Not gelding a horse that you have no intention of breeding - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

 263Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 98 Old 03-08-2013, 08:41 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,963
• Horses: 0
Sounds like he has to stop sympathizing with the horse use the logic & brain between his ears not his legs.Which is ALSO the reason the horse should be gelded & make for a better riding horse for you.
Jalter likes this.
paintedpastures is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 02:57 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Alaska
Posts: 296
• Horses: 0
There is also some evidence (Though not everyone agrees!) to suggest that gelding before puberty results in a taller mature height due to the testosterone not closing the growth plates early. I concur with the idea that a testosterone driven life with no opportunity to have an outlet for that (Breeding) would be terrible. The isolation necessary to ensure no unwanted breedings. The difficulty finding venues for riding/training/showing/boarding. All seems completely unnecessary to me. In fact, I wish they had a quicker, easier methods to spay mares too!
Also, testicular cancer is a non issue with a gelding....just sayin.
Ray MacDonald, ParaIndy and Jalter like this.
doubleopi is offline  
post #23 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 03:04 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Just south of sanity
Posts: 16,271
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jalter View Post
I found a guy that is horse smart AND will let me keep a horse for myself.
What do you mean he'll LET YOU keep a horse for yourself? Aren't you an able bodied adult who can think and pay for things yourself? Why the heck would you need a man to 'let you' do anything? If you're that dependent on him, I suggest you get a job and learn to take care of yourself.

As far as him thinking it's 'not fair' just because a horse has bad breeding, that's the MAIN reason you geld other than temperament.

Regardless of what you say, he sure as heck doesn't sound very horse smart to me.

You want the truth? You can't HANDLE the truth!
Speed Racer is online now  
post #24 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 03:40 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 353
• Horses: 1
Another thing i've heard about stallions (correct me if i'm wrong) is that the longer they are left as "stallions" means that they learn stallion behaviour and re-training them out of it can be difficult - if they are gelded at a younger age, they don't learn the whole "mares are the centre of my universe" thinking.
Ray MacDonald and ParaIndy like this.
Reckyroo is offline  
post #25 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 03:59 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 2,475
• Horses: 0
If you can't handle a horse if he is intact, then more than likely the problem lies with your handling. Gelding will help take some factors out of the equation, but gelding is not a magic cure-all for male behavioral issues.

If there is no intent to breed, and no incentive to breed from the horse(Ie. Being breeding quality. Bloodlines, conformation, temperament, training, all that fun stuff), then yes, it is a good idea to geld. What if you had to sell him? A lot of people have strong reservations about buying a stallion due to mishandling. That will only cause the horse to decrease in value.

Studs are liabilities. What if your neighbor gets a mare and he decides to jump the fence for a visit? What if he causes property damage or hurts your neighbor's horse or other livestock? What if he is hit by a car on the road?

Nah, unless you have intent to breed, there is far too much potential stress involved. Geld him to stave off worries. If he is well behaved and well handled now, and you are not in a position financially for the procedure, then great. Keep handling him well until you do.
ParaIndy and Jalter like this.
LadyDreamer is offline  
post #26 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 04:13 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 353
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer View Post
If you can't handle a horse if he is intact, then more than likely the problem lies with your handling. Gelding will help take some factors out of the equation, but gelding is not a magic cure-all for male behavioral issues.

I've personally never had a stallion - so I couldn't comment on my handling of one - my sons ex had one and he was the sweetest horse around - until he was sent away to "learn some manners for a stallion grading" and then he changed, was fearful and guarded of everyone - I think he'd been trained how "stallions" are trained, even though he was the easiest horse to handle - it was just a theory i'd heard - but if my baby's a colt, he'll be nutless before he even knows what they are
Jalter likes this.
Reckyroo is offline  
post #27 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 04:18 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Chino Valley, AZ
Posts: 15,483
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckyroo View Post
Another thing i've heard about stallions (correct me if i'm wrong) is that the longer they are left as "stallions" means that they learn stallion behaviour and re-training them out of it can be difficult - if they are gelded at a younger age, they don't learn the whole "mares are the centre of my universe" thinking.
I think it depends on the stallion. I rode a Peruvian paso who had been used as a breeding stallion his whole life and was gelded at 13. He was a perfect gentleman around all horses, mares in heat or not.
Posted via Mobile Device
DraftyAiresMum is offline  
post #28 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 04:21 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 353
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum View Post
I think it depends on the stallion. I rode a Peruvian paso who had been used as a breeding stallion his whole life and was gelded at 13. He was a perfect gentleman around all horses, mares in heat or not.
Posted via Mobile Device
My son's ex's stallion was the same - never tried to run a fence, or push himself onto our mare until he was allowed in the field with her with the intention of breeding - which he did - but that didn't change his behaviour towards us or the mare x

Like I said, it was a theory i'd heard and wasn't sure if the stallion I knew was a rarity
Reckyroo is offline  
post #29 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Wendover, NV
Posts: 312
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer View Post
What do you mean he'll LET YOU keep a horse for yourself? Aren't you an able bodied adult who can think and pay for things yourself? Why the heck would you need a man to 'let you' do anything? If you're that dependent on him, I suggest you get a job and learn to take care of yourself.

As far as him thinking it's 'not fair' just because a horse has bad breeding, that's the MAIN reason you geld other than temperament.

Regardless of what you say, he sure as heck doesn't sound very horse smart to me.
I don't see why you have to be rude. You don't know our situation, so I suggest you don't tell me how to live my life. I have a job, and am more than capable of taking care of myself. We share finances, so yes, I care if the expenses of a horse bother him. It doesn't so it's no issue.
Posted via Mobile Device
Druydess likes this.
Jalter is offline  
post #30 of 98 Old 03-09-2013, 04:34 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Olds, AB Canada
Posts: 2,749
• Horses: 2
You can have they bestest stallion in the world.... He could have perfect conformation, temperment and training....

90% of the time they will be angels!
10% they will be absolute sh*t heads...

You always have to watch them because if they see a mare and you don't get their attention back to you quickly, they will run you over to get to that mare. You can NEVER turn your back to a stallion. They are hardwired to fight and breed. They don't even know they are going to do it but then some instinct clicks in their mind and they just do it...

Mare and gelding that are mentally sound, will always think before they do something because they will figure out if thy are going to get punished for the action they will perform...

Such as biting... They will get smacked
But they know if they walk up to you and nuzzle you they wont
ParaIndy, Jalter and Reckyroo like this.

Horses are scared of two things... Things that move and things that don't.
Ray MacDonald is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Define 'breeding stock' in terms of a gelding? alexischristina Horse Breeding 10 12-13-2011 12:20 PM
Gelding 6yr old & Breeding AI AKPaintLover Horse Breeding 23 08-14-2008 04:44 PM
2 yr old breeding stock paint gelding Samantha Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 02-06-2008 09:58 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome