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Foaling Q's

This is a discussion on Foaling Q's within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        02-01-2010, 04:45 PM
      #31
    Green Broke
    Started out as a groomer at 17 years old. Then got drafted from groomer to surgical aide at the vet clinic I worked for, and did that most my adult life. Had to quit working just before my son was born (was put on bedrest) and just groomed out of my house since he was born so I could set up my own hours around his therapy appts etc. Doesn't work as well now that I have moved so far out in the country though. Since he has started kindergarten this year I'll probably go back to the daily grind soon enough. Thought about doing a tech certification program, since I had been doing all the work anyways as an aide, just not getting the same job title or pay *l* I agree with you - wire coats are the way to go if you want to avoid shedding! I swear there is some kind of link to wire coats and good temperaments - I've seen it across so many breeds!

    The school situation is a mess everywhere, I think. My mother just retired early, last year from teaching her whole life in San Diego because she couldn't handle it anymore. I drive 30 miles one way to take my son to a charter school in town, because I've had endless nonsense from the districts.


    I saw pictures of your Halcyon on the color chart thread. She is stunning!
         
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        02-01-2010, 05:06 PM
      #32
    Started
    Well I just heard that my daughter's teaching job, will end in March! What a disgrace California is. Your Mum will know all about that no doubt.
    The state is completely broke. I'm on SS and it's been cut twice in the last couple of months. Cut my dental completely now. I get a meagre $100 per month from England - so the SS here cut $100 out of my check!
    Our schools are falling down but we must educate thousands - maybe hundreds of thousands, of children of illegal aliens here. Crime is dreadful and now, because our jails are full, they are going to let thousands of criminal out of jail, to make room for more. What are they thinking? It beats me. I could go on but won't. Makes me too furious.
    My daughter is sad about her job, since she taught kids with disabilities, but she has a wonderful grooming set up at her ranch, so will be able to carry on. However, she will have to sell at least one and probably two, of her lovely mares. She'll keep Halcy no doubt and hopefully her beautiful stallion. Living in California gets more difficult daily though.
    At least my hubby has his medical paid for (so far). He's had 13 heart surgeries and if he didn't, we'd be living in one of those tent cities which have popped up all over the place here.
    I guess we are lucky to have a roof over our heads and can hope that something changes in the future.
         
        02-01-2010, 06:20 PM
      #33
    Green Broke
    Feathered feet ~ frankly I don't know how she can afford to keep horses in CA. After my divorce moving back there was something my whole family was prompting me to do (all my family is in San Diego) but with the cost of horse properties, not to mention how outrageous hay is out there, it wasn't an option for me. Out here, I filled both lofts in my enormous barn to the brim with very good quality hay - enough to last me through the whole year, even with all the big mouths eating it - for $1500 bucks. I could move to CA and be a non horse person, or stay in a part of the country I don't love but have built up a tolerance for, but be able to live the farm life I wanted. In the end an easy choice.

    So you're from England originally? What part? My fiance is moving here from Kent. Once his visa clears. That has been an ordeal in itself. He stays here for three months, but then has to go back for two, until everything is in place. Been doing this for a year. I don't love that he had to go back in the middle of winter and leave hauling buckets of water to the barn in a foot of snow to me!!

    I guess we've totally hijacked this thread, but since I created it an I don't mind, I suppose it's okay? *lol*
         
        02-01-2010, 09:51 PM
      #34
    Started
    In this market, most horse breeders can hardly break even, raising and selling a foal, but those in California, can hardly afford to breed at all. My daughter didn't breed any of her mares last year. Halcyon came to her bred and the foal will go back to the stud owner. Don't know if she'll breed this year. Her feed bill alone is enormous, just feeding six horses. And of course, everything else is more expensive too.
    We are very worried in the Gypsy Horse breed, that breeding will eventually end up only in the hands of a very few who can afford to keep breeding - whether they know what they are doing or not.
    Tell your fiance that I'd very gladly change places with him. I'm still very homesick for England, even after all these years. I have several friends who still live in Kent. Most of my family who are left, live in Wales. Funnily enough, they seem to think because I'm living in California, I must be doing extremely well. I guess they've watched too many movies.
         
        02-03-2010, 07:54 AM
      #35
    Started
    Off topic, but I'd love to see pics of your collies :) I love the herding breeds (my choice is Aussies) :)
    Oh and I was also a groomer, did that for 6 years :)
         
        02-03-2010, 08:22 AM
      #36
    Green Broke
    CheyAut ~ I posted a couple pics of them on this thread: http://www.horseforum.com/farm/lets-...rm-dogs-41832/

    I love aussies too, I have one, he's 14 now but was my first herding dog. I never did stock work with him, but he was wonderful in obedience and agility. The herding trainer I take my dogs to works primarily with aussies. I had to search long and hard to find a trainer that didn't specialize in border collies, since rough collies herd differently then border collies do, and need a different approach to training. My dogs herd much like aussies - they are very upright, loose eyed working dogs, they don't stare 'em down like the BCs.

    Update on Freyja - her bag has filled back in as of this morning, but really little else has changed. She seems very uncomfortable, but not the pre-labor kind of uncomfortable, just the I'm huge kind of uncomfortable. We'll know more after her ultrasound tomorrow!
         
        02-03-2010, 10:38 PM
      #37
    Yearling
    Indy- dying to know what the vet says, please update tomorrow (I'm sure you're planning on it anyway!) I'm so nuts about babies (any kind but human), I'm living vicariously through you!
         
        02-03-2010, 10:48 PM
      #38
    Green Broke
    Tealamutt ~ I'll keep updating this thread as things go along. I checked Freyja about 15 minutes ago. She was laying down, but just sleeping. Her bag had filled back in today, but it's still just yellow fluid, no milk. It's full but soft. I have my milk test strips for when her milk comes in, but not in a hurry to use them at this point. I got word from the breeder the other day, she mentioned she did remember her bagging up early last year with Finn. I'm keeping her tail braided (well, what passes for braided for me. There's a reason I'm not posting pictures, ya'll would laugh at my tail braid ) and her stall immaculate, everything is set and ready (well, some of it's in a bag in my laundry room - liquids would freeze solid out there right now) I have put a couple space heaters out there, and a heat lamp in her stall, but not running any of it until the time comes. I've been checking her before I go to bed, but not really getting up at night to check her at this point, she's just not seeming that close. The tail and back end being so loose throws me off, but she's pretty much normal, not off her feed or anything. The vet comes tomorrow at 9 for the ultrasound, so hopefully I'll have more to tell you tomorrow!
         
        02-03-2010, 11:07 PM
      #39
    Yearling
    Boo to no pics, who cares about your braiding skills. Preggo mommy, that's what I want to see. And of course the bundle of joy when she does arrive. Here's something fun you can enjoy tomorrow- when the vet starts the U/S, the foal will start moving all around. It isn't dangerous at all for them, but for some reason, late term foals almost all "dance" when you start imaging them. I love palpating late mares, the babies love to kick and it is a pretty amazing thing to feel. I am green with envy right now, can you tell? Trapped in class all day and no chance to go out to the herd to help check on "my" girls!
         
        02-04-2010, 12:23 AM
      #40
    Started
    Very sad news. My daughter's mare Halcyon, must have lost her baby along the way. Vet says no baby.
         

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