surprise was that both sets and dams lived and did well.

Feathered feet- out of curiosity, what is the oxytocin for? I ask because I have seen people give it while the foal is still being delivered and it has caused massive uterine tears. We have always lost the mare and foal in these trainwreck situations. Not at all saying you would use it incorrectly, but for other readers, just making sure they know that you do not give it while the foal is still being delivered.

I am with Kevin on leaving a watched pot. Most mares do best with little disturbance, even though owners think their presence calms the mare, this is not usually the case (I know some people will disagree, but in the vast majority of deliveries, mares do better on their own). And mares are not at all like cows, you do not want to get your arms in there/pull unless you are a trained professional ie. DVM.
     
    01-31-2010, 02:30 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Tealamutt ~ oh believe me I'm completely with you there, I have no interest in being invasive. While I'd like to be there in case of emergency, I'm not vain enough to think my mare needs me to feel comfortable with something she has doubtlessly done on her own many times before. I don't think we are at the 'birth is imminent' point anyways, I think she may be closer than I had originally counted on and I just want to be prepared.

I did get word back from the breeder just an hour ago(finally!) who confirmed absolutely last years colt was born April Fools Day with no chance for record mix ups. So, based on that, the soonest Freyja could have been bred was on her foal heat 9 or 10 days after that. She didn't have record of the length of Freyja's pregnancy, but did mention that she remembers her bagging up early. She says she didn't notice her tail muscles relaxing early, but then she didn't check . I'm inclined to think at this point we might still be heading for the original due date period, and she just shows a few signs early. Or she might be one that has a slightly shorter gestation, like others have mentioned. Maybe she's carrying a filly this time around, they don't cook as long, right?
     
    01-31-2010, 03:05 PM
  #16
Yearling
Mares are so hard to tell!! We have an arabian herd of broodmares and they all like to fool us from time to time. One poor girl was bagged up and tail flopping 6 weeks before she let go of her foal- and in 90 degree weather, the poor thing. Fillies can be shorter to cook, but usually by days, not weeks.

It sounds like you're ready, the only think I'd want is to rule out twins, because you're going to want to go for c-section or at least having a vet on hand incase of tears (twins get all tangled up and the mare keeps pushing and you can get uterine or vaginal tears). You can do that with transabdominal (vs transrectal) at this point. I'd go for that since you said the vet isn't totally experienced with repro, I don't trust him to have felt the twins back in nov/dec. Other than that, wait it out, try to be patient, expect her to drop the second you turn your back or run to town for groceries. This part is both my most favorite and hated part of foaling season. Anticipation!! Good luck!
     
    01-31-2010, 03:51 PM
  #17
Started
Tealamutt asked..

Quote:
Feathered feet- out of curiosity, what is the oxytocin for?
Retention of the placenta is very common post-foaling in Draft (heavy) horse breeds. They also seem more likely to develop laminitis if expulsion of the placenta is delayed. Oxytocin after foaling is an effective way of inducing placental expulsion. Many Draft horse owners, tie a damp towel to the hanging placenta if it has not come away pretty quickly after foaling. If that doesn't work, then Oxytocin is given. Obviously preferably given by a vet but if a vet is not available for whatever reason, then a knowledgeable breeder can give it.
My daughter, who owns all our horses, has never had a problem yet with a retained placenta and her vet is always close by, but in an emergency, she would probably have to give Oxy.
The list I showed here, was put together by members of my forum. Obviously few would have all the items on hand and it was purely a list of possible items one would/should have on hand during foaling season.
We personally never bother a mare while foaling and wouldn't become involved unless there was an obvious problem. We do bring them in to the foaling stall though, a few weeks before their due date. It has an outside area with 6' stallion fencing, since we have wild animals about.
We don't like to leave our horses out in the paddocks to foal if at all possible. Nobody wants to search around for a placenta in the dark, if a mare foals at night, or have to help a mare if needed during foaling, far away from the barn.
The mares are shut in the foaling stall at night with a camera to be watched from the house.
My daughter doesn't allow all and sundry to come in and watch births. We really like to leave mares alone to get on with it quietly. Most usually, my daughter is the only one in attendance if needed and not in the stall with the mare. Last year however, she did allow my eldest granddaughter to view her first equine birth.
     
