Mare and foal care before and after - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeding

Mare and foal care before and after

This is a discussion on Mare and foal care before and after within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Can mares with foals have sugar beet

Like Tree18Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-17-2013, 11:21 PM
  #11
Yearling
Thank you! Is your Jasper in your profile pic? If so, he's pretty!
I can't wait to meet Ruby! The lady at the rescue says that she is really eager to please and is a joy to work with. Really hoping that I can get Easter break off from work and be able to go up and see my girl!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-18-2013, 03:35 PM
  #12
Yearling
Pretty sound advice so far. :)
For me,my preggo girls get full time access to salt and mineral,and a good quality hay (with NO fescue,of course) and/or grass,depending on the season. I also feed a mare supplement (I use Front Runner Phase 2) that is specially formulated for pregnant/lactating mares,mixed with a few oats,along with beet pulp if needed. When it comes closer to foaling time,they're put in a separate pen that has access to a stall in the barn/shop,as well as pasture if I want to let them out for exercise or grazing.
I wouldn't worry too much about the inbreeding thing;it is a common practice among some breeders to inbreed to some extent,and there are generally no issues. :)
     
    03-18-2013, 05:03 PM
  #13
Super Moderator
If you have a good vet then you should rely on him/her to advise on vaccinations if the mare is actually in foal.
I like to put good mineral licks out regardless of if horses are in foal and then depending on whether she is or not buy a complete feed that has a balance of all the vitamins and minerals already added to it that's aimed at a mare in foal and then one that's feeding a foal. You can then add chop and sugar beet to that to bulk it up if you need too when the weather gets bad.
Not sure what plans you have for keeping a source of water in freezing weather but a mare producing milk needs a constant supply
If you have a good field shelter that you can bed down then I personally wouldnt put rugs on either of them. Foals can get a habit for chewing rugs that can result in a choke situation or get caught up in straps very easily and do themselves some serious injury, even death. The time to watch is if you get bad snow storms and they don't go into the shelter, a foal that age is at risk of getting buried or suffering hypothermia. You might have to consider a way of shutting them inside overnight or making a smaller corral area around the shelter that they can be fastened in.
     
    03-18-2013, 05:11 PM
  #14
Yearling
Thank you! I have no idea if our vet in Preeceville is very good or not, but I will be asking him. We've only had to get his help a couple times and haven't ever had him out to the farm. I might get my dad or my brother to haul my mare into town to the vet to get the checkup done.

I've talked to my brother and asked him about the shelter. He said he'd think about it. I think if I built one like the one in the first one I pictured and then stalled off part of it that would work for putting the mare and foal in over night. Water can be hauled from the pump house. The only small pen with access to the watering bowl is full of sheep.

I'll get her preg checked and if she is bred then planning will go into full force. Where to build the shelter, feed, extra supplements, etc.
     
    03-18-2013, 05:21 PM
  #15
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by GallopingGuitarist    
Thank you! I have no idea if our vet in Preeceville is very good or not, but I will be asking him. We've only had to get his help a couple times and haven't ever had him out to the farm. I might get my dad or my brother to haul my mare into town to the vet to get the checkup done.

I've talked to my brother and asked him about the shelter. He said he'd think about it. I think if I built one like the one in the first one I pictured and then stalled off part of it that would work for putting the mare and foal in over night. Water can be hauled from the pump house. The only small pen with access to the watering bowl is full of sheep.

I'll get her preg checked and if she is bred then planning will go into full force. Where to build the shelter, feed, extra supplements, etc.
Its a good idea to get an experienced horse vet on board and then have then on speed dial. Foaling is pretty natural and most mares cope fine but being prepared is better than not IMO. We had a few complications over the years but always had someone in the family, later on my boss and then my husband who were experienced in difficult calvings to deal with things and speed can be a life and death difference.
Most mares have the sense to go into shelter but that can all be freaking stupid if the mind takes them which is why in bad weather I'm more inclined to shut mine in and not take risks
     
    03-18-2013, 05:26 PM
  #16
Yearling
Up 'in the bush' where my family is there aren't any 'equine vets' per say. But I for sure will be talking to the vet we have.

The only mares we've foaled out did it by themselves no problem. So we were lucky that way. I really hope I'm home when when/if she does foal.

We have calved out hundreds of cows and lambed a few sheep as well. I hope that nothing goes wrong and if there is something a little out of line it's not major. Most folks would get the vet out after the mare foals right? I should probably plan on that.
     
    03-19-2013, 01:49 AM
  #17
Trained
Unless the mare has complications or the foal is weak I do not have the vet come out just to check the pair.
I do have them inspect the afterbirth if I find it. My mares foal in pastures no stalls and I have only witnessed a few, gotten there right after.
Since you are familar with cows and sheep then mares are not really that different. IMO have much fewer problems foaling than other livestock.
Good luck Shalom
     
    03-20-2013, 10:37 AM
  #18
Weanling
Good luck with your new horse. I'd do exactly what you've already got planned - vet, vaccinations, teeth, farrier etc and take your vets advice on what to vaccinate for and if your mare is in foal, start her on good nutrition right away.
I knew nothing about horses/foals at all - but when my son was left with a pregnant mare, we all learned pretty quick.
I'm in the UK so horse breeds, medicines, vaccinations, food etc is different over here to a lot of things I read about on this site, but the advice and support can be invaluable - there's always somebody who's been there and done that and can offer a word of encouragement.
Our magic feed was sugarbeet in putting weight on our pregnant TB. Despite the best of everything, she was notoriously difficult to get any weight on and that was our saviour. We mix it with chop, stud mix to help with her milk (vets advice) and she has a full vitamin powder supplement in it as well as garlic powder, and apple and carrots (and my dad always put a mint in the bottom lol). As well as unlimited haylage and she's gone from strength to strength (and to deliver a beautiful colt last Thursday who's just perfect).


We had a shelter similar to the first (but not as posh lol) which had a flag floor - laid straight onto the grass. This had been there for years and was bone dry until last summer when we've had such dreadful we weather. The flags lifted and we couldn't keep the wet out, so we've ended up concreting the floor and now it's perfect. Dry and warm when the door's shut - the little colt was fast asleep when I went down an hour ago - bedded on a foot of shavings haha. So from experience, I would have a solid floor if you can - for warmth and comfort. Ours hasn't yet ventured outside as it's just too wet and the field too boggy - hopefully it'll be drier weather this weekend and we can roll the field - something else to think about (depending on your land).
If she is in foal, i'd start these preperations asap if finances allow - we started later than I would have liked and have still to make the ground outside the stable solid (it's ok now, but not as I wan't it to be).

And despite having a lovely relationship with Fox, the day after she foaled, whe turned into a monster mummy - that's wearing off now - I was able to muck out half of her stable this morning without her pinning her ears back - but prepare for the protective mare instinct to kick in after delivering - that surprised my husband the most (Fox adores him) - I think he was shocked when she kicked out at him at the weekend - I've just been keeping out of there - who's the clever one now

Haven't a clue about paint/frame etc so i'll leave that to the experts x

Good luck and keep up posted - we're an impatient lot!
GallopingGuitarist likes this.
     
    03-20-2013, 11:35 AM
  #19
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by GallopingGuitarist    
Up 'in the bush' where my family is there aren't any 'equine vets' per say. But I for sure will be talking to the vet we have.

The only mares we've foaled out did it by themselves no problem. So we were lucky that way. I really hope I'm home when when/if she does foal.

We have calved out hundreds of cows and lambed a few sheep as well. I hope that nothing goes wrong and if there is something a little out of line it's not major. Most folks would get the vet out after the mare foals right? I should probably plan on that.
You should cope just fine if you have experience calving cows
Foals get immunity from their mothers that keeps them going for a while - just have something for the umbilical cord - really important that its kept free of infection potentials. Mostly an iodine solution is used but some vets prefer a Chlorhexidine solution like Nolvasan now
db mentioned checking the afterbirth - really important as retention will cause serious infections, septicaemia, metritis and can cause laminitis. If you don't find all the afterbirth because vermin have been at it - this is why I prefer mares to foal in a smallish well confined area - keep a close eye for the mare seeming off colour and her temperature going up. We had one mare that had retention problems every time she foaled and had to have oxytocin shots and be flushed out.
The UK poster (Reckyroo?) made a good point on the flooring - you get bad weather where you are so concrete or rubber matting laid on a good layer of stone would be good. A TB mare we had was very antsy with us when she had her first foal too - it was called 'Dave' for half a day and then when we were able to get hold of her & safely get near it we discovered it was a filly and renamed Daisy!!!
GallopingGuitarist likes this.
     
    03-20-2013, 12:18 PM
  #20
Yearling
I like both shelters, however how hard are they going to be to get cleaned out?
Something to think about.
I also Like Hoffmans Horse Minerals - Horse Mineral - Horse Feed If your hay is lacking, this should cover it. I have all my horses on it.
GallopingGuitarist likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Maiden mare in foal, due to foal very soon MattJohnston Horse Breeding 55 04-24-2012 11:10 PM
How Much Vet Care Does a Foal Need and When Can He be Weaned? poundinghooves Horse Health 6 06-28-2011 11:17 PM
Breeding-Mare and foal care 13kielj Horse Breeding 1 12-31-2009 12:24 AM
Foal and mare care Vidaloco Horse Breeding 1 12-09-2007 11:01 AM
Best mare/foal care methods AKPaintLover Horse Breeding 10 12-03-2007 01:46 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0