recent gelding - The Horse Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 12:42 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1
• Horses: 0
recent gelding

we recently came into owning a 5 year old stallion. This horse had lived with a group of horsed on the place he came from. We had him gelded 3 weeks ago and today tried to introduce him to our herd. He was fine with them for several hours and then suddenly he started trying to attack them. He broke the old gelding out of herd and was continually biting and chasing him. After we finally got them seperated and I caught him he walked out of the pen like nothing happened. My question is will do you think he will get over this behaviour with time or has been a stallion for two long.
rudy1966 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 12:45 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,716
• Horses: 1
My vet told me it can take some time for the testosterone to get out of a stallion's system.

Unless it weighs a ton... it's just a horse. Draft horse motto.
Solon is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 12:49 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Stroudsburg, Pa
Posts: 984
• Horses: 4
It can take up to 6 months or so for the testosterone to leave his system. I had my guy gelded at 3, but he wasn't studdy to begin with so it left him faster. It all depends on the horse.
kassierae is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 08:57 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
With older horses it may be as much a learned response as a function of chemistry. He may have been behaving like that since he was two or three years old so it's pretty ingrained. You would have been better off to have turned him in when he was still sore from being gelded and didn't want to fight too much but that ship has sailed.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 09:00 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5,289
• Horses: 0
This is a wait and see situation. You won't really know what you've got in terms of stallion behavior for 3 - 6 months. I would continue to treat him as a stallion for that period of time.

And to kevin's point, lots of horses that are cut later retain some stallion behaviors as learned behaviors.
maura is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 09:51 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Iowa
Posts: 6,012
• Horses: 0
Before I gelded my 13 yr old stallion I had him in paddocks next to his future pasture mates so they could get aquainted before hand. I am sure when he was in a herd before it wasn't with male competition just mares. A stallions instinct is to kill other males so they can have the herd to themselves.
churumbeque is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 09:52 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3,968
• Horses: 8
Like the others mentioned, you wont really know what your dealing with until he fully settles in as a gelding. My coming 8 year old (in my avatar) was only gelded last year, and had been used as a breeding stallion before that, so I had a lot of concern about putting him with my other horses - especially my young colt. It had been close to 6 months he had been gelded when I got him. I got lucky, he did fine with my horses, and seemed to have no "studdy" behaviors retained, other than initially he did try to mount my pony when she was in heat - so we seperated her out when she was cycling, until the last few months he has stopped doing it (though she has continued to cycle this winter). There is always a chance a horse gelded that late will retain some studdy habits, sometimes for a long time, sometimes forever, and you have to learn to work around it. You might not ever be able to turn him out with your herd. You might just have to give it some time. It's really a wait and see kind of thing.
Indyhorse is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 01:14 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 100
• Horses: 0
at three weeks after, they can actually get a mare pregnant. It takes 30 days for the live sperm to be gone. Some say longer. It takes 60 days or more to lose the hormone, testosterone. But as said above, if it's a learned response, embedded in their brain, they may always chase other "boys" out of a herd of mares.

I bought 2 geldings at the same time once. They were great buddies. Then they were out with mares. The first time a favorite mare came into heat, one gelding ran the other through a PIPE fence.

So some do great, and some are idiots forever. Hard thing to predict.
JB44 is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 01:16 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,716
• Horses: 1
I had a proud cut gelding growing up. He would mount my grandpa's mare. OMG as a kid it was so embarrassing to have your friends over to see that!

Unless it weighs a ton... it's just a horse. Draft horse motto.
Solon is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 02-14-2010, 01:20 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3,968
• Horses: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solon View Post
I had a proud cut gelding growing up. He would mount my grandpa's mare. OMG as a kid it was so embarrassing to have your friends over to see that!
*LMAO* My last horse, a FQH, was also proud cut. I worked at a guided ride stable and he was my guide mount. A fantastic horse, but not fun to explain when you have just led a group of girl scouts into the barn to go for a ride and he's feeling his oats
Indyhorse is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Me and charli - recent - charliBum Horse Videos 2 12-13-2009 04:24 PM
Recent photos equus717 Horse Pictures 11 12-05-2009 11:26 PM
recent artwork i have done :) hannah_xx Horse Artwork 6 12-28-2008 09:05 AM
Recent Purchase mark filbert Horse Artwork 4 10-13-2008 01:26 PM
Some recent photos! Cheval Horse Pictures 11 07-11-2008 06:52 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome