Gelding a colt - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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Gelding a colt

Hi all! I thought the thread on weaning was a good one, and I have a similar question. When should I geld my colt?

He was born July 14th. The vet suggested 5-6 months. But here is the problem. 5-6 months will put it into the winter, and we usually have snow and mud. December probably wouldn't be too terribly cold, but I worry about mud getting into is incisions. Should I try to do it earlier, say October or early November? If I wait until after the snow and mud season, it may not dry out good around here until April or May, and by then he will be nearly a yearling. I would rather have it done sooner than that as he is my first foal and I don't want to have to deal with studdy behavior. He's enough of a challenge as it is.

So what do you suggest? For what it's worth, I *think* he has both testicles down now. There is one for sure, and I am fairly sure I can see/feel the other one just slightly higher. If they are down now, will they stay down? Or can they go back up at some point?
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post #2 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:00 PM
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It's something to discuss with your vet, but as I understand it, cold is better for gelding.
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post #3 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:01 PM
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If both are down then you can geld. Get the vet to check if you're not sure though lol.

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post #4 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:14 PM Thread Starter
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If theoretically they are down now, will they stay down, or could they go back up later? Or is it more like once they are down, they are down?

I have a friend with more colt experience whom I'm sure I can ask to confirm they are both there before I call the vet out. It looks like there are two, but one is higher than the other. I tried feeling to see if I felt two, but it was kind of hard to tell!

So if they are down, do you think I should call the vet out when it gets cool and the flies go away, say maybe towards the end of October? Does that sound okay? He would be around 3 months old then. It seems like most people wait a bit longer, but I worry it will be a muddy mess if I wait for the middle of winter.
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post #5 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:24 PM
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Just make sure they are really down. The person that originally gelded Solon thought they were on him and apparently it wasn't. And he was two years old. A few months later, he ended up dropping all the way and I had to take him back to the vet. I still don't understand how it happened. Vet said it could have been that the tools he had weren't big enough for my horse (draft - but at 2 didn't think that would make much of a difference).

So the first time I gelded him it was $120.00, the second it was $1200.00. Everyone blames his high pitch neigh on being gelded twice.

He was gelded in August and did just fine.

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post #6 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:26 PM
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Well the colder out that it gets they may move up again. Not to sound all icky-scientific, but sperm cannot survive in really cold temperatures or at body temperature either, which is why the nads hang in warm weather & then suck back up if it gets cold lol

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post #7 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solon View Post
Just make sure they are really down. The person that originally gelded Solon thought they were on him and apparently it wasn't. And he was two years old. A few months later, he ended up dropping all the way and I had to take him back to the vet. I still don't understand how it happened. Vet said it could have been that the tools he had weren't big enough for my horse (draft - but at 2 didn't think that would make much of a difference).

So the first time I gelded him it was $120.00, the second it was $1200.00. Everyone blames his high pitch neigh on being gelded twice.

He was gelded in August and did just fine.
That's kinda scary! It makes you wonder what they removed the first time!
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post #8 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by lilruffian View Post
Well the colder out that it gets they may move up again. Not to sound all icky-scientific, but sperm cannot survive in really cold temperatures or at body temperature either, which is why the nads hang in warm weather & then suck back up if it gets cold lol
It seems like I heard they can pull them back up, which is why I asked. Well, I guess I will just have to keep an eye on them(!) and see what happens. Is there any downside to gelding early? Like I was planning on waiting, but if they are actually there, could he be gelding now? Or is that a bad idea? I don't think I would want to geld him this soon, but I am just exploring my options.

The vet has told me on more than one occasion "he's going to be big" so I think he must be a big, robust colt for his age.
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post #9 of 23 Old 09-06-2010, 11:44 PM
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Personally, I think the vet started on the one, Solon realized what was going on, sucked up the other and the vet just said he got both. Thing is, he was a draft, the one I barely glanced at (I was so grossed out I though I was going to puke) was pretty darn big.

Even my main vet that did the second gelding was perplexed but he also said they can pull them back up.

If they are there, he can be gelded now. We have had colts at the barn and when they showed, their dangly bits were removed immediately. Worst case scenario is when they only drop one and after a year it's evident the vet is going to have to do the surgery to remove the other.

Unless it weighs a ton... it's just a horse. Draft horse motto.
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post #10 of 23 Old 09-07-2010, 04:00 PM
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my colt is almost 6 months old and was born on march 9th. And he has YET to drop at all. If you lay him down and lift on of his hind legs you can kind of see and feel one. But that's not technically dropped right? So I am having the same problem on when to geld and I really want to catch it soon so I have no problems since he is pastured with quite a few mares it might make him develope the studdyness early. So either my guy is dropping very late or your zane is dropping early! Lol


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