Picking a HUS AQHA stud to breed with an HYPP N/H mare - Page 3
   

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Picking a HUS AQHA stud to breed with an HYPP N/H mare

This is a discussion on Picking a HUS AQHA stud to breed with an HYPP N/H mare within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Fee for registering hypp n/h foal
  • Will aqha stop registering n/h horses

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    11-28-2011, 11:13 AM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
Faceman, the only reason that only colts are gelded is because to sterilize a mare is cost prohibitive, not suggesting sex link in the disease. I only posted the study as an example why some folks are not for radically eliminating all SCID carriers from the gene pool, as they were when SCID was first discovered. Not implying right or wrong for their breeding decisions either. I'm just trying to corelate the information I'm getting about HYPP with something I understand better, which is SCID.
I understand - I was just pointing out the "study" was flawed. Elementary logic tells you a genetic disease that is not sex linked cannot be eradicated in 25 years by sterilization of only one gender.

Just my opinion, of course, but personally I have no respect for Arab folk that breed SCID carriers. Their mantra that you can avoid the disease by not breeding carrier to carrier is nothing more than rationalization for irresponsible breeding...it perpetuates the genetic flaw generation after generation. It is no different than the TB folk who breed Big Brown, thus perpetuating his ancestry of unsound feet, or a breeder that breeds an N/H horse, thus perpetuating the HYPP genetic flaw.

It is, of course, highly unlikely that these genetic issues can be bred out of our equine population entirely due to the prevalence of ignorant backyard and novice breeders that don't know any better. However, shame on those breeders who do it knowingly, and shame on the registries for registering carriers. Let's call a spade a spade here - there is only one reason a registry would permit registration of a carrier of a negative genetic flaw and register its offspring...money. And money seems to supercede what is in the best interest of the breed and the species. How very sad...there is no logical reason these issues cannot be eradicated from our registered horse population - no reason at all...
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    11-28-2011, 01:09 PM
  #22
Super Moderator
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    11-28-2011, 01:13 PM
  #23
Super Moderator
To the OP. It sounds like you are fairly ignorant regarding the disease itself. It's not really that surprising because unless you are heavily into the QH world, it's not as common information as the folks on this forum are making it out to be. Before I bred my mare who is HYPP/NN, I knew very little about the "Impressive Syndrome", which is the name I knew it by. I knew that it caused temporarily paralysis but not much more.

This is an older website but I feel it will be helpful to you: Index

And of course the AQHA site with information:

AQHA - HYPP INFORMATION

Hope that helps you.
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    11-28-2011, 01:29 PM
  #24
Yearling
THIS IS FROM you.C. DAVIS ABOUT DILUTING OUT HYPP

Horse HYPP

Myths about HYPP
Some people have felt that the disease can be diluted out and not carried to distant generations. This is false because an affected horse has just as much chance to pass on the trait as the affected parent which passed the gene to him. Some people also believe the horse will "grow out of it." This is not true. For unknown reasons, attacks of HYPP tend to occur most often at the beginning of intense training and fitting for shows (age three to seven years old). It is important to realize that horses with HYPP are affected for life. It is possible that older horses do not experience the same conditioning stresses as young horses or owners have discovered the best management strategies for the older horses with HYPP.
Some people also think that if a horse does not show any signs up to a certain age, it does not carry the trait. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Once again, horses with HYPP are affected for life. There was a stallion and a broodmare with HYPP who did not show signs of the disease until age eight and 15, and both horses only experienced one isolated attack.
Owners and breeders of affected horses should inform prospective buyers of the management constraints these horses have and the potential for future episodes of HYPP
     
    11-28-2011, 01:33 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
to the op. It sounds like you are fairly ignorant regarding the disease itself. It's not really that surprising because unless you are heavily into the qh world, it's not as common information as the folks on this forum are making it out to be. Before I bred my mare who is hypp/nn, I knew very little about the "impressive syndrome", which is the name I knew it by. I knew that it caused temporarily paralysis but not much more.

This is an older website but I feel it will be helpful to you: index

And of course the aqha site with information:

aqha - hypp information

Hope that helps you.
correct me if i'm wrong, but i'm reading that to say, that if a horse born after 1998 has an ancestor with hypp it will be on the registration, so if my 2007 mare doesn't have anything on her registration, i'm to presume she's negative?

ETA: SHE HAS NO IMPRESSIVE IN HER BLOOD LINE, BUT SHE TREMBLES WHEN FRIGHTENED... BUT STOPS AS SOON AS SHE FEELS MORE SECURE...
     
    11-28-2011, 02:15 PM
  #26
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuisance    
correct me if i'm wrong, but i'm reading that to say, that if a horse born after 1998 has an ancestor with hypp it will be on the registration, so if my 2007 mare doesn't have anything on her registration, i'm to presume she's negative?

ETA: SHE HAS NO IMPRESSIVE IN HER BLOOD LINE, BUT SHE TREMBLES WHEN FRIGHTENED... BUT STOPS AS SOON AS SHE FEELS MORE SECURE...
Are you being obnoxious with your last statement? I'm not sure I understand the meaning behind it.

If I remember right, this was the first rule change regarding HYPP:

Foals born in 1998 and later and tracing to IMPRESSIVE will have a statement placed on their Certificates of Registration that recommends testing for the condition unless test results indicating the foal is negative (N/N) are on file with AQHA.


The next one came much later and is this:

Beginning with the 2007 foals, all Impressive progeny are required to be parentage verified and HYPP tested subject to the conditions listed in rule 205. Any that test H/H will not be eligible for registration.


They HYPP portion of Rule 205:

[c] Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) - designation effective for foals born on or after January 1, 1998. A muscular disease caused by a hereditary genetic defect that leads to uncontrolled muscle twitching or profound muscle weakness,
and in severe cases, may lead to collapse and/or death. According to research, this condition exists in certain descendants of the the stallion Impressive, AQHA registration number 0767246.



[1]
The following notification shall be placed on registration certificates of foals descending from the stallion Impressive or any other bloodline determined to carry the HYPP gene:


“This horse has an ancestor known to carry HYPP, designated under AQHA rules as a genetic defect. AQHA recommends testing to confirm presence or absence of this gene.”



When the parent(s) tracing from the HYPP line has tested negative for HYPP with an appropriate designation appearing on their registration certificate, the above notification is not required, and will, instead, be substituted by the designation “N/N”; or, after testing negative for the
gene, the notification may be substituted by the designation “N/N” upon request of the owner at his or her expense.



[2] Mandatory testing for HYPP. At such time as AQHA requires mandatory parentage verification of any foals to be registered in either the numbered or appendix registry,
(see 202 (i)) any foal tracing to bloodlines known to carry the HYPP gene shall be tested for HYPP at the time the genetic testing for parentage is performed. The results will
be designated on the registration certificate in lieu of the above notification. Such testing will not be necessary if the foal’s closest ancestors, tracing to the HYPP line, have
been tested negative and designated on their registration certificates, these foals will automatically be designated “N/N” on their registration certificate.



Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an inherited disease that leads to uncontrolled muscle twitching or profound muscle weakness, and in severe
cases, may lead to collapse and/or death. HYPP is listed as a genetic defect in AQHA’s rules, along with Parrot Mouth and Cryptorchid conditions.



To date, HYPP only has been traced to descendants of IMPRESSIVE, #0767246. Having negative (N/N) results on file may prevent a horse’s offspring from being tested. Foals born in 1998 and later and tracing to
IMPRESSIVE will have a statement placed on their Certificates of Registration that recommends testing for the condition unless test results indicating the foal is negative (N/N) are on file with AQHA. AQHA will test any foals who are required to be parentage verified and who trace to IMPRESSIVE for HYPP prior to them being registered. This testing
will be performed with the same DNA sample submitted to the laboratory for parentage verification.



AQHA will accept HYPP test results only if performed
through a licensed laboratory. Beginning with the 2007 foals, all Impressive progeny are required to be parentage verified and HYPP tested subject to the conditions listed in rule 205. Any that test H/H will not be eligible for registration. Possible results of HYPP testing are N/N, N/H and H/H.



HYPP is inherited as a dominant trait, which means a heterozygous (N/H) stallion or mare bred to a normal (N/N) horse will result in approximately half of the offspring being affected and half being normal. The rare homozygote (H/H) usually is severely affected with the disease and will pass the gene to its offspring 100 percent of the time.



HYPP can be treated through diet and medication in most cases.



AQHA Testing Kits can be ordered for $35.



I did read somewhere that AQHA is coming up with yet another rule which will only allow one to register an N/H mare if she has been fixed and will not be bred. They also will only register N/H geldings and I'm not sure when this rule takes effect but I think when that happens folks will stop breeding when there is a potential to end up with an N/H foal because it won't be feasable for them.

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    11-28-2011, 02:20 PM
  #27
Yearling
No I was NOT being obnoxious, sorry if you thought so. But, all this talk about HYPP, and it symptoms are tremors/muscle spasms, and my mare, who is very green, hasn't experienced anything outside a 20x20 pen for her first 4 yrs of life, gets tremors when she's frightened.... so, that makes me curious about HYPP.... but, she does not have the stud Impressive in her line, and they said all HYPP horses can be traced back to him. I really don't know how you thought that was obnoxious! Maybe you should read your reply to me!

Guess, I'll stop asking questions now!
     
    11-28-2011, 02:33 PM
  #28
Trained
Can someone post a registration certificate where the horse has tested N/N and one for a horse who has tested N/H? Black out all the personal stuff, I'm only interested in looking at the HYPP statements and how they appear on the registration forms.
     
    11-28-2011, 02:37 PM
  #29
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuisance    
No I was NOT being obnoxious, sorry if you thought so. But, all this talk about HYPP, and it symptoms are tremors/muscle spasms, and my mare, who is very green, hasn't experienced anything outside a 20x20 pen for her first 4 yrs of life, gets tremors when she's frightened.... so, that makes me curious about HYPP.... but, she does not have the stud Impressive in her line, and they said all HYPP horses can be traced back to him. I really don't know how you thought that was obnoxious! Maybe you should read your reply to me!

Guess, I'll stop asking questions now!
Truthfully I wasn't sure if you were making fun or if you were being serious. I've removed quite a few popcorn posts today and I geuss I'm testy. I apologize for that. As for my response, I think that is what you were asking, what the papers would show. If your horse has absolutely NO Impressive in its bloodlines then HYPP is not an issue for you but there are other things such as tying up syndrome (which I am not as familiar with but I think can be found in TB bloodlines). Or it could just be that she gets very nervous. My QH, who is NN does shake really bad when he's nervous.
     
    11-28-2011, 02:51 PM
  #30
Yearling
I apologize for jumping back at you, but I have been out of the horse scene for 30 yrs (i'm 50) and this hypp thing wasn't an issue then, just want to make sure we're good at my place.
     

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