Foals get the mares temperament
 
 

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Foals get the mares temperament

This is a discussion on Foals get the mares temperament within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Sire foal temperament
  • How to get mares temperment in foal

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    08-05-2014, 05:32 PM
  #1
Started
Foals get the mares temperament

I hear a lot of people talk about breeding mares with "behavioral issues" in the hopes that the resulting foal will calm the mare down. I had to give this example as supporting evidence that the foal takes the mares temperament. We weaned our mare and foal over the weekend. In preparation for this even we put an older (mid teens) mare who is very gentle out with the mare and foal. The foal took to this older mare like it was her second mother. Trying to nurse off the mare (gently being rebuffed from such behaviors) and generally following it around. The weaning went well, no crying no pacing just hanging out with the second mare. The mother was "alpha" of the the little group. It took the foal about 12 hours to feel comfortable in her "alpha" role. She has so far pushed the older mare off her grain, and finds the crown of leader to fit her well. Its sort of funny to watch this weanling push a full grown horse around on the other hand, it makes me feel I have to be extra vigilant about enforcing horse/human interaction rules.
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    08-05-2014, 05:42 PM
  #2
Started
I'm finding the same thing with my filly. Her dam is the dominant mare and has a very dominating personality. My filly also displays this towards our other mare, trying to chase her from feed, nipping, etc. So far, with a few reminders, she is extremely agreeable towards me and other people, but she is learning herd behaviour from her mom.
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    08-05-2014, 06:35 PM
  #3
Started
Yeah the foal has been wonderful with humans, except for a few "learning opportunities". I am glad that her mother was always very sweet with humans as well because if she was a dominant with humans as she is with other horses we would be in for a rough road.
     
    08-05-2014, 06:52 PM
  #4
Trained
I agree that foals certainly learn behaviors from their mothers, but at our place all of our mares always let foals and even yearlings share their feed, even boss mare. Perhaps we just have a bunch of very maternal mares.
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    08-05-2014, 08:52 PM
  #5
Started
No, this mare has a history of allowing others to share her food. The baby actually pushed her away from the food. The weanling pins her ears and the mare backs off. What is interesting is that this mare had a foal of her own a number of years ago. That foal was/is the most mild/submissive horse I have ever met. That is a horse that even as a 15 year old wants to share food and would never even think of lifting a foot to defend herself. I always though it was just the foal but maybe its mamma.
     
    08-05-2014, 08:55 PM
  #6
Yearling
I find the opposite in mine! My mare is the dominant mare! My colt doesn't care about pecking order! Though he does have the antisocial "I don't particularly like you but...I'l deal with you" attitude and willing like her.
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    08-06-2014, 01:29 AM
  #7
Yearling
My favorite mare had 4 colts (later gelded) and only #4 is her clone temperament wise. Colt #1 is the least like her, #2 (sold him to friend when he was 5) & #3 have the same personalities but not exactly like their mom. Only colts 3 & 4 had the same sire.

Kudos to anyone that understands what I just said. LOL
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    08-06-2014, 10:12 AM
  #8
Foal
My Mare can be pretty nasty when it comes to feed time, she is the dominant in the pasture. But her colt is the complete opposite. I actually do get a little worried with the antics that happen during feeding time. I've tried splitting certain horses into separate pastures just to be fed but it doesn't seem to matter, which ever horses are together have issues. I have two pushy mares when it comes to feed, the first is my colts dam and the other is my sisters quarter horse. I'm worried that either the colt will get injured or my older Palomino mare will be. Any suggestions?
     
    08-06-2014, 10:17 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by BowmanFarms    
My Mare can be pretty nasty when it comes to feed time, she is the dominant in the pasture. But her colt is the complete opposite. I actually do get a little worried with the antics that happen during feeding time. I've tried splitting certain horses into separate pastures just to be fed but it doesn't seem to matter, which ever horses are together have issues. I have two pushy mares when it comes to feed, the first is my colts dam and the other is my sisters quarter horse. I'm worried that either the colt will get injured or my older Palomino mare will be. Any suggestions?
Have you tried separating the 2 you are worried about and feeding those 2 by themselves?
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    08-06-2014, 11:53 AM
  #10
Yearling
My barn owner and I were just having this conversation the other day. She breeds Appaloosas. She said that she's noticed the babies take after their mom's. They learn their stall behavior from them (If the mare's messy, baby will be messy, etc) and their pecking order from them. For example, if you wean a bunch of babies, the lead baby will probably be the foal from the lead mare. At least that's her experience. I've never bred so have none, but I do see similarities from some of her younger horses and their dams on property. Got a fruit loop of a 2 year old filly that's so similar to her Dam its not even funny.
     

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