Preggo Mare's weight?
 
 

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Preggo Mare's weight?

This is a discussion on Preggo Mare's weight? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • My mare just had foal and looks ribby
  • Should a pregnant mares ribs be showing

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    03-11-2012, 05:08 PM
  #1
Started
Preggo Mare's weight?

My mare, Sequel, is 9 months preggo tomorrow. I noticed within the last week about when she turns certain ways she looks ribby. This is my first preggo mare experience so I just want to be sure this is normal. Maybe the foal dropped some? Or should I start trying to pack some more weight on her? These pics were from 3 days ago. Thanks!
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    03-11-2012, 05:19 PM
  #2
Weanling
I think she should gain in weight, you should not be able to see the ribs on a pregnant mare.
And she will probably loose even more weight now that the foal is growing the most, if you don't increase her feed.
     
    03-11-2012, 05:21 PM
  #3
Weanling
It's not unusual for you to see ribs in the later part of the pregancy do to the weight of the baby. Your mare looks in good weight but this is the time to start adding more calories both for the mare and baby. While I think she is in good weight right now you probably would like to have extra on her at the time of foaling due to the demands of nursing.

Super Nova
Piaffe likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 05:23 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by StellaIW    
I think she should gain in weight, you should not be able to see the ribs on a pregnant mare.
And she will probably loose even more weight now that the foal is growing the most, if you don't increase her feed.
Most nutrition books will tell you you don't have to increase until the 9 month as the baby is still quite small.........but now is the time.

Super Nova
Piaffe likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 05:26 PM
  #5
Started
Sounds good...I'll up her hay as she is already at the bag limit on her LMF Development grain..hehe. She is a big girl...about 16.2-16.3. Thanks guys :)
     
    03-11-2012, 05:49 PM
  #6
Weanling
Yes, most nutrition books will tell you that, but if you see your horses ribs. You're too late in increasing the feed.

I had to increase my mares feed in the fifth month. If the horse is too thin, it doesn't matter if books tell you that the mare don't need more nutrition until the 9th month. You have to look at the horse to know.

I rather have a mare that's a bit too fleshy when it's time, because sometimes, the mare stops eating before the foal drops, and if you got a mare that's thin, That could be a catastrophe for both the mare and the foal.

Some people are scared that the mare will have a foal that's too big if they feed the mare enough food to make her fleshy, but there's research done that tell us that mares don't have a problem delivering the foal even if the mare is fleshy and big.
     
    03-11-2012, 06:12 PM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by StellaIW    
if you see your horses ribs. You're too late in increasing the feed.
I don't agree with that. I have seen rescued pregnant mares recover weight very well before foaling. And I don't believe for a second that my mare can't get more fleshy before foaling. I'm starting her a foaling thread pretty soon so I'll add pics as she goes along so we can keep track of her weight :)

Thanks for the advice.
     
    03-11-2012, 07:14 PM
  #8
Weanling
Yes, of course it can go well. But why compare your horse to a starved rescue horse? That's one extreme situation, and not one you should ever put a pregnant horse in, even if it might go well.

You should increase the feed before you start seeing ribs, you should only be able to feel the ribs on a 8-9 month pregnant horse.
And just because some mares give birth to healthy foals, while looking like a picked fence, it's not OK to let it happen.

I'm not trying to be rude or anything, but we had a few persons around here that said the same. The mare looked "ribby" when she was 8-9 months and the owners only then realized that they should increase the feed, but she didn't put on weight fast enough. She stopped eating three weeks before she dropped her baby.
She never recovered, even though the owners fed her so she had hay to eat 24/7 and as much alfalfa and dodson and horrell feed as she possible could eat.... and had to be put down. She was healthy otherwise, and the vet came out. Nothing wrong with her, she just wouldn't eat, because the she thought the baby took too much space in her belly.

I wouldn't want anyone to go through that. Ever.
     
    03-11-2012, 07:23 PM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piaffe    
I don't agree with that. I have seen rescued pregnant mares recover weight very well before foaling. And I don't believe for a second that my mare can't get more fleshy before foaling. I'm starting her a foaling thread pretty soon so I'll add pics as she goes along so we can keep track of her weight :)

Thanks for the advice.
Your mare would be in good condition if she were not pregnant, but she should idealy be in moderately fleshy condition when pregnant and nursing. You should not be in a position to "up" her hay - she should have free choice hay.

The objective is NOT to get a mare in moderately fleshy condition before foaling - the objective is to get a mare in moderately fleshy condition as soon as she is in foal (preferably before), and keep her there until weaning.

With that being said, it isn't like your mare is skinny or anything, but you should have upped her body condition to 5 long ago when it was easier to do so. Doing so now will be more dificult, but can still be done and will help keep her from drawing down excessively when she foals...
     
    03-11-2012, 10:13 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by StellaIW    
Yes, of course it can go well. But why compare your horse to a starved rescue horse? That's one extreme situation, and not one you should ever put a pregnant horse in, even if it might go well.
I certainly wasn't comparing my horse to a rescue horse...lol. I was commenting on your generalized statement that pregnant mares can't bulk back up after their ribs show. I have seen evidence that is contradictory hence the disagreeing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faceman    

You should not be in a position to "up" her hay - she should have free choice hay.
In the pasture it isn't possible to do free-choice. They have covered areas out there,but they don't have completely closed sides...and when it rains here it pours. And it rains/snows/sleet/hail OFTEN. And it is usually going sideways and every which way...lol. So free choice hay in the pasture would get wet,wasted,and unsafe very quickly.
I did decide to start stalling her at night so she WILL have free-fed grass hay all night in there. She also gets several flakes of Timothy hay and about 5+LB. Of alfalfa a day on top of the LMF Development and about 1/2-3/4 of a 5 gallon bucket of soaked beet pulp. She is also on a (can't remember for sure) 6 or 8 acre pasture with plenty of green "munching grass" as well.

Thanks for the tips everyone...I want to do the best. And since this is my first its a learning experience and I am happy to learn/glean tips from others.

Will post new pics soon :)
     

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