I Was Told I Have to Quarrantine Colt From Mother?
 
 

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I Was Told I Have to Quarrantine Colt From Mother?

This is a discussion on I Was Told I Have to Quarrantine Colt From Mother? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • When to seperate the mother horse from colt
  • My colt bred his mother

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    08-03-2011, 02:24 PM
  #1
Weanling
Question I Was Told I Have to Quarrantine Colt From Mother?

Yet, another foal question!
I was told a colt needs to be quarantined from his mother after he is weaned and given shots. Is this necessary and if it is why?
     
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    08-03-2011, 06:56 PM
  #2
Weanling
Bump bump!
     
    08-03-2011, 07:00 PM
  #3
Showing
First off, is this an intact colt or a gelding? Being intact is enough of a reason to keep him separated from a mare, his mother or not.

If he's a gelding, it's better for him to interact with other horses who aren't his mother, or the weaning may not take. You'd have to wean him all over again, and the second time around would most likely be more traumatic than the first.

Being vaccinated has nothing to do with horses being kept separate, so you probably misinterpreted that.
     
    08-03-2011, 07:05 PM
  #4
Weanling
He's only a 2 month old (mini) colt at the moment but I do want to get him gelded. There really isn't a place for me to separate him to so I was wondering if I actually have to do that. I was going to let him just naturally wean himself because of that.
     
    08-03-2011, 07:17 PM
  #5
Banned
Two months is very early to wean, and rather early to geld, too. Not that you technically can't geld this early, but most wait a few more months.
     
    08-03-2011, 07:48 PM
  #6
Banned
In answer to your question, the "quarantine" or separation is because he needs to be separated from his dam until she dries up. Even after actual weaning, some foals will nurse for comfort, and if they do the mare will keep lactating or restart if she is not quite dried up. If you put them back together too soon, you will likely end up having to start the process all over again. It takes about 2 weeks for a foal to be actually weaned, but you should wait an additional 2 weeks before putting them back together. Those are just general guidelines, of course - both mares and foals will vary.

As Speed Racer said, the vaccs have nothing to do with weaning. The immunity provided by the colostrum only lasts so long, and once its affect wears off the foal will need vaccs. The easiest time to do that is during weaning so doting momma doesn't give everyone a hard time while they are handling the foal.

After the mare dries up there is no need to separate them unless you have a ravager in your herd, in which case both should be separated together. The foal needs to be with its mother for at least 6 months - ideally a year, to give her time to school him. If they are together, he should be gelded NLT 6 months...
     
    08-03-2011, 08:59 PM
  #7
Weanling
I don't mean to say I'm going to geld or wean him at this age.... I'm definitely not! It's just that he and his mother are going to be staying at a place with about an acre and a half of fenced pasture with a run-in then they'll be moving to my place which will be basically the same thing and I have no place to separate them at all! So I was wondering the reason I was told they had to be separated and if they absolutely had to be because it's not really practical.
     
    08-03-2011, 09:06 PM
  #8
Showing
Whether or not it's practical for you, in order for the foal to be weaned correctly he and his mother need to be separated for it to take. Otherwise, you're going to have a yearling still suckling, and he may knock up his own dam to boot.
     
    08-03-2011, 10:28 PM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Whether or not it's practical for you, in order for the foal to be weaned correctly he and his mother need to be separated for it to take. Otherwise, you're going to have a yearling still suckling, and he may knock up his own dam to boot.
I guess in that case she would be dam knocked up?...
     
    08-03-2011, 11:03 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Whether or not it's practical for you, in order for the foal to be weaned correctly he and his mother need to be separated for it to take. Otherwise, you're going to have a yearling still suckling, and he may knock up his own dam to boot.
This!
Unfortunately, these are the situations that arise when we choose to take on the animals we do and we are the ones obligated to figure out how to make it all work. There are plenty of options that you can explore before the time actually comes which would make doing it correctly as inexpensive as possible.
     

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