    01-31-2010, 07:09 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet    
tealamutt asked..



Retention of the placenta is very common post-foaling in Draft (heavy) horse breeds. They also seem more likely to develop laminitis if expulsion of the placenta is delayed. Oxytocin after foaling is an effective way of inducing placental expulsion. Many Draft horse owners, tie a damp towel to the hanging placenta if it has not come away pretty quickly after foaling. If that doesn't work, then Oxytocin is given. Obviously preferably given by a vet but if a vet is not available for whatever reason, then a knowledgeable breeder can give it.
My daughter, who owns all our horses, has never had a problem yet with a retained placenta and her vet is always close by, but in an emergency, she would probably have to give Oxy.
The list I showed here, was put together by members of my forum. Obviously few would have all the items on hand and it was purely a list of possible items one would/should have on hand during foaling season.
We personally never bother a mare while foaling and wouldn't become involved unless there was an obvious problem. We do bring them in to the foaling stall though, a few weeks before their due date. It has an outside area with 6' stallion fencing, since we have wild animals about.
We don't like to leave our horses out in the paddocks to foal if at all possible. Nobody wants to search around for a placenta in the dark, if a mare foals at night, or have to help a mare if needed during foaling, far away from the barn.
The mares are shut in the foaling stall at night with a camera to be watched from the house.
My daughter doesn't allow all and sundry to come in and watch births. We really like to leave mares alone to get on with it quietly. Most usually, my daughter is the only one in attendance if needed and not in the stall with the mare. Last year however, she did allow my eldest granddaughter to view her first equine birth.
Okay, interesting. I didn't know draft crosses were more inclined to retain a placenta. I actually DO keep oxy in the house, for my dogs, my foundation bitch had an enormous litter the last time around and the vet advised it, although in the end I never used it, for my dogs a dose of calcium usually does the trick to supplement contractions.

Many of the things on your list I actually have on hand standard at any rate, again for whelping puppies. There are a few specific items I don't (such as an ob shoulder glove, a colostrometer, and the vitaflex foal response). I have Probios, assuming it's the same thing I give my goats? That's the name brand, anyways, it's just probiotic bacteria? And I have suture wire instead of fishing line. Will the colostrometer be necessary when this is not a maiden mare? She was definitely an over-producer with her last colt.

Tealamutt ~ yes I am going to go ahead and have the vet do the ultrasound, I'll be calling for that tomorrow. I unfortunately do not have cameras in the barn (wish I did!) I've been getting up and checking Freyja at night, but only once during the night as so far I really don't think it's going to be that soon. I expect she'll wait until I'm not around, no matter what I do anyways. Goodness me I'm glad I won't have to go through this again! Dogs are so nice and predictable with giving birth, you just take their temp and it doesn't lie

I probably wouldn't dose the mare myself at any rate, but out of curiousity how would I calculate dosage?

You know, that's what I love about this forum. I learn new things all the time.
     
    01-31-2010, 08:30 PM
  #19
Started
There are things on that list we've never had either. I bred and showed dogs almost all my life and like you, usually had Oxy on hand. Never had to use it on a horse though.
What kind of dogs do you have? I had a few breeds along the way but mostly kept Great Danes, Dandie Dinmonts and Brussels Griffons.
     
    01-31-2010, 10:21 PM
  #20
Yearling
Excellent post feathered feet. Extremely knowledgeable and valuable info! I know I said it before, but just to be clear, I wasn't trying to step on your toes at all- just wanting to make sure no one would think it could help with delivery. (people get kind of touchy on this forum from time to time, didn't want to start a battle!)
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Foaling alarms anders66 Horse Breeding 0 01-29-2010 11:21 AM
After foaling...when can you ride? Plains Drifter Horse Training 8 01-10-2010 08:21 PM
Shod before foaling? deineria Horse Health 4 10-11-2009 02:11 PM
Foaling Preparation whinruss Horse Breeding 10 04-14-2008 12:11 AM
Many questions about foaling AlmostFamous Horse Breeding 1 02-17-2008 08:22 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0