Pasture breeding - young colt.
 
 

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Pasture breeding - young colt.

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  • I have had my mare in the pasture with a stud for two weeks when should they breed
  • Pasture breeeding

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    07-11-2012, 02:35 PM
  #1
Yearling
Pasture breeding - young colt.

Okay, please don't rip me apart here, at least not too bad! I have an honest situation and looking for advice. I have a neighbor who would like a foal. She is a highly experienced horse woman and she used to breed. She has lost her stallion, and now has asked if she can breed my colt if it works out. He is only one and a half so she wants to put him in with her mare, and just let it happen...

Rocky is very well mannered and has indeed displayed he is ready. He is now in with her and they've become best friends. Is this honestly alright? I know people have "accidents" happen. He is young and I didn't want to control the breeding and have it go to his head. She just wants to see if they'll breed once and then he will be gelded.

I guess I'm just looking for advice, they have been in for a week now and no action. I really think he is too young to realize what he needs to do. Would you say leave them together if everything is fine or should I just pull them and geld him?

I still work with him daily, it has not changed his attitude or demeanor at all, he is just in with Chyenne instead of my other gelding.

**We have consulted a vet recently, he said that if all worked out just let it happen naturally since he is so young. Also to be careful not to control the breeding and don't force it. Just let him be a young horse!
     
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    07-11-2012, 02:45 PM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
Okay, please don't rip me apart here, at least not too bad! I have an honest situation and looking for advice. I have a neighbor who would like a foal. She is a highly experienced horse woman and she used to breed. She has lost her stallion, and now has asked if she can breed my colt if it works out. He is only one and a half so she wants to put him in with her mare, and just let it happen...

Rocky is very well mannered and has indeed displayed he is ready. He is now in with her and they've become best friends. Is this honestly alright? I know people have "accidents" happen. He is young and I didn't want to control the breeding and have it go to his head. She just wants to see if they'll breed once and then he will be gelded.

I guess I'm just looking for advice, they have been in for a week now and no action. I really think he is too young to realize what he needs to do. Would you say leave them together if everything is fine or should I just pull them and geld him?

I still work with him daily, it has not changed his attitude or demeanor at all, he is just in with Chyenne instead of my other gelding.

**We have consulted a vet recently, he said that if all worked out just let it happen naturally since he is so young. Also to be careful not to control the breeding and don't force it. Just let him be a young horse!
I don't see a problem with it necessarily. The vet was consulted, if it's going to happen then it's going to happen.

I personally wouldn't breed one that young, but that is your choice. I don't think it will do him any harm being in with the mare, and actually may teach him some manners about how to behave around mares. If the breeding is planned and wanted, with the vet giving the okay, then I would not pull him.

Be advised that he may get an attitude after he is used as a stud. And gelding him may not do anything after that, it's all individual to the horse. Be prepared for that, and then let them do their thing.

Number one thing to remember, this is your horse, so you get the say in the breeding up until that mare has taken, unless otherwise agreed upon with the mares owner.

Oh and BTW, unless you've been out 24/7 youll never know if there was action or not. And if the mare hasn't come into heat yet, she will not allow said action. But it wouldn't be too uncommon for her to come into heat, get bred, and then take without you even seeing the "action"
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    07-11-2012, 02:53 PM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
I don't see a problem with it necessarily. The vet was consulted, if it's going to happen then it's going to happen.

I personally wouldn't breed one that young, but that is your choice. I don't think it will do him any harm being in with the mare, and actually may teach him some manners about how to behave around mares. If the breeding is planned and wanted, with the vet giving the okay, then I would not pull him.

Be advised that he may get an attitude after he is used as a stud. And gelding him may not do anything after that, it's all individual to the horse. Be prepared for that, and then let them do their thing.

Number one thing to remember, this is your horse, so you get the say in the breeding up until that mare has taken, unless otherwise agreed upon with the mares owner.

Oh and BTW, unless you've been out 24/7 youll never know if there was action or not. And if the mare hasn't come into heat yet, she will not allow said action. But it wouldn't be too uncommon for her to come into heat, get bred, and then take without you even seeing the "action"
Thank you! That's what I figured the BO, owner of the mare lives on property and is always watching for the most part. I do get text updates from her very often, and usually some pretty funny ones when she thinks he is up to something. He is most indeed mine, and I feel comfortable with it up to now. We have agreed that at anytime I can pull him if I do not like what's going on, he starts coping an attitude and so on. She is a smaller paint at 14.1 and he is already taller than her so size isn't an issue.

