Question about Equine prenatal care
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeding

Question about Equine prenatal care

This is a discussion on Question about Equine prenatal care within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Horse prenatal problems
  • Maternity care for myhorse

Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By sabowin
  • 1 Post By Dreamcatcher Arabians

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-12-2011, 05:18 PM
  #1
Weanling
Question about Equine prenatal care

*Disclaimer* This is not a question to rile anyone up. I do not have a pregnant mare that I am denying prenatal care too, I have never even had a pregnant mare or a foal. This is just a question that I have in my mind because of some of you flaming others for not having a vet out for pregnant or assumed pregnant mares.

What ailments of mare and foal could be solved by prenatal checks? I ask this because when I had my kids, it seemed that all they did was assure I was still pregnant every time... And check for any deformities in the fetus- that they could not have done anything about anyway. It just gave me the option to know and terminate the pregnancy if I did not desire a child with said disabilities. I don't think they do these tests on horses anyway. I know there is a small chance for twins, and I read that they could pinch one off, giving the other a chance to live. Are there any other things a vet could diagnose and change the outcome of in a visibly heathy pregnant mare? I think that most o the foal deaths I have heard of could not have been prevented anyhow. I feel that it is a little extreme to call someone sick and declaring that they should not own horses if they are not getting prenatal care for said mare. I am just fine with being wrong, and thus educated about why I am wrong. Thanks!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-13-2011, 01:16 AM
  #2
Banned
It's important to know the projected foaling date, for one thing, so that one is prepared, as the mare won't always tell you on her own. Going far over the due date, without a vet's assurance that everything is all right, is very risky and can result in death of both mare and foal. Then yes, as you said, it's always a good idea to check for twins and pinch one off accordingly....sure beats the possiblity of two sickly and dying foals. Then there are recommended vaccinations to give to pregnant mares--but of course, some owners administer those themselves. If there are more concerns beyond the ones I listed, I'm sure some experienced breeders will fill them in....
     
    11-13-2011, 06:48 PM
  #3
Foal
I know nothing about equine prenatal care, but wanted to gently disagree that when a human is pregnant, the providers are only checking that she is still pregnant, and nothing more. Or at least, if that IS all your providers did, you should have fired them. They check for many conditions that can be caused by pregnancy, including gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia, monitor the size of the baby (too big can indicate health problems in the mother and potential problems with delivery, too small can indicate the baby isn't getting enough nutrients from the mother, among other things), the position of the baby, the amount of amniotic fluid, and yes, deformities and other problems with the baby that can be detected by ultrasound and other methods. And yes, some of those problems don't have any good solutions, but some of them can be helped pre-natally (they even do surgery on fetuses in utero!), some can be prevented from getting worse, and some may not be preventable or solveable, but just knowing about them can mean having the right medical staff on hand when the baby is born.

I'd imagine it's roughly the same with equine pregnancies. In a normal healthy pregnancy, it probably doesn't SEEM like the vet care makes much difference, but that just means things are going well. And if there IS a problem, much better to catch it early, prevent it or mitigate it when possible, and be prepared for the inevitable when necessary.
NdAppy likes this.
     
    11-13-2011, 09:04 PM
  #4
Trained
I have my mares checked at between 16 & 21 days in foal, then again at 45 days and after that it's up to me. I give Rhino shots at 3, 5, 7 & 9 months, then at 10 months I give the yearly shots. When I think I'm within 24 hrs of foaling, I deworm the mare with Ivermectin and at foaling the foal gets a Tetanus shot and his umbilical stump dipped in iodine. Within 12 hrs we check the foals IgG status to ensure good immune transfer. If all that goes well, then we're good to go and I involve the vet as little as possible. We check the placenta ourselves and if it's entire then we're good. If she retains the placenta or there's a huge piece missing (again indicating it might still be inside) then we have the vet do an exam and if necessary remove any retained placenta. We are not bashful about calling the vet out for anything either unusual or if we suspect something isn't as it should be.

Obviously that's for young healthy mares. If I have a mare who is older, tough to get in foal, or has trouble retaining a pregnancy, then the vet and I see each other a LOT more.
     
    11-13-2011, 09:16 PM
  #5
Showing
It's pretty much been covered. One other important reason to have a vet involved is to be able to have easier vet access should the mare have trouble during/after foaling. If not under guidance of a vet, chances of getting one out for a 3 am emergency call are a lot less. Mine is wonderful about that, she tracks their foaling dates and puts herself "on call" more so than usual and can be here within 20 minutes should the need arise.
     
    11-13-2011, 10:01 PM
  #6
Foal
Yep. That's it in a nut shell. I worried alot about my first foal, the waiting is the hardest part cause they don't have an actuall due date. A women who is lets say 4 weeks overdue can be induced, but with horses they can make you wait a year and eveything is okay.

Now my friend was given a 2 year old horse. The horse came from a lush pasture. She thought the horse had a grass belly. One day I went to help her feed and I told her the grass belly just kicked, the horse was pregnant and had a healthy something. The person who gave her the horse owned a Mammoth Jack kept in the same pasture. Two vets told her it was a horse colt and it looked like a horse colt, but the owner said it could only be a mule colt. Just a point that this was a very young horse no prenatal care, no extra feed, no shots and everything turned out fine.
     
    11-14-2011, 12:11 AM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
I have my mares checked at between 16 & 21 days in foal, then again at 45 days and after that it's up to me. I give Rhino shots at 3, 5, 7 & 9 months, then at 10 months I give the yearly shots. When I think I'm within 24 hrs of foaling, I deworm the mare with Ivermectin and at foaling the foal gets a Tetanus shot and his umbilical stump dipped in iodine. Within 12 hrs we check the foals IgG status to ensure good immune transfer. If all that goes well, then we're good to go and I involve the vet as little as possible. We check the placenta ourselves and if it's entire then we're good. If she retains the placenta or there's a huge piece missing (again indicating it might still be inside) then we have the vet do an exam and if necessary remove any retained placenta. We are not bashful about calling the vet out for anything either unusual or if we suspect something isn't as it should be.

Obviously that's for young healthy mares. If I have a mare who is older, tough to get in foal, or has trouble retaining a pregnancy, then the vet and I see each other a LOT more.

This is an excellent summary! The Rhino shots given to the mares are also called "Pneumabort-K" but the same basically.

I had a mare who was notorious for retaining her placenta. I kept Lutalyce on hand. If she retained her placenta, I gave her a shot and always checked to make sure the afterbirth was completely intact. If not, then the vet was called.

As far as deworming, people have differing opinions. I typically deworm before breeding season and wait until Fall when they are 90-120 days bred before I do it again. This is just my preference.

This is no longer PRE-natal care and may seem obvious, but make sure he sucks the mare, urinates and poops that first time. The colostrum makes for black sticky feces that may be hard to pass. An enema may be required.

But anyhow if you are thinking of breeding this year, good luck!
     
    11-14-2011, 12:27 AM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
This is no longer PRE-natal care and may seem obvious, but make sure he sucks the mare, urinates and poops that first time. The colostrum makes for black sticky feces that may be hard to pass. An enema may be required.

But anyhow if you are thinking of breeding this year, good luck!
I have 2 coming in Jan/Feb. I routinely warm a Fleet's enema and after he's suckled and is standing, I just stick that puppy in the foal's behind and give a good squeeze, about 1/2 the bottle. Then I get out of the way. Never had a meconium problem and by not overdoing the enema I have never had a prolapse, but it does seem to make things a little easier on Foalie.

I then take the Fleet's bottle and wash it out real good and wash the nozzle inside and out, and then I milk the mare into it so I can store some colostrum, just in case. In the case of a foal who is having trouble getting it all together, I give them some colostrum while they're still down but not enough to fill them up, to give their blood sugar a boost and get them the energy to stand.
COWCHICK77 likes this.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A question about probiotics and coat care. spookychick13 Horse Nutrition 4 03-05-2011 12:04 PM
Question for Fellow BO/BM's - post-op care QtrHorse Barn Maintenance 3 11-07-2009 10:17 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0