Mare and foal care before and after
   

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Mare and foal care before and after

This is a discussion on Mare and foal care before and after within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • How to care for mare expecting foal before and after
  • Building a horse shelter

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    03-17-2013, 05:45 PM
  #1
Yearling
Mare and foal care before and after

As many of you know, I bought a 4 year old mare from a rescue that may be bred. She was in with two stallions at the farm (not the rescue), one being her half brother and then other her full brother. She is out of a paint stallion, and either a Morgan mare or a QH one (story got changed every time it was told). She was unhandled, but since being at the rescue she has been halter broke and is coming along beautifully and loves to please. I have yet to see her, but she will be brought home (by a neighbor) hopefully on the 24th and I will, hopefully get to see her the next weekend.

I plan on getting her hooves and teeth done when I'm home and then hopefully will be able to get her vet checked soon as well. She did have a vet check and dewormer right after getting to the rescue.

What should I get done as far as vet goes? I am planning on, preg check, coggins, health, overall check up.
If she is bred, is there any supplements I should have her on? What minerals should I provide?
If she is bred she will be due sometime in October. Therein lies my other concerns.
What do I need as far as shelter for her and the foal? I was thinking a shed (don't have the money for a complete barn), and probably blanketing the foal, if not both.
Here are couple pictures that I found while looking online for horse shelters.





I like the looks of the first one a little better, because it would offer better protection from our winter weather. I think I could also stall off the enclosed area so you could lock a horse in there. What do you think? My dad has a sawmill and my brothers like to build stuff so I think I'll be able to save a bit of money if I get them to build it. I would help as much as I could, of course.
What size would be good? Maybe 14' wide and 24' long?
That would give a 12' by 14' stall.

I will post a picture of my mare and the two possible daddies.

Ruby


Ruby


Bullet (half paint half Morgan)... Supposed full brother to Ruby.


And the best picture that I found of Splash (half paint half appy, he is the appy colored one), he is a half brother to Ruby


Splash's head


All three horses' sire



Thank you for any advice!
     
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    03-17-2013, 06:21 PM
  #2
Weanling
Hey,

Sorry to hear about your mare being pregnant, especially since they decided to keep it in the family lol. But, of course, you will likely end up with a completely healthy foal. We acquired a filly and colt who had been kept together prior to us purchasing them and prior to the colt being gelded. We ended up with an adorable, healthy little filly a couple months later lol. She's almost two now and is one of the favorites :)

We've had mid-winter babies before and although its obviously very far from ideal (I'm located even further north than you), it CAN be done. I'd aim to have the mare deliver the foal in that stall though. Besides safety from predators, you need to be aware of risk of frostbite. I've known several horses who had little round teddy bear ears from frostbite as foals.

You're lucky that you'd have help to build a shed. I like both those designs, but am thinking that it wouldn't be much of an extra step to add a door. You could even reduce the size to a large box stall (could probably google for appropriate dimensions). By putting a door on there and using bedding you will have a tiny "barn" for the mare and foal if it gets cold, at night, or whatever. Prior to the foaling date you could (and will have to) get the mare used to the stall though by keeping her in at nights.

Then I'd have a little blanket for baby for during the day :)

I wont comment on supplements because I'm still learning myself
anniegirl likes this.
     
    03-17-2013, 06:26 PM
  #3
Yearling
Thank you! I just started looking at designs of shelters. I am actually really liking the first one, and then thinking to completely close off half off it for a 'indoor' stall and leaving the other part for a run in. I'll talk to my brother about design. He would know what would work or not.

I hadn't thought of frostbite. I should have, always a big problem with calves that are winter born (thankfully we calve in May/June, but have had a few accident calves).

I'm a bit worried about her having a healthy foal because of it being from a half or full brother, hopefully, if she does foal, it'll be healthy.
     
    03-17-2013, 06:46 PM
  #4
Yearling
OK I can't comment on barns as we don't need them over here LOL but I can comment on supplements as I am a firm believer in them.

Find a supplement (vit and min) that is made for the conditions of your area - IE we are very low on selenium and magnesium here - and make sure you feed the BEST QUALITY you can afford - it really DOES make a a difference!!!
Don't use the tubs - use the vit min mix you add to the feed that way you know exactly how much she is getting.
If you don't live right next to the sea FEED SALT!!! Especially if the horse is grazing green grass or a high potassium feed such as lucerne. Don't just rely on a salt lick - my horses get 3 tbsp full A DAY.

The next best advice I can give is to develop a really close bond with the mare - this will be invaluable when it comes to foaling and handling the foal.
Gauge how much feed you feed by the condition of your mare - don't let her get too fat or too thin. (Sounds obvious I know) and always have GOOD QUALITY hay ad lib.
Other than that good luck
dbarabians and anniegirl like this.
     
    03-17-2013, 06:52 PM
  #5
Trained
Galloping I have bred a half brother and sister and am expecting their 4 th foal this year. All pure bred horses are inbred to some extent. It is a common practice and I have several mares whose sires are also the sire of their dams.
This is the most certain way to set type and if the individuals are very correct it makes sense. I have seen registered horses that were bred to full siblings without any issues. If you are going to breed this foal in the future as closely related as its parents are I would look for an outcross. Good luck. Shalom
     
    03-17-2013, 07:01 PM
  #6
Yearling
Thank you! I'm starting a list for what to ask the vet about. And I'll be looking into what vitamins and minerals are lacking in our area. I will be doing what I can with the mare, I will be gone all summer but I will have one of my sister's taking care of her, and will have them working with her.

Also I plan on having her and my gelding in a separate pen from the rest of the herd. I want them to have different care then what the other three horses receive. I will see if I can 'rent' the one pasture from my parents. My gelding has been with a foal before (from newborn to 4 months old) and he was perfectly fine. He is the lead/boss horse of the herd, but he's not mean. He usually has a 'henchman' to do his dirty work. Right now that would be my brother's horse Red.

Db, I am not planning on breeding Ruby again or her foal if it's a filly. If I go to raise horses it'll be an endangered breed (probably the Akhal-Teke if possible), not a grade paint cross. But thank you for the advice.
dbarabians, Merlot and anniegirl like this.
     
    03-17-2013, 09:00 PM
  #7
Started
I would test the mare for frame/lethal white if she is confirmed pregnant. The reason is because the sire of all three is frame. If your mare received frame as well as the baby daddy (if pregnant), the resulting foal has a 25% chance of being a lethal white and would die slowly, painfully if not uthanized in the first 72 hours of life. If she is pregnant and tests negative for frame, it is one less worry for you ;)
GallopingGuitarist likes this.
     
    03-17-2013, 09:04 PM
  #8
Yearling
I will look into that for sure! It would be good to know anyways.
     
    03-17-2013, 09:33 PM
  #9
Yearling
Okay I just have to print off the form (paid for it) and then get the hairs from Ruby when I see her. Then it'll be off in the mail.
SunnyDraco likes this.
     
    03-17-2013, 11:08 PM
  #10
Weanling
Wow...everyone has already offered some very helpful advice...I would just like to say thank you for helping Ruby out:):) I have a paint gelding "Jasper" that I rescued in dec of last year...he is my boyyy...I don't know what I would do without him:) Good luck with everything and keep us posted!!!
GallopingGuitarist likes this.
     

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