The vet also is scheduled to do checkups every few weeks unless we seperate them.
     
    07-11-2012, 02:56 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
Thank you! That's what I figured the BO, owner of the mare lives on property and is always watching for the most part. I do get text updates from her very often, and usually some pretty funny ones when she thinks he is up to something. He is most indeed mine, and I feel comfortable with it up to now. We have agreed that at anytime I can pull him if I do not like what's going on, he starts coping an attitude and so on. She is a smaller paint at 14.1 and he is already taller than her so size isn't an issue.

The vet also is scheduled to do checkups every few weeks unless we seperate them.
Well then I honestly see no problem with it. Sounds like you have your basics covered.
     
    07-11-2012, 02:59 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
Well then I honestly see no problem with it. Sounds like you have your basics covered.
Thanks again, was mostly just to ease my worry. I didn't see anything very wrong with it all. Just also wanted to see if anyone's dealt with the same situation. There's no pressure on them or the situation, if it doesn't happen, it doesn't happen. I will have to post pictures of the both of them tomorrow.
     
    07-11-2012, 03:00 PM
  #6
Yearling
Well, all breeding debates aside, you're being responsible and having the vet out regularly. And I agree the mare will teach him a thing or two about how to act toward the women. Having a colt separated and then introduced as a grown stud usually ends up with him getting a few whacks for assuming he can get away with anything with the girls.

However! You mentioned the mare is paint, and I'd always be wary of breeding paints without testing for frame first. To me, I don't even care if they look remotely frame (which I do see some frame indicators in Rocky to be honest), and it would scare me too much to risk it. But then, that's one of my fears, and I am testing even my solid just to be on the safe side. Lol
     
    07-11-2012, 03:00 PM
  #7
Started
I would most definitely be looking for new boarding arrangements and vet.
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    07-11-2012, 03:11 PM
  #8
Foal
I don't see anything wrong with it, but he is REALLY young. They usually don't even know what to do till 2-3. Even at 3 they tend to not get it right as they are still soo young. If yall are wanting to breed I say wait for another year and see then, but if you want it to be quickly to get him gelded. I wouldn't count on the breeding to actually happen. Good luck!
     
    07-11-2012, 03:12 PM
  #9
Yearling
I'll tell you my story just because it shows what can happen with this type of breeding and advise you to have an agreement if something goes wrong. No judgement on your decision to offer him for breeding purposes but will ask - Why him? Just because he is available, am assuming you aren't charging and she doesn't have to do any work per se or does he have really good breeding and would perhaps compliment her mare? What is the benefit to you? Several years ago I bought a mare that was in foal and she had a beautiful stud colt. We had the horses on someone else's property (MIL) and said property owner thought it was cute to put him in with two of my other mares to watch them "play". We didn't find out about it until the older mare kicked him hard enough to crack his cannon bone and one of the tarsals. We spent months rehabbing him and the cost was not cheap. 11 months later this same mare delivered a filly that is so badly roach backed she is unuseable for riding. Woulda, coulda, shoulda. Had I known MIL was so ignorant to be polite about it I would have had him gelded at six months when he dropped and not waited until cooler, drier weather which for us meant waiting another 6 months. Since we had the leg issues to deal with the vet didn't want to risk reinjuring and suggested we give his leg more time since he didn't have a tilt table. Add to that he is a draft and by the time he fully recovered the vet decided since he had never gelded a draft of that age and size he didn't want to take on the responsibility. At the time we had no other vet in the area so he is still a stallion. Granted he is kept with one other horse for companionship and we have a place for him but because of this genetic flaw that he can pass we can't put our other mares on this piece of property which limits our pasture options. Did it effect his personality? - No he's really sweet, never pushy and has been well behaved even when the riding stable's horses have gotten loose and all end up in the alley we have between the pastures on this property. As long as we take things easy and keep him away from road work (light farming or logging has been OK) and only work him with his pasture mate we have no issues. I haven't been able to sell him though for his potential lameness issues and I won't breed him as I know he has the potential to pass on roach back. I also now have the responsibility of the care and upkeep of his daughter as she isn't saleable. Think it over before you agree and understand that things can and do go wrong even with the best of intentions on your part.
     
    07-11-2012, 03:14 PM
  #10
Yearling
Thank you all! Rocky has been tested and is homozygous for tobiano and he does not carry frame. She does not either. We are safe there, I figure like you said filly it may not happen at all, he is still pretty clueless to what happens down there! So we shall she.
     

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